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AT&T in advanced talks to acquire DirecTV for ~$50 billion


PythonFanPA
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Will they spin off U-Verse? DirectTV and UVerse compete directly.

No. U-verse will likely be expanded by DirecTV programming agreements, and DirecTV will continue to be available for DSL subscriber bundles.

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No. U-verse will likely be expanded by DirecTV programming agreements, and DirecTV will continue to be available for DSL subscriber bundles.

So, we will have two divisions of the same company compete for the same customer? Yeah, right : :P !

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So, we will have two divisions of the same company compete for the same customer? Yeah, right : :P !

 

It makes as much sense as having a landline telco own a wireless network.

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So, we will have two divisions of the same company compete for the same customer? Yeah, right : :P !

 

Yeah! I mean, why would Apple knowingly release a phone that would cannibalize their iPod market?

 

Or why would Wrigley release new brands of gum to compete against their old flavors?

 

Sometimes it's better to compete with your own market share, because if you don't, someone else will.

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Yeah! I mean, why would Apple knowingly release a phone that would cannibalize their iPod market?

 

Or why would Wrigley release new brands of gum to compete against their old flavors?

 

Sometimes it's better to compete with your own market share, because if you don't, someone else will

I don't think that kind of logic will fly with the feds.

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I would like to see ATT commit to delivering more high speed (either wired or fixed wireless ), affordably priced broadband to a margin of rural/semi rural Direct customers who currently do not have access to wired high speed broadband or are left paying premium prices for small buckets. If the government is going to entertain this, id like to see them use it as an opportunity to further their broadband access mission vs. just letting ATT eliminate competition.

 

Sent from my SM-N900V using Tapatalk

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I have Directv bundled with my Verizon landline (and soon-to-be DSL too). Wonder what this might mean for people like me? It's a popular triple play bundle in this part of PA. ATT has no landline business in PA.

 

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Yeah! I mean, why would Apple knowingly release a phone that would cannibalize their iPod market?

 

Or why would Wrigley release new brands of gum to compete against their old flavors?

 

Sometimes it's better to compete with your own market share, because if you don't, someone else will.

They can easily make the two complement each other. Satellite is spotty in densely populated cities and uverse is not available everywhere. Also consider that all cable tv is transmitted via satellite and this deal starts to make sense.

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AT&T has confirmed the directv deal for $48.5 billion. If the FCC lets this go through, they better let sprint and t-mo merge.

 

 

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AT&T has confirmed the directv deal for $48.5 billion. If the FCC lets this go through, they better let sprint and t-mo merge.

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5S using Tapatalk 2

Why?

 

DirecTV owns no satellite assets directly. EchoStar, controlled by Ergen, acquired all of Hughes satellite systems. DirecTV and AT&T don't compete at all. In fact, the two have been strong partners since the SBC/BellSouth days. The only wireless spectrum assets that DirecTV owns are for Brazil and Colombia. Obviously, since BellSouth divested its Latin American units to Telefónica nearly a decade ago, AT&T doesn't have anything there. And AT&T is divesting SBC's 10% stake in América Móvil to prevent arguments with Latin American regulators.

 

The situations are completely different. Sprint and T-Mobile compete in every market and they compete for the same customers. So unless you are completely blind to how M&A works, you'd realize that DirecTV/AT&T and Comcast/TWC have no effects on changing the regulators' mind on T-Mobile/Sprint.

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In the areas that AT&T offers it, does U-verse TV not compete with DirecTV?

 

In areas that UVerse covers they compete directly. In areas where there's no UVerse, AT&T overs DirectTV bundles. In those areas, something has to go since you are eliminating a competitor.

Edited by bigsnake49
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So, this move eliminates one of the pay TV competitors. So if this merger is approved we will have: AT&T/DirectTV or Verizon, Dish and a cable co. So if they want 4 competitors for wireless, why not 4 competitors for payTV? AT&T has about 6M customers for UVerse and DirectTV will have 20Million. If the FCC/DOJ wanted to encourage FTTH, this will pretty much kill it.

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