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Has anyone looked into Sprint's Market of New York City?


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Just wanted to bring this inconsistency to your attention.

 

Sprint's New York market launch involves some New York City boroughs, and as far as neighborhood or communities of Queens, extracted and individually wrapped up into completely independent markets!!!

 

So according to Sprint, in the state of New York they have six independent LTE "markets" deployed out of one single New York City Metro market, for the sake of competition and increasing their market count..

 

Those six markets are 4 NYC boroughs of Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island. All counted as separate markets in Sprint's data base.

 

But then, they really chose to "One Up" every other Tier 1 operator, and murder everyone by counting community of Jamaica, Queens, and neighborhood of Flushing, Queens as separate markets. 

 

To me as a New Yorker, this is beyond shameless. Other three Tier 1 operators count all of those NYC areas into a single New York City Market. Period. Sprint? Not so much.

Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, would love to hear your opinions.

 

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Then what are they doing with their LTE coverage post? What's the purpose of all this nonsense? I'm completely speechless.

 

 

Which nonsense? Coverage isn't complete, but they're listing cities where it's close. I'm not following. 

I agree, they don't announce a market as launched till enough coverage exist to cover most areas of the cities/metro areas. In NYC is such a big area they are just trying to highlight areas there they have coverage.  

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I don't understand the issue here. It is far more questionable to count s small city as a market versus splitting up NYC into markets. The city offers a unique mix of geography, population density and large geographical size.

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I don't think they are participating in some kind of conspiracy to fake a higher LTE count, but merely providing a more precise breakdown of where exactly a customer could expect to find a signal. Isn't that what people have been complaining about regarding a too broad of a coverage map that seems to exaggerate? Obviously they won't break down smaller towns into sections, but with NYC being so massive, it makes sense.

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Just wanted to bring this inconsistency to your attention.

 

Sprint's New York market launch involves some New York City boroughs, and as far as neighborhood or communities of Queens, extracted and individually wrapped up into completely independent markets!!!

 

So according to Sprint, in the state of New York they have six independent LTE "markets" deployed out of one single New York City Metro market, for the sake of competition and increasing their market count..

 

Those six markets are 4 NYC boroughs of Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island. All counted as separate markets in Sprint's data base.

 

But then, they really chose to "One Up" every other Tier 1 operator, and murder everyone by counting community of Jamaica, Queens, and neighborhood of Flushing, Queens as separate markets. 

 

To me as a New Yorker, this is beyond shameless. Other three Tier 1 operators count all of those NYC areas into a single New York City Market. Period. Sprint? Not so much.

Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, would love to hear your opinions.

 

u085Z7R.png

 

Being from NYC, I know what you mean. These neighborhoods however, aren't seperate markets. Rather they just put those to show that LTE service is available in these neighborhoods in this borough as well.

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Here's the list of the 185 markets that Sprint is claiming: http://newsroom.sprint.com/news-releases/4glte-launchedmarkets.htm

 

Paynefanbro is correct. Nowhere on it is Queens, Staten Island or Flushing or Jamaica. Thus, this is much ado about nothing.  <_<

This is confusing then. I pulled the screenshot out of the main page at http://network.sprint.com

Why even bother titling it "Sprint 4G LTE launched Cities"? 

In my opinion, the newsroom article should've been consistent with all other showings of their coverage. To call Flushing, Queens a 4G LTE City is just wrong and it looks really bad.

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This is confusing then. I pulled the screenshot out of the main page at http://network.sprint.com

Why even bother titling it "Sprint 4G LTE launched Cities"? 

In my opinion, the newsroom article should've been consistent with all other showings of their coverage. To call Flushing, Queens a 4G LTE City is just wrong and it looks really bad.

I don't understand the problem here. It looks like Those areas a pretty much covered.

 

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This is confusing then. I pulled the screenshot out of the main page at http://network.sprint.com

Why even bother titling it "Sprint 4G LTE launched Cities"? 

In my opinion, the newsroom article should've been consistent with all other showings of their coverage. To call Flushing, Queens a 4G LTE City is just wrong and it looks really bad.

Downtown Flushing is actually pretty descent in terms of LTE. but north flushing, east flushing need some work. i get around 96-105 dbm average at home for LTE, which is not bad at all. but it is still very spotty and phones hanging onto weak LTE signals gets really frustrating sometimes. only way to avoid it is put the phone on CDMA mode for 3G only. 

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This is confusing then. I pulled the screenshot out of the main page at http://network.sprint.com

Why even bother titling it "Sprint 4G LTE launched Cities"? 

In my opinion, the newsroom article should've been consistent with all other showings of their coverage. To call Flushing, Queens a 4G LTE City is just wrong and it looks really bad.

 

I don't really see where the confusion is. Far be it for me to speak for Sprint's marketing department, but Paynefanbro's explanation, while succinct, seems perfectly plausible. From the link that you provided it doesn't seem that they're keep a public count of cities (or communities) so I'm not really even sure what the issue is here.

 

 

Rather they just put those to show that LTE service is available in these neighborhoods in this borough as well. 

 

What I'm confused about is that this was your original gripe:

 

Sprint's New York market launch involves some New York City boroughs, and as far as neighborhood or communities of Queens, extracted and individually wrapped up into completely independent markets!!!

 

So according to Sprint, in the state of New York they have six independent LTE "markets" deployed out of one single New York City Metro market, for the sake of competition and increasing their market count..

 

Those six markets are 4 NYC boroughs of Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island. All counted as separate markets in Sprint's data base.

 

But then, they really chose to "One Up" every other Tier 1 operator, and murder everyone by counting community of Jamaica, Queens, and neighborhood of Flushing, Queens as separate markets

 

 

You asked to be corrected if you were wrong and indeed it was shown that you were. It would seem that in light of that you would make a correction, retraction, mea culpa, anything here, DSLR, HoFo, Twitter and wherever else, but instead you appear to be moving the goalposts in order to quibble about semantics. That looks really bad imo.

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Haha, zoom closer. What's mapped is covered, look at the streets and alleyways.

 

That's a deceptive zoom level.

-Will

You want every street and alley covered? 2 things you will need there.

 

Someone with a lot of money/gas/time on their hands and Tri Band(800, 1900, 2600) LTE.

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You want every street and alley covered? 2 things you will need there. Someone with a lot of money/gas/time on their hands and Tri Band(800, 1900, 2600) LTE.

Yes I want coverage everywhere. Otherwise I'm going to get my @$$ chewed for pleading Sprint.

Let's just make it Quinband (800/900/1900/2600/3600) plus you don't need that much money or time, read the sensorly directions, map where you go...that includes your home, neighborhood, work, school etc.

-Will

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Yes I want coverage everywhere. Otherwise I'm going to get my @$$ chewed for pleading Sprint.

Let's just make it Quinband (800/900/1900/2600/3600) plus you don't need that much money or time, read the sensorly directions, map where you go...that includes your home, neighborhood, work, school etc.

-Will

I do, but alleys? really?

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Haha, zoom closer. What's mapped is covered, look at the streets and alleyways.

 

That's a deceptive zoom level.

-Will

 

Yep, some areas look like they are covered on Sensorly in many other cities but I know better and that's coming from a Note2 user.  A -118 standing outside isn't consider covered to me.  You really have to cut out the two light purple colors and just stick with the two darker shades to really consider it covered.

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This is confusing then. I pulled the screenshot out of the main page at http://network.sprint.com

Why even bother titling it "Sprint 4G LTE launched Cities"? 

In my opinion, the newsroom article should've been consistent with all other showings of their coverage. To call Flushing, Queens a 4G LTE City is just wrong and it looks really bad.

 

Would you rather have them say NYC, and then have poor coverage in other boroughs compared to the other carriers so that Sprint loses customers? Or would you rather Sprint announce the areas in NYC that have LTE so that they can retain some of those customers that otherwise might've not considered Sprint in the first place.

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Honestly, the way that Sprint breaks it up is about as honest as a marketing department can get. Sprint could just make a blanket claim and say "NYC is covered" and leave it at that. NYC is a huge area and that would exaggerate reality. Instead, Sprint is being honest and listing just the parts of NYC that are covered. Perhaps someone needs to lay off the T-Mobile kool-aid and take a few breaths before starting a witch hunt over something that isn't there.

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The main issue here is the inconsistency on Sprint.com. 

If you don't see anything wrong by going to http://network.sprint.com and hitting "check markets across country" button on the right, then seeing 7 different "markets" within NYC metro alone, then I'm just gonna drop it right here. 

 

Then as someone pointed out newsroom article has completely different list. http://newsroom.sprint.com/news-releases/4glte-launchedmarkets.htm

 

But ok I'll drop it, why don't we all agree that there is absolutely no issue here, and that this is perfectly fine.

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Yes I want coverage everywhere. Otherwise I'm going to get my @$$ chewed for pleading Sprint.

Let's just make it Quinband (800/900/1900/2600/3600) plus you don't need that much money or time, read the sensorly directions, map where you go...that includes your home, neighborhood, work, school etc.

-Will

Septi-band (850/900/AWS/1900/2600/3500) or bust!  :tu:

 

Are you talking about ISM 900 (902-928 MHz) or EGSM band (880-915 / 925-960 MHz)? And when you say "3600", you're referring to 3.4-3.6 GHz band or the 3.6-3.8 GHz band?

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