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Sprint TD-LTE 2500/2600mhz Discussion


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I found a link i found interesting. I wanted to see what kind of performance Softbank's TD-LTE was getting in Japan. According to the link, Softbank is using 2.6ghz spectrum in a 30mhz channel. Pretty good performance i would say.

 

http://www.huawei.com/ilink/en/success-story/HW_195558#.UeQvY9hnaqk

 

For those that do not want to read:

 

Spectrum: 2.6ghz

Channel width: 30mhz

DL Speeds: up to 76Mbps

UL Speeds: up to 10Mbps

I'm so ready to experience this network. Clearwire has stated that its LTE network can reach 168mbps. I wonder if that's still softbank's and sprints plan

 

http://www.fiercewireless.com/story/clearwire-our-lte-advanced-network-will-be-able-hit-168-mbps/2012-05-14

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I'm so ready to experience this network. Clearwire has stated that its LTE network can reach 168mbps. I wonder if that's still softbank's and sprints plan

 

http://www.fiercewireless.com/story/clearwire-our-lte-advanced-network-will-be-able-hit-168-mbps/2012-05-14

 

Too bad Sprint isn't planning LTE-A carrier aggregation across it's 800-, 1900- and 2500 MHz bands 

 

News from 7/15: Sprint/Clearwire is "on track to have 5,000 TD-LTE sites on air by the end of December."

 

http://www.fiercewireless.com/story/sprint-adds-clearwires-25-ghz-band-lte-coverage-area/2013-07-15

 

If I recall correctly, Sprint's plan is to put 2.5 Ghz on each of it's 38,000 or so towers. If so, the "5000 by 12/31/13" figure would seem to indicate a slow pace. 38k total towers - 5k done = 33k remaining. 33k towers / 12 months = 2750k/month needed to meet it's total network build-out goal by the end of 2014.

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Too bad Sprint isn't planning LTE-A carrier aggregation across it's 800-, 1900- and 2500 MHz bands

 

News from 7/15: Sprint/Clearwire is "on track to have 5,000 TD-LTE sites on air by the end of December."[/size]

 

http://www.fiercewireless.com/story/sprint-adds-clearwires-25-ghz-band-lte-coverage-area/2013-07-15

 

If I recall correctly, Sprint's plan is to put 2.5 Ghz on each of it's 38,000 or so towers. If so, the "5000 by 12/31/13" figure would seem to indicate a slow pace. 38k total towers - 5k done = 33k remaining. 33k towers / 12 months = 2750k/month needed to meet it's total network build-out goal by the end of 2014.

Is that the timetable for the 3 bands to be in the majority of markets? End of 2014? Or just using it as an example? Edited by Poopscoop2323
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Too bad Sprint isn't planning LTE-A carrier aggregation across it's 800-, 1900- and 2500 MHz bands 

 

News from 7/15: Sprint/Clearwire is "on track to have 5,000 TD-LTE sites on air by the end of December."

 

http://www.fiercewireless.com/story/sprint-adds-clearwires-25-ghz-band-lte-coverage-area/2013-07-15

 

If I recall correctly, Sprint's plan is to put 2.5 Ghz on each of it's 38,000 or so towers. If so, the "5000 by 12/31/13" figure would seem to indicate a slow pace. 38k total towers - 5k done = 33k remaining. 33k towers / 12 months = 2750k/month needed to meet it's total network build-out goal by the end of 2014.

Actually I think kind of are. First, and correct me if I'm wrong, I believe that the NV equipment is Release 9 which is merely a software update to Release 10 (LTE-A). But the big wrench in all this is that you can't combine TD-LTE with FDD, which means that you can pair band 26 (800 MHz) with band 25 (PCS A-G blocks, 1900 MHz) but not with band 41 (2600 MHz).

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Too bad Sprint isn't planning LTE-A carrier aggregation across it's 800-, 1900- and 2500 MHz bands

 

News from 7/15: Sprint/Clearwire is "on track to have 5,000 TD-LTE sites on air by the end of December."[/size]

 

http://www.fiercewireless.com/story/sprint-adds-clearwires-25-ghz-band-lte-coverage-area/2013-07-15

 

If I recall correctly, Sprint's plan is to put 2.5 Ghz on each of it's 38,000 or so towers. If so, the "5000 by 12/31/13" figure would seem to indicate a slow pace. 38k total towers - 5k done = 33k remaining. 33k towers / 12 months = 2750k/month needed to meet it's total network build-out goal by the end of 2014.

Where did you hear that? I thought the plan was LTE on 99% of Sprint's towers, but that's on Sprint's G block. Clearwire's spectrum would be deployed in high traffic hot spot areas (think near ball parks and stadiums). Edited by avb
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Too bad Sprint isn't planning LTE-A carrier aggregation across it's 800-, 1900- and 2500 MHz bands 

 

News from 7/15: Sprint/Clearwire is "on track to have 5,000 TD-LTE sites on air by the end of December."

 

http://www.fiercewireless.com/story/sprint-adds-clearwires-25-ghz-band-lte-coverage-area/2013-07-15

 

If I recall correctly, Sprint's plan is to put 2.5 Ghz on each of it's 38,000 or so towers. If so, the "5000 by 12/31/13" figure would seem to indicate a slow pace. 38k total towers - 5k done = 33k remaining. 33k towers / 12 months = 2750k/month needed to meet it's total network build-out goal by the end of 2014.

 

There are no such plans for 2500 LTE at this point in time. Right now the plan is for urban and high capacity areas only.

 

That plan may change under SoftBank's influence, but at this point it has not changed.

 

Sprint is putting 1900 LTE on nearly every site, and then 800 LTE on about 80% of sites. 

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But the big wrench in all this is that you can't combine TD-LTE with FDD.

Or at least aggregate the 800 mhz smr and the 1900 mhz pcs.

 

Since the other carriers are using FDD-LTE, would any of them be able to use LTE-A carrier aggregation across all of their bands?

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Where did you hear that? I thought the plan was LTE on 99% of Sprint's towers, but that's on Sprint's G block. Clearwire's spectrum would be deployed in high traffic hot spot areas (think near ball parks and stadiums).

so no 2.5 ghz love for the suburbs most likely

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There are no such plans for 2500 LTE at this point in time. Right now the plan is for urban and high capacity areas only.

 

 

 

just looking at the NV sites listed for Portland, OR. There isn't a lot of towers listed for the NW district which has a stadium. Or for the downtown area which has tons of people. Most of the towers are by the waterfront which has relatively few people.

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I think it's safe to say that with the recent announcement of an additional $16 Billion in Network upgrades we will see an expansion of 2.5 but we'll just have to wait until Sprint's earnings call to shareholders to hear more detailed information. Until then we can only speculate.

 

Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

 

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I think it's safe to say that with the recent announcement of an additional $16 Billion in Network upgrades we will see an expansion of 2.5 but we'll just have to wait until Sprint's earnings call to shareholders to hear more detailed information. Until then we can only speculate.

 

Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

Nahh they are just going to make all the cell sites look like trees.

 

Sent from my SPH-L900 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

 

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Or at least aggregate the 800 mhz smr and the 1900 mhz pcs.

 

Since the other carriers are using FDD-LTE, would any of them be able to use LTE-A carrier aggregation across all of their bands?

I would imagine they want to keep the 800 LTE channel for situations where you can't get a good signal with 1900? If you aggregate it then there will be less capacity there for people who can't get a signal on 1900. I'm not sold on channel aggregation as being an important feature.

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Since the other carriers are using FDD-LTE, would any of them be able to use LTE-A carrier aggregation across all of their bands?

 

Found the answer: "Despite the intermodulation and interference challenges inherent in inter-band CA, rival operators AT&T (NYSE:T) and Verizon Wireless (NYSE:VZ) have publicly stated their plans to use the technology to gain additional capacity by combining their respective 700 MHz and AWS spectrum holdings into larger delivery pipes."

 

http://www.fiercebroadbandwireless.com/story/sprint-exec-clearwire-spectrum-our-priority-lte-carrier-aggregation/2013-04-21#ixzz2ZLe9ClUC

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There are no such plans for 2500 LTE at this point in time. Right now the plan is for urban and high capacity areas only.

 

That plan may change under SoftBank's influence, but at this point it has not changed.

 

Sprint is putting 1900 LTE on nearly every site, and then 800 LTE on about 80% of sites. 

 

This article mentions "sector." Not sure if that means every tower or what:

 

"Clearwire, which has said it intends to start offering LTE this summer with a 20 MHz channel in TDD-LTE Band 41, which encompasses 2496-2690 MHz spectrum. Clearwire expects to subsequently use intra-band continguous CA to combine its initial 20 MHz with another 20 MHz, creating a 40 MHz pipe at every sector"

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This article mentions "sector." Not sure if that means every tower or what:

 

"Clearwire, which has said it intends to start offering LTE this summer with a 20 MHz channel in TDD-LTE Band 41, which encompasses 2496-2690 MHz spectrum. Clearwire expects to subsequently use intra-band continguous CA to combine its initial 20 MHz with another 20 MHz, creating a 40 MHz pipe at every sector"

It makes no reference to a national scale. Each site is broken into two or three sectors. So they are just saying that in the sites where it is deployed, each sector will have a 40MHz pipe.

 

Robert from Note 2 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

 

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Is the 2.5 ghz spectrum only capable of doing TD LTE? Could another carrier lease some of the EBS spectrum and put FD LTE there instead?

I don't think so, if my understanding is correct then the FCC didn't make FDD blocks with EBS and BRS, it's all one big chunk of spectrum.

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just looking at the NV sites listed for Portland, OR. There isn't a lot of towers listed for the NW district which has a stadium. Or for the downtown area which has tons of people. Most of the towers are by the waterfront which has relatively few people.

Sorry, but what does this have to do with Clear? Two different projects you are mixing here.

 

Sent from my HTC ONE

 

 

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I received an email from a source that says Sprint/Clearwire (Sprintwire?) are turning on TD-LTE 2600 today in a few markets over the legacy Clearwire network. He specifically named LA, NYC and Tampa. But there are others too. If I find out the other markets, I'll let you know. But there will probably be a press release soon.

 

Time to get those triband hotspots! Where's the triband smartphones?

 

Robert from Note 2 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

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Based on population density? lol... Kind of obvious.

 

It's just that I have heard people mention every other city besides NYC for a possible first round launch of Clear's LTE.

 

 

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How did I know NYC would be one of the first?

 

Because you are a geocentric New Yawker?

 

:P

 

AJ

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