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Stay Connected This Summer: Sprint 4G LTE Expands into 22 New Cities


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OVERLAND PARK, Kan., June 17, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Sprint (NYSE:S) today announced the availability of its all-new 4G LTE network in 22 new cities, just in time for the official start of summer. Customers in "hotspots" such as Miami, New Orleans, Raleigh, N.C., and Tampa, Fla., are now able to download videos, access the Internet and send photos with greater speed and reliability thanks to the power of Sprint 4G LTE.

 

Additionally, new customers switching to Sprint can save up to $100 on any smartphone with a new two-year service agreement and activation and a qualifying plan.

 

Today, Sprint is launching 4G LTE in:

Baton Rouge, La. Longview, Wash.

Centralia, Wash. Miami

Clarksville, Tenn. Napa, Calif.

Corsicana, Texas New Orleans

Dalton, Ga. Palatka, Fla.

Dunn, N.C. Raleigh, N.C.

Fond du Lac, Wis. Sebring, Fla.

Gainesville, Fla. St. Cloud, Minn.

Henderson, N.C. St. Joseph/Benton Harbor, Mich.

Kingsport, Tenn. Tampa, Fla.

Lansing/East Lansing, Mich. Warsaw, Ind.

 

 

Sprint already offers 4G LTE in other top summer destinations like Atlanta, Boston, Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles and San Juan, Puerto Rico. With today's announcement, Sprint offers 4G LTE service in 110 markets nationwide and expects to provide 200 million people with LTE by the end of 2013.

 

"Today's announcement means that more Americans will experience the speed and power of Sprint 4G LTE," said Bob Azzi, senior vice president-Network, Sprint. "Sprint is committed to delivering the latest technology through a nationwide LTE buildout, and providing new cell sites that are more compact and energy efficient. Our network build with new 3G and 4G LTE not only provides improved wireless service it is also expected to reduce Sprint's total energy demand and the company's carbon footprint."

 

As Sprint turns on new cell equipment across the country, customers are seeing better coverage, improved network reliability and voice quality on 3G and discovering LTE signals in cities that haven't officially been announced, including Washington, D.C., New York and San Francisco.

 

Sprint today is also announcing that more places will be getting LTE in the coming months. These cities include:

Grand Rapids, Mich. Flint, Mich.

Aberdeen, Wash. Laredo, Texas

Allegan, Mich. Marshfield/Wisconsin Rapids, Wis.

Ann Arbor, Mich. Mount Pleasant, Mich.

Battle Creek, Mich. Oak Harbor, Wash.

Corpus Christi, Texas Watertown/Fort Atkinson, Wis.

Eagle Pass, Texas

 

 

 

As more people use wireless data at home, work and on the go, Sprint's all-new 4G LTE allows wireless users to accomplish more things with less time such as sharing photos, streaming videos or downloading large files, all in minutes. According to management consulting firm Chetan Sharma Consulting, mobile data is expected to comprise 99 percent of the global mobile traffic by 2014. To meet these growing demands of data users, Sprint has deployed "Network Vision" to build an all-new network with an updated 3G network and new 4G LTE network.

 

Additionally, Sprint has greatly improved the customer experience over the past several years. According to the 2013 American Customer Satisfaction Index, Sprint is the most improved company in customer satisfaction, across all 47 industries, over the last five years. When you combine Sprint's top-notch customer service with one of Sprint's powerful 4G LTE devices – such as Kyocera Torque, HTC One or Samsung Galaxy S® 4 – and a Sprint Everything Data plan, it's easy to see that Sprint is the best choice in wireless.

 

The Sprint 4G LTE network is also offered through its industry-leading prepaid brands, Boost Mobile and Virgin Mobile USA, as well as Sprint Emerging & Wholesale Solutions, which offer wholesale 4G LTE service to Mobile Virtual Network Operators (MVNOs).

 

For the most up-to-date details on Sprint's 4G LTE portfolio and rollout, visit www.sprint.com/network.

 

 

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/stay-connected-summer-sprint-4g-120000718.html;_ylt=At5RULZv9iB41rSBqg73llwIuodG;_ylu=X3oDMTIxdmYzYjNrBG1pdANXaWRlIFF1b3RlcyBNb2R1bGUEcG9zAzMzBHNlYwNNZWRpYVJlY2VudFF1b3Rlc1BvcnRmb2xpb3NXaWRl;_ylg=X3oDMTJuZjRucmNmBGludGwDdXMEbGFuZwNlbi11cwRwc3RhaWQDZmEwYjk2YjAtMWM5MC0zOTE3LWFjMDUtMmY3YTlhODRiY2M5BHBzdGNhdANuZXdzBHB0A3N0b3J5cGFnZQ--;_ylv=3

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I really wish they would have not launched New Orleans or Baton Rouge yet.  Especially New Orleans...kind of hard to launch without the French Quarter having any LTE coverage.  Those maps on their site are huge lies as well ;)

 

It would be like launching Las Vegas with absolutely zero coverage on the strip.

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I really wish they would have not launched New Orleans or Baton Rouge yet. Especially New Orleans...kind of hard to launch without the French Quarter having any LTE coverage. Those maps on their site are huge lies as well ;)

 

It would be like launching Las Vegas with absolutely zero coverage on the strip.

 

I concur that in some markets, it will be critical to cover some key areas before they can launch. I mean, how can they launch Santa Fe, without including Bobcat Bite? I think not! ;)

 

Robert via Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

 

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The map in Lansing Michigan is incredibly generous to the coverage.  Even outside with a Note 2, I don't get LTE in many of those areas.

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So just to clarify, Miami, FL has officially been launched?

 

 

-Luis

 

Yes, Miami is launched, but not complete.

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5 using Tapatalk 2

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No New Mexico!?   :td:  :unsure:

Launching or announcing means nothing. Become a sponsor and see the sites in ABQ that have been accepted all ready.  LTE is only a short time away. One site already LTE accepted, and two other sites ready for LTE acceptance. 

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Wow - Just looked at the coverage maps for Miami - and it shows LTE coverage all over...  This is def not right.

 

That's how Houston was back in July/August of last year. Coverage map showed blanket coverage but that certainly wasn't the case.  Now Houston is about 70% (according to the Network Deployment List) complete and I'm on LTE about 95% of the time.

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Wow - Just looked at the coverage maps for Miami - and it shows LTE coverage all over... This is def not right.

 

^this

 

Over the summer I'm working teaching at MDC Wolfson in Downtown Miami and I laughed when I saw the Downtown area completely covered with the "fair signal". That's BS, there's no LTE in the streets, it's actually 1xRTT and roaming when you step inside.

 

Sent from my SPH-L900 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

 

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Guys, this is old news.  Sadly, we may never know what is up with Sprint marketing's cartography department, but the launched market coverage maps are not accurate initially.  We dealt with this issue starting late last summer.  In response, Robert created some alternative coverage maps, and I did some field testing to show that our coverage maps were more accurate than were marketing's coverage maps.  The issue does not seem to be going away, but harping about it does not make it any better.  Instead, focus on the the LTE sites completed maps here.

 

AJ

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The map in Lansing Michigan is incredibly generous to the coverage.  Even outside with a Note 2, I don't get LTE in many of those areas.

I think the map on http://coverage.sprint.com is very much generous, showing seamless coverage from Lake Odessa to Williamstown.  I drive from south of Portland to Lansing every day and drop LTE about two miles west of Grand Ledge, then pick up LTE somewhere near the central downtown Lansing area on 496.   I'm not convinced that 'all' are 'on' at this point, even after being publicly announced.   I'm not sure if "launching" is simply acknowledging LTE service in the area or an invitation to use it.

 

Coverage is a ton better than it was a month ago, but in this area if you're on 3G you can forget doing anything at all.

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I think the map on http://coverage.sprint.com is very much generous, showing seamless coverage from Lake Odessa to Williamstown.  I drive from south of Portland to Lansing every day and drop LTE about two miles west of Grand Ledge, then pick up LTE somewhere near the central downtown Lansing area on 496.   I'm not convinced that 'all' are 'on' at this point, even after being publicly announced.   I'm not sure if "launching" is simply acknowledging LTE service in the area or an invitation to use it.

 

Coverage is a ton better than it was a month ago, but in this area if you're on 3G you can forget doing anything at all.

Almost every tower in the Lansing area has new panels and radios, just waiting on Backhaul and acceptance.  The exception is the lugnut downtown...

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I concur that in some markets, it will be critical to cover some key areas before they can launch. I mean, how can they launch Santa Fe, without including Bobcat Bite? I think not! ;)

 

Robert via Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

I understand the logic but where do you draw the line? Most metropolitan areas have several MUST cover spots. Do you wait till you cover all those spots before you launch, let your opinion on what location is more important than another or follow your own metrics?

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... but the launched market coverage maps are not accurate initially...

 

I don't know about the other maps, but the Lansing one isn't just generous on LTE. It's claiming LTE coverage in places where there is no PCS EVDO service at all (even according to Sprint's own maps).

 

If you flip between the two, the boundary lines for LTE claim to go out farther than Sprint's own map for voice service. It's showing LTE data coverage in places where they claim to only have voice roaming.

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I don't know about the other maps, but the Lansing one isn't just generous on LTE. It's claiming LTE coverage in places where there is no PCS EVDO service at all (even according to Sprint's own maps).

 

If you flip between the two, the boundary lines for LTE claim to go out farther than Sprint's own map for voice service. It's showing LTE data coverage in places where they claim to only have voice roaming.

 

Whoops  :lol:

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I don't know about the other maps, but the Lansing one isn't just generous on LTE. It's claiming LTE coverage in places where there is no PCS EVDO service at all (even according to Sprint's own maps).

 

If you flip between the two, the boundary lines for LTE claim to go out farther than Sprint's own map for voice service. It's showing LTE data coverage in places where they claim to only have voice roaming.

As strange as it sounds, I almost have to wonder if Sprint marketing's cartography department does not have the ability distinguish between CDMA2000 RSSI and LTE RSRP. Robert, what was the figure of merit that we saw Sprint determine for the edge of LTE coverage, -119 dBm RSRP? Could it actually be that the maps are being projected out to -119 dBm RSSI instead?

 

AJ

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Migrated from Original Forum. Originally Posted 14 January 2011

 

 

 

I have yet to verify this, and I am very skeptical that it is true. But my wife claimed that she was getting 4G WiMax at her work on the outskirts of St. Cloud. I tried to pick it up in several spots, including her work, and couldn't connect to anything. I think she was mistaken, but I'm hoping...

 

 

 

I know what grumpy old men would say about it... wish in this hand and crap in the other and see which gets filled first.

I smell an article coming....

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As strange as it sounds, I almost have to wonder if Sprint marketing's cartography department does not have the ability distinguish between CDMA2000 RSSI and LTE RSRP. Robert, what was the figure of merit that we saw Sprint determine for the edge of LTE coverage, -119 dBm RSRP? Could it actually be that the maps are being projected out to -119 dBm RSSI instead?

 

AJ

This is extremely interesting and possibly a colossal "did I do that?"

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