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Sprint names Junichi Miyakawa as Technical Chief Operating Officer


dkyeager
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http://newsroom.sprint.com/news-releases/sprint-names-junichi-miyakawa-as-technical-chief-operating-officer.htm

 

Seems to imply greater control from HQ and /or freeing up CEO for more marketing focus.

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I believe the  best part is leading Sprint's relationships with key network equipment vendors.

 

Sounds like he will be cracking the whip on latent suppliers/slow installers then possibly suffer monetary consequences or contract cancellations.

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In the course of trying to learn more about Miyakawa, I came across several articles/press-releases about Softbank's LTE TDD deployments in Japan.

 

In the link below they talk about having 50-100 base stations per square kilometer.  That's insane!  Would Sprint ever do that in metro areas here?

 

http://www.huawei.com/ilink/en/success-story/HW_195558

 

 

According to the Softbank website, they are expanding to 94,000 base stations as of March 2014.

 

 

http://www.softbank.jp/en/corp/business/mobile/

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In the link below they talk about having 50-100 base stations per square kilometer.  That's insane!  Would Sprint ever do that in metro areas here?

 

 

 

Sounds like Midtown Manhattan in NYC. If Sprint managed to do that throughout the entire city, they'd have no competition. The problem is, that's expensive.

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Sounds like Midtown Manhattan in NYC. If Sprint managed to do that throughout the entire city, they'd have no competition. The problem is, that's expensive.

I wonder what's their new strategy for small cells. We haven't heard much about their strategy since early summer and the last thing I remembered was they plan on using "spark cells" that will include both 1900 & 2500 spectrum

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Anything that will help sprint. Sprint has everything they need to be successful. Now it's just a matter of getting stuff done. The issues that we experienced in NV 1.0 should NEVER  happen again if Sprint wants to succeed.

Everybody is having problems with their deployment, even the mighty Verizon. My brother in law's Verizon 5s is stuck on 1x a lot of the time, even though we are supposedly fully covered with Verizon LTE. 

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I wonder what's their new strategy for small cells. We haven't heard much about their strategy since early summer and the last thing I remembered was they plan on using "spark cells" that will include both 1900 & 2500 spectrum

Maybe working with Artemis Networks?

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Sounds like Midtown Manhattan in NYC. If Sprint managed to do that throughout the entire city, they'd have no competition. The problem is, that's expensive.

Big money! Big money! No Whammies! No Whammies! STOP!!!

 

 

 

Using Sharp AQUOS Crystal with Tapatalk

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Press your luck was one of my favorite game shows.

 

Sent from my LGLS990 using Tapatalk

Mine too. I even bought the iPhone game, and iPad game too.

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 6+ using Tapatalk

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Sounds like Midtown Manhattan in NYC. If Sprint managed to do that throughout the entire city, they'd have no competition. The problem is, that's expensive.

 

In US, just NYC/CHICAGO need this kind of density. So it won't be too crazy for them.

In Japan, they may have 10 cities need this kind of deployment.

But their current priority should be deployment of 8T8R in big metros and B26 across the nation.

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In US, just NYC/CHICAGO need this kind of density. So it won't be too crazy for them.

In Japan, they may have 10 cities need this kind of deployment.

But their current priority should be deployment of 8T8R in big metros and B26 across the nation.

 

LA, San Francisco, perhaps a few others.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/wendell-cox/americas-densest-cities_b_5888424.html

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That's all true but that's looking at the metropolitan areas of cities. The difference between New York and many other cities is that most people who work in NYC also live in NYC. Most people commute from the other 4 boroughs to Manhattan more often than not. That's not to say people don't come from other places, because they do. I had a teacher in middle school that used to commute from Connecticut every day.

 

In terms of density of the city itself (city boundary) NYC is ranked first with a density of 27,560 per square mile while Los Angeles has a density of 7,722 per square mile. Chicago has 11,519 per square mile. San Francisco has 3,611 per square mile. Boston has 7,207 per square mile.

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This article has some interesting information about how Softbank (including inherited networks) has built out a very dense 2.5 GHz TD-LTE network in Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya.

 


 

Highlights include:

• They use omnidirectional antennas instead of a multi-sector config.

• 50-150 sites a square kilometer area

• Distance between sites can be as low as 164 feet.

• Base stations are centralized.

• Look at the picture at the end of the article for a typical installation.

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