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AT&T putting up new antennas and RRUs


caspar347
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I was leaving school today and noticed hoist ropes dangling off of the tower on our school property. I ran over and found a crew putting up 2 new antennas and 1 RRU per sector on the AT&T rack. This struck me as odd because I believe the current equipment on the tower is fully B17 and B4 LTE capable. The new RRUs say RRUS12 B4 and the antennas both have two frequency sets (basically all of 700+CLR and AWS+PCS and WCS, apparently) despite being different heights. The tech I talked to seemed to know what he was doing (a rare occurrence) and said that one of the antennas was specifically for LTE. The taller antennas also have, among other things, "WCS" written on them in marker.

 

http://m.imgur.com/a/W4XXm

 

Anyone have any idea what is happening?

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Those look just like these:

 

KVREOiQ.jpg

 

New ATT sites Here are 4 panel sectors, with only 2 running. Most likely not running WCS yet. But have the capabilities of so.

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Does T have that much AWS nationwide? I know that WCS is really there only expansion band (outside of the impending auctions).

It's either aws or pcs for their second lte carrier. Market by market type of stuff.

 

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

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The photographed antenna panel does seem to represent an AT&T infrastructure bandwidth expansion.  Previous antennas supported Lower 700 MHz (band 17) through AWS-1 1700+2100 MHz (band 4).  This antenna supports Lower 700 MHz (band 12/17) and Cellular 850 MHz (band 5) via its low frequency port, as well as PCS 1900 MHz (band 2), AWS-1 1700+2100 MHz (band 4), and WCS 2300 MHz (band 30) via its mid/high frequency ports.  And it does appear to have dual mid/high frequency ports.

 

Antenna gurus, can you corroborate?

 

AJ

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The photographed antenna panel does seem to represent an AT&T infrastructure bandwidth expansion.  Previous antennas supported Lower 700 MHz (band 17) through AWS-1 1700+2100 MHz (band 4).  This antenna supports Lower 700 MHz (band 12/17) and Cellular 850 MHz (band 5) via its low frequency port, as well as PCS 1900 MHz (band 2), AWS-1 1700+2100 MHz (band 4), and WCS 2300 MHz (band 30) via its mid/high frequency ports.  And it does appear to have dual mid/high frequency ports.

 

Antenna gurus, can you corroborate?

 

AJ

I think the panels are still on the ground and I can get more photos of specific stuff tomorrow if there's anything in particular we need pics of. Like the RRUS12.

 

Also, I think I got pics of both antenna bottoms. I'll check tomorrow.

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What RRU does AT&T use now? RRUS 12 B4 only support band 2, 4, and 5 so no WCS deployment just yet.

Most sites I've seen with these new installs have 4 panels two unused. My guess is the will have WCS dedicated RRUS and just use the unused panels for WCS and extra LTE carriers for b2,b5, and b4.

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The photographed antenna panel does seem to represent an AT&T infrastructure bandwidth expansion. Previous antennas supported Lower 700 MHz (band 17) through AWS-1 1700+2100 MHz (band 4). This antenna supports Lower 700 MHz (band 12/17) and Cellular 850 MHz (band 5) via its low frequency port, as well as PCS 1900 MHz (band 2), AWS-1 1700+2100 MHz (band 4), and WCS 2300 MHz (band 30) via its mid/high frequency ports. And it does appear to have dual mid/high frequency ports.

 

Antenna gurus, can you corroborate?

 

AJ

If this indeed is right (I learned never to doubt you), this is a quite interesting set up. It is flexible for whatever holdings they have for that market. The question is now, is this set up necessary for them?
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If this indeed is right (I learned never to doubt you), this is a quite interesting set up. It is flexible for whatever holdings they have for that market. The question is now, is this set up necessary for them?

 

They are preparing for the refarming of their PCS and CLR holdings, so they are future proofing their network.

Edited by bigsnake49
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Just took more pics that I'll upload later. The short and long antennas have the exact same port layouts and numbers. The tech told me that these would replace two of the three antennas per sector on the tower.

 

Also: the tech claimed that the ALU equipment around here sucks and the Ericsson stuff is better after I mentioned Sprint using Ericsson elsewhere in the US. I chuckled a bit and said "whatever." Is this the first positive review of Ericsson gear ever?

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Ham-Radio-2.3WCS.jpg

 

Email from ARRL about ATT WCS band.

 

In comments filed in response to an AT&T Mobility Petition for Rule
Making seeking a new air-to-ground communications system on 2.3 GHz
Wireless Communications Service (WCS) spectrum, the ARRL has once
again asked the FCC to elevate the Amateur Service allocation at
2300 to 2305 MHz from secondary to primary. The Petition (RM-11731)
asked the Commission to authorize an LTE-based in-flight
connectivity service in the WCS "C" and "D" blocks (2305-2315 MHz
and 2350-2360 MHz, respectively) for airlines and airline
passengers. AT&T has asserted that restrictions on out-of-band
emission and power limits to protect adjacent-band users make the
use of the C and D blocks problematic. The wireless provider asked
the FCC for rule changes to permit deployment of its service "using
currently fallow spectrum" while also "preserving adequate
interference protection to users of adjacent bands."

"Notwithstanding this broad and nebulous claim, there is no showing
anywhere in the four corners of the Petition that the proposed rule
changes would permit any continued Amateur Radio operations on a
secondary basis in the shared A block (2305-2310 MHz)," the ARRL
commented on September 22. More to the point, the League said, there
is no showing in the Petition that Amateur Radio operations in the
adjacent 2300-2350 MHz band would be protected from increased
out-of-band emissions, if the FCC were to implement the changes
requested.

The League asserted in its comments that the FCC has, to date,
"failed to protect Amateur Radio operations at 2300-2305 MHz from
WCS out-of-band emissions." The ARRL said the band is "regularly and
substantially utilized by radio amateurs" for weak-signal,
long-distance communication and, only by circumstances - a lack of a
primary occupant - has it been able to enjoy that segment as a de
facto primary user.

"The Commission's rules are quite clear that WCS licensees enjoy no
entitlement to disrupt adjacent-band radio service operations," the
ARRL commented. But, the League pointed out, previous FCC actions to
expand mobile broadband devices left 2300-2305 MHz vulnerable to
increased out-of-band interference that would be difficult or
impossible to mitigate. The ARRL said amateur stations operating in
the 2300-2305 MHz band would be unable to avoid interference from AT
and T Mobility's proposed system, and that the FCC has refused to
clarify the obligation of WCS mobile providers to avoid interference
to Amateur Radio operations there.

The ARRL objected to what it called the FCC's "practice of making
allocation decisions which place incompatible uses in close
proximity to amateur stations and then place on the amateur
licensees the burden of avoiding the interference."

"It is obvious that the result of the AT&T Petition will be a
virtual preclusion of amateur access to the 2305-2310 MHz segment,"
the ARRL's comments continued. "A ubiquitous air-to-ground system
which operates at and above 2305 MHz will clearly render the
secondary allocation status of that segment a virtual nullity."

The ARRL asked the FCC to recognize Amateur Radio's "de facto
primary status" at 2300-2305 MHz and to elevate that segment from
secondary to primary for amateurs. It further called on the
Commission to "clarify the obligation of WCS licensees in all
contexts to protect the adjacent-band Amateur Service operations at
2300-2305 MHz from harmful interference." Finally, the League
requested that AT&T provide "a complete technical compatibility
showing and interference analysis" that would demonstrate
compatibility between its proposed service and amateur operations at
2300-2305 MHz.

 

 

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In Los Angeles AT&T has mostly 4 panel installations. Verizon is a hodge podge of everything. It looks like they picked up panels from garage sales around town.

 

Sprint's racks will also fill up eventually with their own sort of hodge podge. In addition to the current 800/1900 and B41 antennas, they'll also have 600 MHz + any equipment related to a spectrum hosting deal with Dish or a CCA partner. So it's important for them not to put off taking down the legacy antennas for too long.

 

Also, does this mean the AT&T work stoppage is coming to an end?

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Sprint's racks will also fill up eventually with their own sort of hodge podge. In addition to the current 800/1900 and B41 antennas, they'll also have 600 MHz + any equipment related to a spectrum hosting deal with Dish or a CCA partner. So it's important for them not to put off taking down the legacy antennas for too long.

 

Also, does this mean the AT&T work stoppage is coming to an end?

I would say no. The towers AT&T have been working on in my area were permitted 4 to 5 months ago.
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