Jump to content

Wi-Fi for all, all for One - Comcast thread


dnicekid
 Share

Recommended Posts

What about Comcast? They are supposedly going to launch WiFi/cellular network. Using some of vzw network I believe.

 

If the merger goes it could be Comcast that lands the infrastructure...

 

If the merger fails it might be

Comcast buying Tmo...

 

It may be possible because of Comcast masa

Is really trying to get Tmo. Comcast could enter and have big impact from the start with bundling.... Just some thoughts

 

As far as sprint goes if they can do this 8t8r and 800 LTE to 200+ by summer 2015 it would be huge. I do legere keeps posting #sprintthings to keep Tmo fan base motivated and take the air out of whatever sprint may have to say... - Smart tactics on his part

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about Comcast? They are supposedly going to launch WiFi/cellular network. Using some of vzw network I believe.

 

If the merger goes it could be Comcast that lands the infrastructure...

 

If the merger fails it might be

Comcast buying Tmo...

 

It may be possible because of Comcast masa

Is really trying to get Tmo. Comcast could enter and have big impact from the start with bundling.... Just some thoughts

 

As far as sprint goes if they can do this 8t8r and 800 LTE to 200+ by summer 2015 it would be huge. I do legere keeps posting #sprintthings to keep Tmo fan base motivated and take the air out of whatever sprint may have to say... - Smart tactics on his part

This Comcast plan that you talk about,how bout some link's sound very interesting first i'v heard about it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm more OK with Softbank merging Sprint and T-Mobile than Comcast taking over T-Mobile. Comcast has no wireless experience, has really poor customer satisfaction, and is already becoming "too big to fail". We don't need another company to bail out when the economy tanks.

 

Regardless, Comcast has sold off virtually all forms of spectrum. I'd say they're not interested in entering the wireless biz anymore, thankfully.

Edited by MkVsTheWorld
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Au contraire.  Comcast Metrophone was a major Cellular 850 MHz operator in the Northeast before it was sold to SBC about 15 years ago.

 

AJ

Wasn't Comcast a part of SpectrumCo as well?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heck no! I would never allow my ISP to allow others to use my Internet that I pay for!

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5S using Tapatalk 2

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well as long as you have you have your own router they can't share your internet

 

 

Sent from my iPhone 5S using Tapatalk

Comcast gave me a gateway modem that broadcasts WiFi. I disabled it and hardwired it into my own Asus Router. It's pretty awesome and I don't have to worry about Comcast allowing access to my internet bandwidth.

 

Sent from my LG-LS980

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heck no! I would never allow my ISP to allow others to use my Internet that I pay for!

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5S using Tapatalk 2

I'm pretty sure that the cable CO's already do this. If you're a Comcast subscriber and use their routers, I'm pretty sure other Comcast subs can log in to your router's "public" virtual access point.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wasn't Comcast a part of SpectrumCo as well?

Yes. The previous poster already addressed that.

 

Regardless, Comcast has sold off virtually all forms of spectrum. I'd say they're not interested in entering the wireless biz anymore, thankfully.

AJ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure that the cable CO's already do this. If you're a Comcast subscriber and use their routers, I'm pretty sure other Comcast subs can log in to your router's "public" virtual access point.

The Comcast router actually has 2 WiFi access points, 1 public and 1 private. You can google how to disable the public one. I did this, and while WiFi Analyser can still see that there is a signal, it has no name and is impossible to connect to. In my opinion, it is unconscionable for Comcast to do this, as I am certain a good hacker could break into the public one and get to the private side.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Comcast router actually has 2 WiFi access points, 1 public and 1 private. You can google how to disable the public one. I did this, and while WiFi Analyser can still see that there is a signal, it has no name and is impossible to connect to. In my opinion, it is unconscionable for Comcast to do this, as I am certain a good hacker could break into the public one and get to the private side.

Oh, so it's not actually virtual. Still really weird.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my opinion, it is unconscionable for Comcast to do this, as I am certain a good hacker could break into the public one and get to the private side.

 

A good hacker likely could break in to your non Comcast, non public hotspot, no problem.  So, I would not lose any sleep over it.  Instead, as I already posted once, think of the potential offloading benefits.

 

http://gigaom.com/20...ndwidth-future/

 

AJ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Au contraire. Comcast Metrophone was a major Cellular 850 MHz operator in the Northeast before it was sold to SBC about 15 years ago.

 

AJ

15 years ago isn't exactly relevant experience. Cellular technology has changed dramatically just over the past 5 years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 years ago isn't exactly relevant experience. Cellular technology has changed dramatically just over the past 5 years.

Hey, you made the "no wireless experience" statement. You might want to be more careful with your assertions in the future.

 

AJ

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First off, let me start by suggesting we make this its own thread, because I can see this new topic going on for a while, and we are WAY off the original topic. Now I shall give my two cents on this Wi-Fi sharing thing (or whatever you want to call it).

 

I absolutely hate this idea. I pay (well, my Dad pays, but you get the point) for my home broadband connection. There is no reason that I should have to give someone else access to MY connection and use MY bandwidth and add more data to MY home data usage. I don't need to be getting slowed down by someone who is getting to use MY internet that I pay for (again, my Dad pays for it, but you should still get the point ;) ) and not pay ME for using MY internet. If I wanted my network to be open to the world, I wouldn't have a WPA2 security password on it. We have over 15 devices all connected to our home network, and we need all the bandwidth we can get. I would rather join T-Mobile than let this happen. (Yeah, it's not really relevant, but it show's how badly I don't want this to happen.)

 

Now, if my ISP wanted to come to my house and run a new COAX line to my house and provide me with a second router for this public Wi-Fi access point, then by all means, go right ahead! I would be 100% on board with that!

 

P.S. - Yes, I do understand that according to the article AJ posted, a customer has the choice whether or not they want to have this public Wi-Fi connection on, but I hate the idea of what a user a few posts before this one said about Comcast providing people with routers that already have these public access points and that you have to jump through hoops in order to turn it off.

 

Sorry about the rant, just wanted to throw this out there.

 

-Anthony

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I absolutely hate this idea. I pay for my home broadband connection. There is no reason that I should have to give someone else access to MY connection and use MY bandwidth and add more data to MY home data usage. I don't need to be getting slowed down by someone who is getting to use MY internet that I pay for and not pay ME for using MY internet. 

 

Now, if my ISP wanted to come to my house and run a new COAX line to my house and provide me with a second router for this public Wi-Fi access point, then by all means, go right ahead! I would be 100% on board with that!

 

Would you feel the same way if you had a gigabit fiber line in your home, and the 'public wifi' side was limited to just 10mbps (roughly just 1% of the total speed of the line)

 

Would you feel the same way if your ISP gave you a slight discount for leaving their public hotspot wifi open (say a $5/month off the bill)

 

Are you against the idea, period? Or are you against Comcast's bad implementation of this idea?

 

Or are you frustrated with the bad implementation of their network? (with costs so high, and speeds so low / flakey that we instinctively fight for every Mbps we can get out of the network)

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey, you made the "no wireless experience" statement. You might want to be more careful with your assertions in the future.

 

AJ

OK, you made your point. Thank you for pointing it out. We all got the picture. Now, can we move past this now?

 

No experience is the same as no relevant experience. My original post was still right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First off, let me start by suggesting we make this its own thread, because I can see this new topic going on for a while, and we are WAY off the original topic.

 

Yeah, if there's any way to split this off into it's own topic... 

ThatD-be-great.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Comcast gave me a gateway modem that broadcasts WiFi. I disabled it and hardwired it into my own Asus Router. It's pretty awesome and I don't have to worry about Comcast allowing access to my internet bandwidth.

 

Sent from my LG-LS980

I do the same thing. I disabled the WiFi in my DOCSIS 3.0 cable modem and connected my own Gigabit AC WiFi Router.

 

Robert via Samsung Note 8.0 using Tapatalk Pro

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • large.unreadcontent.png.6ef00db54e758d06

  • gallery_1_23_9202.png

  • Posts

    • Some recent non-urban new builds in Utah, which are a mix of Sprint conversions and new site builds: Central Cedar City Enoch Parowan Beaver Wallsburg I'm also hearing of future new site builds in places that currently have weak / no signal on all carriers like Fountain Green, Oak City, Woodland, and along Hwy 191 in the canyon north of Helper by the Power Plant. There are also an unbelievable number of Sprint conversions happening in the urban Wasatch Front corridor as well. 
    • Only time I have gotten a free sim from them is when I "purchased" some "free" phones from T-Mobile, unless I go back to when they were a distant 4th carrier.  My four other MVNOs are feast or famine, so I try to keep several hanging around.  I have noticed different versions have different capabilities, and newer is not always better.  They typically force you to upgrade when you need to activate another discount period.  
    • Hard to imagine they're actually worth much as easy as they are to get free though.....they keep sending them out unsolicited like nuts.  We just got like a 3rd packet of them less than a month ago and got another email notifying "SIM card is on the way".  
    • E-bay.  The physical sims do have one advantage: they are not tied to your phone, thus you can change phones mostly without your carriers permission (except Sprint billing). Benefits signal hunters, travellers, and thieves.
    • Maybe in a museum? When the phone manufacturers follow Apple’s lead and go all eSIM it will be a moot point. At least in the states. 
  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...