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Apple iPhone 5 Reviews have fanboy reviewers?!


Fifth313ment
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http://www.engadget....phone-5-review/

 

Below is a post I made on Engadget about their iPhone 5 review. One read over of the review blew me away! I thought I was going to see one of those warnings like, "Note: This review is an advertisement"?! One you read the full review at the link above and then come back and read my comment you'll understand what I mean.

 

This review is a journalist joke Engadget:

 

My favorite is that if you go back and read Engadget's own HTC EVO 4G LTE review the EVO LTE gets bashed for it's own 2-tone back side (polycarbonate/anodized aluminum) calling it a "mish-mash of materials lining the back of the phone"! In the iPhone 5 review the same 2-tone back side (glass/anodized or raw aluminum) is the "hallmark of design" and "These glossy bands break up the matte uniformity, but help boost antenna performance"! What was it doing on the EVO LTE? The small polycarbonate area covering the back of the EVO LTE was there to serve as an antenna pass through for better signal range and to protect the camera lens.

 

Engadget where are the performance benchmarks, screen comparisons (HOX, SGS3, etc) or camera shootouts? They also don't make any mention of a missing hardware shutter button on the iPhone 5, which they mention and bash just about every Android phone for not having?

 

As for battery performance the EVO LTE only made 9 hours of battery life in Engadget's review, however, my EVO LTE gets a full 24+ hours with 5+ hours of screen time (and many other review sites gave the EVO LTE much better battery scores)! And most of the time I make 2+ days with less screen time! On the iPhone 5 "tests" reveal that Engadget is getting 14+ hours of battery life when NOT ONE OTHER REVIEW has anywhere near that result, on GSM test models no less (CDMA models usually do worse on battery)! Oh and if you're keeping score at home Engadget also bashed the EVO LTE for having an internal battery, which is mentioned no where in the iPhone 5 review.

 

As for the screen Engadget says, "The new height results in a phone with more usable space and better presentation for HD content (the iPhone is finally 16:9)." Now anyone who doesn't know any better would think the iPhone 5 has an HD screen due to that sentence and no where in the article do they mention that the screen is not HD! They do mention the iPhone's resolution but most users don't understand how to read XxX units? They figure if they say HD enough (FaceTime HD, HD content) it will propagate the readers mind and they will just believe it's true?!

 

And finally (I can think of 50 more but I'll limit my post to these) when mentioning the wireless connectivity options on the iPhone 5 the way Engadget words the CDMA vs GSM paragraph would leave any non-tech user thinking that CDMA networks (Verizon & Sprint) can't do simultaneous voice and data, which we know isn't true as the SGS3, EVO LTE, Viper, etc all support this! You don't mention that this is a flaw of the iPhone 5 and users are left thinking that their carriers are inferior!? At one point in the review Engadget tried to make it seem like the Android LTE phones would get the same or slower speeds than the iPhone 5 ("Data transmission speeds were at or above comparable Android LTE devices!").

 

I've never seen such a review in which Engadget panders to Apple in every way! I'm surprised Engadget didn't bring up the argument (as many retail & grocery stores explain products getting smaller by placing them in larger appearing containers) that the iPhone 5 has a smaller 4 inch screen so that it will fit better into your hand during calls! Maybe I missed it? Pure pandering crap!

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I wouldn't expect anything else from Engadget. Engadget tends to rave over everything Apple does and they've always had a bias which favors Apple products. Not even worth reading, in my opinion.

 

Edit: 10 bucks says they ban you for that post.

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I think you are trying to read between the lines, when nothing is there. Switching to 16:9 does make better presentation for HD content. They never said it actually played content in HD and the HD facetime comes from the fact that the front facing camera now records in 720p.

 

It seems like Miram reviewed the Evo, while Tim reviewed the iPhone. They probably have different opinions, so you cannot fault them for that, plus the iPhone two tone does look better than the Evo's two tone back, and I dislike the two tone look on both.

 

The iPhone volume up button functions as a camera shutter, so they are not bias in that regard.

 

And on your battery comment, Gizmodo and Theverge said it was poor.

http://gizmodo.com/5910015/htc-evo-4g-lte-lightning-review-the-phone-that-would-be-king-but-isnt

http://www.theverge.com/2012/5/11/3012990/htc-evo-4g-lte-review

 

In Engadget standard test they got 11+hrs. the 14hrs came from their personal usage, which just like yours, is anecdotal. Also are you sure it was a GSM iPhone? The phones show Verizon as the carrier, and in the paragraph below the battery review, they say that they have a Verizon iPhone.

 

I think you need to get your "I Heart Android" panties out of a wad and relax. It is just a review. The opinion of some blogger.

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Sounds kind of like the lifehacker guys all jumping in bed with apple any chance they can get.

 

Getting 24+ hours with typical usage would be easy on the EVO LTE. I'll go all day from 6am-10pm and have 60% left on my phone.

 

Just ignore the brainwashed sheep, everything Apple does is awesome to them even it was already done by someone else. Just like the articles talking about the double glass on the 4, then now they talk about this phone. When the moral of the story is, Apple realized double glass was stupid unless it was going to sit in a glass display. They will continue to tell you why they don't need the features of 2012 and why their old tech is the best. It's pointless, just move on and enjoy your phone of today.

 

The true underlying fact that none of the Apple sheep want to admit is they've bought so much content from the itunes store that switching over to android would be a very expensive change (even though they probably don't use the old purchased content anymore). Instead of manning up and saying they are jealous and wish they could switch to the open and new tech world of Android, they defend their feeble purchase to the bitter end.

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I'm going to just shoot across the bow now. You guys can respond with facts for or against the OP. No rants or diatribes. I can already see how this thread could go bonkers. Our moderators will be watching this thread.

 

Robert via CM9 Kindle Fire using Forum Runner

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Thank you! Plenty to like about all the current top tier smartphones. Using one or the other doesn't make anyone a "mindless sheep" or fanboi. We live in incredible times. Enjoy your device of choice.

 

The namecalling is depressing and gives me a headache.

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This willingness to make value judgments about someone based on their choice of wireless device has always been baffling to me. Does it really matter to you what another person chooses to carry around as their phone? And if it does, doesn't that say more about you than it does about them?

 

As for the review, it's not surprising that Engadget reviews tend to be more Apple friendly. I wouldn't be surprised if most of their staffers are using Apple products throughout their workday (macs, macbooks, etc.). If you take it's intent as a review of the iPhone and not as a comparison between the iPhone and Android phones then there is less to get heated about in my opinion.

 

The OP of this thread mentions the "non-tech" reader several times in his comments but I doubt there are many folks reading engadget who fit that description. Tech savvy readers are well able to understand and decipher the finer points of resolution and other things and if they're not tech savvy then they likely don't care about them anyway.

 

I just think that folks on both sides should just relax a little bit. The tendency of many Android fans to immediately discount ANY positive statements about Apple is not very different from Apple fans disregarding ANY negative statements about the product. It might be helpful and take some of that vitriolic energy and channel it into some introspection to discover why another man's electronics choices matter so much to you.

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I do think the review is extremely biased, but most are. It's hard to have an Android user review an Apple device and not bash it, just as it's hard to have an Apple user review an Apple device and not overlook any flaws.

 

What got me most about that review, as I posted elsewhere, was the flat statement of fact that CDMA can't do simultaneous voice and data. Of course, most Engadget readers are not likely to know any better, whereas, since I do, it makes me question the entire review more. Given that is a significant difference in carriers for past devices, it's interesting to perpetuate that fact when you are blaming it on the carriers and not the hardware manufacturer for a brand new device.

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What got me most about that review, as I posted elsewhere, was the flat statement of fact that CDMA can't do simultaneous voice and data. Of course, most Engadget readers are not likely to know any better, whereas, since I do, it makes me question the entire review more. Given that is a significant difference in carriers for past devices, it's interesting to perpetuate that fact when you are blaming it on the carriers and not the hardware manufacturer for a brand new device.

 

Nice. I see what you did there.

 

Sent from my C64 w/Epyx FastLoad cartridge

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I just think that folks on both sides should just relax a little bit. The tendency of many Android fans to immediately discount ANY positive statements about Apple is not very different from Apple fans disregarding ANY negative statements about the product. It might be helpful and take some of that vitriolic energy and channel it into some introspection to discover why another man's electronics choices matter so much to you.

 

As in most cases, Odell, your sentiments ring very true. But let me offer this counterpoint. Many are angry at iOS fans because they enable Apple, which is seemingly trying to do to mobile devices what VZW and AT&T are trying to do to wireless service -- use regulatory capture to wipe out the competition and leave consumers with little choice. And even iOS' most blind devotees should be able to see, ironic pun intended, that lack of competition would be bad for Apple innovation.

 

AJ

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nd even iOS' most blind devotees should be able to see, ironic pun intended, that lack of competition would be bad for Apple innovation.

 

Rings so true! I don't want an Apple device. But I love the fact that there is an Apple. But I do not love that Apple wants to limit my choices. We all benefit from competition. I hope the Windows mobile platform gets leg under it too. Better for all of us.

 

Robert

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I hope the Windows mobile platform gets leg under it too. Better for all of us.

 

Speaking of which, have you seen the HTC Windows Phone 8X introduced today?

 

http://www.phonescoop.com/articles/article.php?a=11168

 

It seems to be coming to the other big three, but not Sprint. Regardless, it looks like a contender.

 

AJ

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Speaking of which, have you seen the HTC Windows Phone 8X introduced today?

 

http://www.phonescoo...cle.php?a=11168

 

It seems to be coming to the other big three, but not Sprint. Regardless, it looks like a contender.

 

AJ

 

I'm willing to try a Windows Phone 8 on a flagship device, as a secondary phone. I'm trying to get one for my work phone on a Verizon line. Maybe this one?

 

Robert

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As in most cases, Odell, your sentiments ring very true. But let me offer this counterpoint. Many are angry at iOS fans because they enable Apple, which is seemingly trying to do to mobile devices what VZW and AT&T are trying to do to wireless service -- use regulatory capture to wipe out the competition and leave consumers with little choice. And even iOS' most blind devotees should be able to see, ironic pun intended, that lack of competition would be bad for Apple innovation.

 

AJ

 

AJ, that is a very valid couterpoint and I just wish I would see more of that kind of response coming from the anti-Apple side. My guess would be that the folks with the kinds of concerns you express are in the minority.

 

Many of Apple's current business practices are open to criticism and should be a part of the discussion on their space in the marketplace. Unfortunately, that gets lost in all the "look at those mindless sheep" sort of commentary.

 

What you said about lack of competition being bad for Apple innovation seems to fit right in line with the mindset described in your Tragedy of the Commons post. Apple devotees cheer Apple hamstringing Samsung, Google, et al., but they don't see how that actually harms themselves in the long run. If Apple clears the marketplace there is no longer any impetus to innovate other than whatever internal drive is left in the corporate culture. With no competition for consumer dollars that inner creative drive quickly loses out to the profit driven side of the business.

 

The larger discussion in my mind is how do we rightfully protect intellectual property without stifling a creative industry that is driven, in many cases, by borrowing and tweaking ideas?

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Look how Apple is falling behind on innovation already, and they are in a competitive environment. Just imagine how they would fall behind on innovation without competition? It scares me, actually.

 

The only thing innovative of note in the new iPhone is antenna design. And that is not a competition with others thing, as it was an Apple desire to minimize parts across one device and possibly reduce costs in the long run. It wasn't done as a feature enhancement to better compete in the marketplace. Far from it.

 

In fact, this may be the biggest cause why the CDMA versions do not support simultaneous voice/data. So I'm not sure it is an innovation step at all. It may be a step backwards.

 

Robert via CM9 Kindle Fire using Forum Runner

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The more I think about this the more I see that Apple has realized that once you establish yourself in the marketplace as an innovator and create a demand that wholly disconnected from the specs of a particular device then you don't need to continue to revolutionize to be successful.

 

If Apple can grab 2 million pre-orders in 24 hours on a device that doesn't have NFC, simultaneous voice and data over LTE, a true HD display or any number of the other features that techies drool over why would they decide to do anything differently? If I were an Apple shareholder I would want them to keep doing what they're doing until the marketplace makes them do something differently.

 

I work in what is essentially a service industry. We manufacture a product but at our essence we provide a specialized service for our clients. Most in our industry compete on price. We are able to charge a higher price than many of our competitors for what is essentially the same product/service because we have created a unique value to our clients. Some of it is actual value and some of it is perceived value. Some clients that we pursue don't work with us because they shop strictly by price. Any other value is meaningless to them. We rarely pursue those clients and we don't spend our time concerned with satisfying their demands.

 

Most of the folks I see screaming about what the iPhone 5 is lacking are folks who probably would never by an Apple product anyway. So if it doesn't matter to your core customers and the people to whom it does matter likely wouldn't buy your products anyway, why bother?

 

Anyway, this is all good stuff but all I really want to know is if my Evo will be able to connect to LTE reliably once it is live in my area. Can you help a brotha out on that score??

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Odell you are quite correct. It all has to do with the things you value which is why it people just talk over each other sometimes... They value different things but each approaches the problem as if they agreed on value.

 

I don't want to make security decisions about my phone. I hate that stupid permissions dialog on Android and that automatically disqualifies it from my life. It's not because I don't understand them, I'm just offended as a developer because I know 99.9% of all users have no clue what those permissions really mean or whether they should approve them or not. They just tap Yes. Same reason they hit OK to install random ActiveX controls on IE 6 and got infected with malware. I also love that AirPlay just works, zero configuration. I love that when my iPhone 5 arrives today and I sign in with iCloud I will get all my apps, music, settings, data, etc automatically with no work on my part to switch phones. I love that when my fiancé dropped her phone in the pool the local Apple store genius just gave us a new one at no cost, which is service you can't get with anyone else. I love the attention to detail, the fit and finish of both hardware and software.

 

 

So the point is I value simplicity. I deal with complexity in the code I write, I don't need more of it in my life. My time is very limited these days so customization, rooting, widgets, etc (all strengths of Android) are completely useless to me personally. Almost no stores are using NFC, there are different incompatible implementations, etc so I find it useless. I don't need to beam stuff to people as iCloud automatically syncs apps and media between my Wife's phone and mine. Given that, it's no wonder I prefer Apple products. It's also no surprise that some people love their Android phones because they have the time and enjoy fiddling with it. Neither choice is right or wrong. Android just offers nothing of value to me - only additional headaches, with the "bonus" of having to waste my investment in the iOS ecosystem.

 

 

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Odell you are quite correct. It all has to do with the things you value which is why it people just talk over each other sometimes... They value different things but each approaches the problem as if they agreed on value.

 

I don't want to make security decisions about my phone. I hate that stupid permissions dialog on Android and that automatically disqualifies it from my life. It's not because I don't understand them, I'm just offended as a developer because I know 99.9% of all users have no clue what those permissions really mean or whether they should approve them or not. They just tap Yes. Same reason they hit OK to install random ActiveX controls on IE 6 and got infected with malware. I also love that AirPlay just works, zero configuration. I love that when my iPhone 5 arrives today and I sign in with iCloud I will get all my apps, music, settings, data, etc automatically with no work on my part to switch phones. I love that when my fiancé dropped her phone in the pool the local Apple store genius just gave us a new one at no cost, which is service you can't get with anyone else. I love the attention to detail, the fit and finish of both hardware and software.

 

 

So the point is I value simplicity. I deal with complexity in the code I write, I don't need more of it in my life. My time is very limited these days so customization, rooting, widgets, etc (all strengths of Android) are completely useless to me personally. Almost no stores are using NFC, there are different incompatible implementations, etc so I find it useless. I don't need to beam stuff to people as iCloud automatically syncs apps and media between my Wife's phone and mine. Given that, it's no wonder I prefer Apple products. It's also no surprise that some people love their Android phones because they have the time and enjoy fiddling with it. Neither choice is right or wrong. Android just offers nothing of value to me - only additional headaches, with the "bonus" of having to waste my investment in the iOS ecosystem.

 

These are valid points. I just appreciate the customization and faster adoption rate of new technologies of Android over the points you outline. I am glad I still have a choice in products that allows me to be able to decide which product is best for me. I hope it always stays that way. Even if Android does not always meet my needs, I would like to be able to choose who my next OS/OEM is. Not be limited to one, or even just two choices.

 

Robert

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