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Let's get serious about this proposed US Cellular buyout.


Stew503
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In the Montana thread it was discussed how US Cellular would be the perfect acquisition for Sprint to pursue. I wanted to dedicate a thread to this topic in hopes that it will build up momentum and influence the execs at Softbank and Sprint to actually do it and do it quickly. It's been in the news that USCC has been losing subs quarter after quarter and if Sprint doesn't act soon one of the other three tier 1s will buyout USCC.

Edited by COZisBack
Changed from Wyoming to Montana
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Just a hunch but I am guessing Softbank/Sprint does not make acquisition decisions based on a thread on a message board.  I am sure they look at all possible acquisition targets and if everything makes sense (synergies, financials, regulatory issues, ect) they will pull the trigger.  

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I really wish it would happen, assuming they maintain the USCC network and not just shut it down.  The coverage for USCC is decent for southern maine but i was up north last month and it was crazy good.  Like LTE in the middle of no where, every where i went good.

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I agree USC would be a good option for Sprint to buy and the FCC would most likely approve it since USC sold there home market in Chicago, IL already.  The Cricket Wireless (was first Leap Wireless) would of been another good one to buy out, even though Sprint covered all of the areas already BUt would of given them more spectrum, not by much, oh well At&t has it now. Same with Metro PCS now T-mobile has that.  Another really good one is N-Telos.  Just my opinion thats all.

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With Sprints new CCA/RRPP agreements, is this needed?  I mean - there are USCC towers in nearly every town in this area, but Sprint's agreement with Illinois Valley Cellular really would make it largely unnecessary for any USCC action in this area.  Buuuuut - with that being said - Sprint did already snatch up the USCC Spectrum in central Illinois, so maybe it's just a matter of time... ?

Interesting arguments from both sides.  :)  I am literally playing devils advocate with myself.  hah!

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With Sprints new CCA/RRPP agreements, is this needed? I mean - there are USCC towers in nearly every town in this area, but Sprint's agreement with Illinois Valley Cellular really would make it largely unnecessary for any USCC action in this area. Buuuuut - with that being said - Sprint did already snatch up the USCC Spectrum in central Illinois, so maybe it's just a matter of time... ?

 

Interesting arguments from both sides. :) I am literally playing devils advocate with myself. hah!

Ha. I was thinking the same but remember the other 3 wireless carriers are looking to expand so it will be better if sprint bought rather than the other guys.

 

Us cellular would be chump change compared to buying tmobile and acquiring them wouldn't slow things down.

 

Idk if sprint will need the AWS licenses though. Maybe sell it to Dish in exchange for H block spectrum or keep it and form the a wireless hosting deal with Dish.

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Ha. I was thinking the same but remember the other 3 wireless carriers are looking to expand so it will be better if sprint bought rather than the other guys.

 

Us cellular would be chump change compared to buying tmobile and acquiring them wouldn't slow things down.

 

Idk if sprint will need the AWS licenses though. Maybe sell it to Dish in exchange for H block spectrum or keep it and form the a wireless hosting deal with Dish.

 

They probably sell all the AWS to T-Mobile or AT&T. 

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Since Sprint is adding B4 to its device lineup soon, might as well keep all AWS pick ups for use.  Especially in areas already deployed by the company you purchase.  And then in the future, after you have converted B4 sites to Network Vision and added common Sprint LTE bands, you could then decommission B4 easily if you have spectrum cap issues and quickly jettison that spectrum.

 

Robert

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Just a hunch but I am guessing Softbank/Sprint does not make acquisition decisions based on a thread on a message board.  I am sure they look at all possible acquisition targets and if everything makes sense (synergies, financials, regulatory issues, ect) they will pull the trigger.  

I am Masayoshi Son.

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I have a friend who use to work at US Cellular in Chicago.  His comments are how they are hurting financially  and need help. Sprint has already bought some of US Cellular spectrum, so it doesn't seem a big leap to buyout the remainder of the company.

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They probably sell all the AWS to T-Mobile or AT&T. 

Or swap it for PCS that in markets where they are PCS poor. They won't even need additional equipment to make use of it.

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I wonder if the CCA/RRPP agreements include a Sprint right of first refusal if any partner decides to put itself up for sale.

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I'll echo what GoBigRed79 said and add this thread from the Howard Forums that seems to have covered quite a bit of the information already:

http://www.howardforums.com/showthread.php/1843922-Sprint-US-Cellular-merger/page4

Thanks for the link cletus. Here is a post from that link that I liked so much I had to share.

 

 

 

[http://www]

 

NGeorge said:08-21-2014 01:07 AM

 

I'm firmly in the Sprint/USCC merger camp... it only makes perfect sense to me. Sprint IMMEDIATELY solves their rural issue in many, many important areas with a PRL change for 3G-- and the USCC LTE network is solidly built out on Band 5, which is a subset of Band 26--they had to do this for the iPhone.

 

Not only does it solve their rural issue in many areas, it SOLIDLY solves it -- USCC has built out in many areas that the Big 2 STILL haven't touched. They'd also inherit all the retail presence in the rural areas to support it -- and would have the national network to back it up, which is one of the BIG gripes about USCC subs: You leave the licensed market, you have 200 meg roaming caps and 1x data at that. They'd probably get most subs to upgrade to a new Sprint phone just based on that promise alone. 

 

Adding MFBI to it can't be any worse than when Sprint had to add eCSfB across their entire network, which actually went fairly quickly, considering. The bigger issue I think would be getting USCC's NSN equipment to play nice with Sprint's existing Samsung and ALU equipment where it overlaps (don't think USCC is in any Ericsson areas for Sprint)

 

As for all that 700a and a tiny bit of AWS -- I don't see any reason why they wouldn't immediately spin it off--probably mostly to T-Mobile--and make a few bucks of their investment back, or possible trade for some smaller chunks of PCS in more urban areas where they need it. They absolutely wouldn't need the 700 or AWS considering they already have unused SMR across the entire USCC footprint--in fact, a lot of USCC CLR is in the A Band, which could open up some interesting opportunities to offer higher speed LTE with low band spectrum in rural areas that otherwise would never see 2.5: SMR and the A Band are contiguous. Once the USCC subs have upgraded to new handsets, they can start clearing some of the CDMA out of CLR -- keeping their single channel of 1x at the low end of SMR and a couple of EV-DO and 1x channels at the top of the A Band gives a contiguous 30 mhz. slice between SMR and A (the total combined is around 37-40 mhz. depending on the area) -- which could either mean up to 15x15 or (more plausible since I don't think existing Sprint phones are wideband) a 5x5 in SMR and a 10x10 in the CLR (which they could then do in the B areas as well)...

 

So the biggest question is whether the Carlsons are ready to sell... Either they need to sell out to Sprint since I can't see their situation getting better or B. get REALLY CLOSE with Sprint in the CCA so that USCC can offer the illusion that they have a national network through "roam like home" and Sprint can do the same on USCC -- and with a proviso that Sprint gets first dibs if they do eventually sell so a repeat of Alltel doesn't happen and Sprint loses all this coverage again if someone else pulls the trigger first... 

 

N

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) -which could either mean up to 15x15 or (more plausible since I don't think existing Sprint phones are wideband)

All modern LTE phones support every carrier width. There is no special setup for 15x15 and 20x20 widths. "Wideband" is just a marketing moniker that T-Mobile is using. LTE specs don't designate anything as "wideband."
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All modern LTE phones support every carrier width. There is no special setup for 15x15 and 20x20 widths. "Wideband" is just a marketing moniker that T-Mobile is using. LTE specs don't designate anything as "wideband."

 

Define "modern LTE phones" -- because I can tell you with utter certainty that not all devices have been configured, tested, and authorized for all carrier bandwidths (1.4/3/5/10/15/20 MHz FDD) in all supported bands.  That is particularly true of Sprint handsets.

 

AJ

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Define "modern LTE phones" -- because I can tell you with utter certainty that not all devices have been configured, tested, and authorized for all carrier bandwidths (1.4/3/5/10/15/20 MHz FDD) in all supported bands. That is particularly true of Sprint handsets.

 

AJ

Lets say the current flagship lineup.
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This only makes sense if they are trying to keep freedom pop out of somebody else's hands and if they roll freedom pop, virgin and boost into one unit.

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This only makes sense if they are trying to keep freedom pop out of somebody else's hands and if they roll freedom pop, virgin and boost into one unit.

 

They don't have to buy it. They just launch a similar product under Virgin Mobile / Boost brand as they did in Virgin Mobile Custom

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They don't have to buy it. They just launch a similar product under Virgin Mobile / Boost brand as they did in Virgin Mobile Custom

The problem is if somebody else buys freedom pop then Sprint potentially looses a MVNO that pays them money.

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The problem is if somebody else buys freedom pop then Sprint potentially looses a MVNO that pays them money.

 

But now Sprint is on the hook for those "free" plans including those "free" devices

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If someone buys FreedomPOP, Sprint would have the right to cancel the MVNO. And that might be the purchasers plan. Sprint's not on the hook for anything.

 

If it was a big provider, they would probably want to move the Freedom POP business model to their own network. AT&T (or whomever) would not want a subsidiary that is a Sprint MVNO.

 

Robert via Samsung Note 8.0 using Tapatalk Pro

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