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now network upgrades are going until 2014?


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I believe Virgin Mobile's old coverage map( before they switched to the interactive map) said they covered around 280 million people, so this sounds like their plans include some expansion, but that could be just the number they get with 800mhz added to towers.

 

ATT is suppose to have 300 million people with LTE by 2014 as well, so Sprint could match ATT's LTE coverage. This would definitely be great news for consumers who are looking for a better alternative to the duopoly.

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In his cutomer

www.phonearena.com/news/Sprint-gives-us-its-State-of-the-network-report_id37941

 

Says they be covering 250 mill ppl by the end of 2013 and 300mill in 2014. I wonder how many ppl they actually cover right now.

 

In the Sprint newsletter, Hesse says:

 

"We expect the build out to be largely complete by the end of 2013, bringing you improved coverage, greater capacity and faster data speeds."

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In regard to the title of this thread, finishing in 2014 has always been the plan. In fact, when network vision was originally conceived, sprint predicted it would not finish until 2015. They accelerated those completion estimates when the other carriers started announcing their 4g plans and sprint saw ways to secure funding to pay for an accelerated schedule. The current projection has always had them finishing in 2014.

 

 

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Expect nearly full coverage in most Top 100 cities by the end of 2013. Also, they will have some coverage available in all 97 markets by the end of 2013. The first two quarters of 2014 will be about adding density and picking up errant uncompleted towers.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

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Sounds good. I also was under the impression that they would be done by the end of 2013. This makes me wonder how long it will take for them to put 800 CDMA and 800 LTE in place. I assume 800 advanced will go on every tower possible and 800 LTE goes on 80% of towers. According to Robert all they have to do is plug in a device and do a bit of testing to get it up in running but how long will it take for them to do all 38,000 towers again. I'm thinking this would add another quarter to the NV completion schedule.

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Sounds good. I also was under the impression that they would be done by the end of 2013. This makes me wonder how long it will take for them to put 800 CDMA and 800 LTE in place. I assume 800 advanced will go on every tower possible and 800 LTE goes on 80% of towers. According to Robert all they have to do is plug in a device and do a bit of testing to get it up in running but how long will it take for them to do all 38,000 towers again. I'm thinking this would add another quarter to the NV completion schedule.

 

800 LTE is Network Vision 2.0 It is not part of the original Network Vision project, but will take less time to build out than this implementation. I'm hoping that by the end of 2014 they will be close to being done with NV 2.0

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Says they be covering 250 mill ppl by the end of 2013 and 300mill in 2014. I wonder how many ppl they actually cover right now.

 

I wish Sprint would use square miles instead of people, as people move around, home and work and inbetween, doesn't make sense. If I'm not covered at home, at work (unless I stand on the roof), am I covered? I wouldn't count it.

Square miles should be used. :)

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800 LTE is Network Vision 2.0 It is not part of the original Network Vision project, but will take less time to build out than this implementation. I'm hoping that by the end of 2014 they will be close to being done with NV 2.0

 

What all does NV 2.0 involves? I'm going to guess 2500 LTE goes along with NV 2.0

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I don't expect LTE in middle Georgia until late 2014 at best. Too rural, not enough subs to make the difference.

 

My contacts at Windstream and Cox say they are taking fiber to Sprint sites now, but it's going to take them a while. It took 4 months to get fiber into my data center... so they're having to plow in new stuff to many sites.

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I don't expect LTE in middle Georgia until late 2014 at best. Too rural, not enough subs to make the difference.

 

My contacts at Windstream and Cox say they are taking fiber to Sprint sites now, but it's going to take them a while. It took 4 months to get fiber into my data center... so they're having to plow in new stuff to many sites.

 

If your expectation is late 2014, then you will be pleased. Because they will beat that by a country mile. The Georgia market is already under deployment.

 

Robert via Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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If your expectation is late 2014, then you will be pleased. Because they will beat that by a country mile. The Georgia market is already under deployment.

 

Robert via Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2

 

I will admit this... there are some new panels on the ground at a site in Warner Robins, GA, that I pass daily. I'll try to take a minute and stop to get photos of them.

 

However, fiber deployment is a problem, based on talks with the folks who are doing it. It'll be a while.

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I will admit this... there are some new panels on the ground at a site in Warner Robins, GA, that I pass daily. I'll try to take a minute and stop to get photos of them.

 

However, fiber deployment is a problem, based on talks with the folks who are doing it. It'll be a while.

 

Most NV backhaul is AAV, with a mix of fiber and MW making up the rest.

 

Robert via Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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Most NV backhaul is AAV, with a mix of fiber and MW making up the rest.

 

Robert via Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2

 

Windstream and Cox are both working fiber for sites... some are easy for them, as they've already done Verizon.

 

I'm not really up on what the NV panels look like, so I'll post some photos this coming week... I don't think it's a Sprint site already, but there are new antennas inside the fence in the past 2 days. These have 2 "something" (could be radios) on the back... when I can get photos, I guess you guys can fill us in.

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Windstream and Cox are both working fiber for sites... some are easy for them, as they've already done Verizon.

 

I'm not really up on what the NV panels look like, so I'll post some photos this coming week... I don't think it's a Sprint site already, but there are new antennas inside the fence in the past 2 days. These have 2 "something" (could be radios) on the back... when I can get photos, I guess you guys can fill us in.

 

Check out the New Orleans thread in the market section. I just posted some pictures with some close ups.

 

Sent from a little old Note 2

 

 

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Check out the New Orleans thread in the market section. I just posted some pictures with some close ups.

 

Sent from a little old Note 2

I looked, I don't think those are the same panels... will post photos when I get a chance.

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I don't expect LTE in middle Georgia until late 2014 at best. Too rural, not enough subs to make the difference.

 

My contacts at Windstream and Cox say they are taking fiber to Sprint sites now, but it's going to take them a while. It took 4 months to get fiber into my data center... so they're having to plow in new stuff to many sites.

 

Sprint isn't deploying based on the amount of subs they have in an area but the time in which it can be converted. Sprint will be completely done with NV by mid 2014. So no market will have to wait until the end of 2014, actually they will be done with NV 2.0 by then.

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Fortunately, I know they already have fiber to at least the Verizon tower in my town, saw them running it. I can't get close enough to the sprint tower to find out. It is surrounded by trees and accessible only by a private driveway. But I know that area has fiber to the home available, so should be no big thing.

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I honestly don't see what's to complain about here to be honest. If you read back they initially projected something like 2015 to be complete... To be able to bump up schedule 2 yrs possibly was amazing, thus having it trickle into 2014 is no big deal...

 

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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Fortunately, I know they already have fiber to at least the Verizon tower in my town, saw them running it. I can't get close enough to the sprint tower to find out. It is surrounded by trees and accessible only by a private driveway. But I know that area has fiber to the home available, so should be no big thing.

 

Fiber is not a public resource. It is all private owned. Sprint cannot just tap into any nearby fiber line. Sprint contracted out all the backhaul to dozens of vendors nationwide. A company won the backhaul bid for the tower you are referring to. Sprint gave them performance criteria that the company must meet, including speed, latency, down time and scalability for future upgrade.

 

The company that won can then deploy whatever backhaul makes sense for the location. As long as it meets the performance requirements and scalable for more in the future. It can be direct fiber, indirect fiber, AAV, or microwave.

 

If the fiber nearby is owned by a company that has unreasonable terms then they will persue AAV or MW for backhaul. Adjacency of fiber is no guarantee it can or will be used.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

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Fiber is not a public resource. It is all private owned. Sprint cannot just tap into any nearby fiber line. Sprint contracted out all the backhaul to dozens of vendors nationwide. A company won the backhaul bid for the tower you are referring to. Sprint gave them performance criteria that the company must meet, including speed, latency, down time and scalability for future upgrade.

 

 

 

 

The company that won can then deploy whatever backhaul makes sense for the location. As long as it meets the performance requirements and scalable for more in the future. It can be direct fiber, indirect fiber, AAV, or microwave.

 

If the fiber nearby is owned by a company that has unreasonable terms then they will persue AAV or MW for backhaul. Adjacency of fiber is no guarantee it can or will be used.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

I understand and know that already. It is owned by a private rural monopoly. No other phone companies to provide alternatives anywhere nearby. I understand it must meet requirements as well. I am only referring to the fact that if they use that option, it should not be a problem as it is near already and it met Verizon's requirements.

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