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I was curious as to how many POPs Sprint's whole network covered whether it's 1x, EVDO, FDD-LTE or TD-LTE. I looked online and could not really find a straight answer to this question probably because no one cares about 3G anymore. Does anyone know?

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I was curious as to how many POPs Sprint's whole network covered whether it's 1x, EVDO, FDD-LTE or TD-LTE. I looked online and could not really find a straight answer to this question probably because no one cares about 3G anymore. Does anyone know?

 

Its been discussed in other topics on here

 

I'm sure it's over 300M pops...but I don't think Sprint has mentioned total voice coverage since they've done 800Mhz 1x over most of their footprint.

Its been discussed in other topics

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I'm sure it's over 300M pops...but I don't think Sprint has mentioned total voice coverage since they've done 800Mhz 1x over most of their footprint.

 

I think 800 on 1X only improves existing coverage. It does not go beyond Sprint's existing footprint (maybe a little bit but not huge)

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As of June 30, 2014 Sprint's network covered 283 Million people. As we all know, thanks to new sites, 800MHz, RRPP, etc, that number is greater than that by now. It's more than likely not 300 Million as someone stated earlier. Although it's in the pipeline to bring Sprint to that amount of POP's covered sooner than later.

 

We simply don't have any current numbers (I don't think) but the government should release an updated count after the end of this month if they do this on a yearly cycle.

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Sprint owns enough 800MHz to cover virtually the whole United States.

And San Bernardino uses enough 800Mhz to ensure that half of California and almost the entire population of Nevada can't use it! Yay for all the 100 desert folks in that County (I know this is a gross understatement of the pop. but it sure feels this way when you drive through it).

 

Sorry... Couldn't resist.

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Its been discussed in other topics on here

 

Its been discussed in other topics

That's awesome, but new people don't know that. So try not to spam ;).

OT: 1x 800 extended coverage, so I'm imagining alone 1x 800 helped cover more ground than before.

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As of June 30, 2014 Sprint's network covered 283 Million people. As we all know, thanks to new sites, 800MHz, RRPP, etc, that number is greater than that by now. It's more than likely not 300 Million as someone stated earlier. Although it's in the pipeline to bring Sprint to that amount of POP's covered sooner than later.

 

We simply don't have any current numbers (I don't think) but the government should release an updated count after the end of this month if they do this on a yearly cycle.

 

The government does not measure Sprint's covered POPs.

 

AJ

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The government does not measure Sprint's covered POPs.

 

AJ

 

It seems as though what you said isn't exactly true. The link provided says "Created and maintained by the NTIA, in collaboration with the FCC" at the bottom of the page. It's more of a guesstimation that they do for nearly every carrier and cable co in the country. The numbers are fairly accurate considering what the carriers advertise.

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I think AJ's point is that National POP's is not used by the government for requirements of licensing, enforcement or in any metric to manage wireless carriers in whole. However, the government certainly can be made aware and maybe even cite these numbers.

 

Sometimes wireless providers even quote POP's in applications, etc. But not because it was a requirement on the form, but rather the wireless provider thought it made a compelling case in the submission for some point of justification.

 

Using Nexus 6 on Tapatalk

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I think AJ's point is that National POP's is not used by the government for requirements of licensing, enforcement or in any metric to manage wireless carriers in whole. However, the government certainly can be made aware and maybe even cite these numbers.

 

Sometimes wireless providers even quote POP's in applications, etc. But not because it was a requirement on the form, but rather the wireless provider thought it made a compelling case in the submission for some point of justification.

 

Using Nexus 6 on Tapatalk

 

Now I see what he meant. It was a simple misunderstanding!

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I think AJ's point is that National POP's is not used by the government for requirements of licensing, enforcement or in any metric to manage wireless carriers in whole. However, the government certainly can be made aware and maybe even cite these numbers.

 

Sometimes wireless providers even quote POP's in applications, etc. But not because it was a requirement on the form, but rather the wireless provider thought it made a compelling case in the submission for some point of justification.

 

Using Nexus 6 on Tapatalk

dont they own ESMR licenses outside of their own native foot print

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dont they own ESMR licenses outside of their own native foot print

They own it nationwide. I'm not sure where you're going with this, though. What does that have to do with the government doesn't use POP's on a national level as any means of enforcement?

 

Using Nexus 6 on Tapatalk

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They own it nationwide. I'm not sure where you're going with this, though. What does that have to do with the government doesn't use POP's on a national level as any means of enforcement?

 

Using Nexus 6 on Tapatalk

what i am trying to say is ...doesnt the ESMR band they own have build out requirements to cover a certain POPS

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dont they own ESMR licenses outside of their own native foot print

Just because they own the licence, doesn't mean they will provide service to every square foot of that area. The government gives terms for licenses that a company must cover a certain %of population to retain ownership of the license, but in most cases a few strategically placed towers in a city can meet the requirement for an entire licence. (The whole purpose of protection sites)

 

To get back to what I think your question actually was addressing, they are only adding 800Mhz to their current towers for now & therefore will not be significantly adding to their coverage. Service will be better in the areas they currently serve, and they will be able to more successfully add coverage in the future as they do own the licenses that nearly blanket the country.

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Just because they own the licence, doesn't mean they will provide service to every square foot of that area. The government gives terms for licenses that a company must cover a certain %of population to retain ownership of the license, but in most cases a few strategically placed towers in a city can meet the requirement for an entire licence. (The whole purpose of protection sites)

 

To get back to what I think your question actually was addressing, they are only adding 800Mhz to their current towers for now & therefore will not be significantly adding to their coverage. Service will be better in the areas they currently serve, and they will be able to more successfully add coverage in the future as they do own the licenses that nearly blanket the country.

Yes that's what I was trying to get ...so they only need a few well placed towers to cover a area
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Yes that's what I was trying to get ...so they only need a few well placed towers to cover a area

 

It depends on what you mean by that, to officially have coverage and retain ownership of the license, yes. Everything beyond that depends on geography of the area, structures & level of service you wish to provide. Also consider what the competition has to offer to compete with & regional travel habits of potential customers. Basic coverage and acceptable level of service might be 2 different things.

Also to expand upon what I think Robert was trying to say, sprint does not need to expand coverage to satisfy government requirements (other than possibly Montana).

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Yeah, Sprint met ESMR build out requirements a long long time ago.

 

And build out requirements are not measured in nationwide POP's. Build out requirements are either a minimum square mileage within a license or license population.

 

Using Tapatalk on Nexus 6

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Yeah, Sprint met ESMR build out requirements a long long time ago.

 

And build out requirements are not measured in nationwide POP's. Build out requirements are either a minimum square mileage within a license or license population.

 

Using Tapatalk on Nexus 6

hmm ok that makes sense and also does the nexus 6 work great on Sprint I may want to get one ...and also ESMR is there a power output limit mandated by the fcc
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