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Sprint testing Samsung, Alcatel-Lucent indoor small cells


IamMrFamous07

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Sprint (NYSE:S) has received LTE-enabled small cells from its infrastructure vendors Alcatel-Lucent (NYSE:ALU) and Samsung and is testing the devices for planned deployment.

 

"We are currently testing indoor picos for both vendors. We haven't announced a deployment timeline yet," Sprint spokeswoman Kelly Schlageter told FierceWirelessTech.

 

She added that the picocells are designed for use on Sprint's FDD LTE network in the 1.9 GHz band.

 

 

 

Read more: Sprint testing Samsung, Alcatel-Lucent indoor small cells - FierceWirelessTech http://www.fiercewireless.com/tech/story/sprint-testing-samsung-alcatel-lucent-indoor-small-cells/2013-10-27#ixzz2j4X2FNeT

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They've been talking about small cells since NV started, so this isn't exactly breaking news, but at least it's confirmation that Sprint is still going to deploy them.

 

The real take away for me here is that they didn't list Ericsson even though they have a small cell solution (although I don't know if it would work for Sprint).

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Let's skip indoor 1900 and go straight to 2600 :-)

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk

 

 

 

I just don't get the 2600 thing. Why would ppl push so hard for a band that doesn't travel as far or have good penetration. I understand using it to offload user from other bands to free up congestion. 800 should be priority to me.

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I just don't get the 2600 thing. Why would ppl push so hard for a band that doesn't travel as far or have good penetration. I understand using it to offload user from other bands to free up congestion. 800 should be priority to me.

 

For indoor small cells the 2600 thing (as well as 1900 apparently) is actually an ideal solution. 

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I just don't get the 2600 thing. Why would ppl push so hard for a band that doesn't travel as far or have good penetration. I understand using it to offload user from other bands to free up congestion. 800 should be priority to me.

The indoor small cells are supposed to fill in the band 41 gaps in coverage. Having and indoor 800 site would kinda be redundant. would you want it penetrate walls to go back outside where there should already be coverage?

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk

 

 

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How "big" of an area are they using small cella for, are we talking for a small neighborhood, or a high volume store, shopping centers? I think aomething that could help would residence offering to let sprint use their property, say on top of the roof, to install and feed fiber too, a small cell for lower coverage area/poor performance area? Would that even be possible?

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You see I live in a wooded area. Would like to have some coverage more out side of my house. 800 Could help in a place like a hospital where you might need to penetrate several walls it to get coverage through out a building and you would need less small cell sites to keep cost down. Beside if coverage to much, you can always turn down the power. I think see the benefit of this also seeing how the Airave 2.5 Plus has band 26 in it.  If Band 26 wasn't a benefit then they would have just left it as Band 25.

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I just don't get the 2600 thing. Why would ppl push so hard for a band that doesn't travel as far or have good penetration. I understand using it to offload user from other bands to free up congestion. 800 should be priority to me.

Because lte 2600 is going to be the band that's going to give sprint amazing speeds. Speed wise, sprint lte on 800 and 1900 won't be able to produce amazing speeds like you see with the other carriers and lte 2600 is designed for heavy capacity which the others bands are not.

 

Just the basis of it.

 

 

Sprint plans to get more power band spectrum (600 mhz) but the auction won't be until 2014 or 2015 I think

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Budweiser, Scotts, Nestle, Avon and Wendy's all have Picos here in Columbus that have been 3G accepted and some have Scheduled LTE 1.9 dates. I'm not sure who the vendor is, but they have them rocking already.

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I think the idea here is that the 1900 MHZ antennas will impact the highest number of subscribers with Sprint LTE. The user base at this point has been using 1900 LTE devices for over a year, and we are only now starting to see dual and tri band handsets. Also, as far as signal strength for these indoor deployments is concerned, tweaking the power settings should eliminate any shortfalls.

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So are we talking about maybe a new Airave or strictly for places like big buildings? I would love to get an Airave LTE! :)

 

While a new airave is possible in the future, I think this testing is for larger equipment.

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For indoor small cells the 2600 thing (as well as 1900 apparently) is actually an ideal solution. 

 

I think you are right. I can't see 800 being deployed anywhere but large (tower) sites. 

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I have a 2.5+ right now and there's no 800mhz cdma...

I believe I've read that the 2.5+ is transmitting an 800SMR Beacon.  Your device may not be able to connect to it, but it seems to be capable of it.  Perhaps someone more "in-the-know" will chime in.

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So are we talking about maybe a new Airave or strictly for places like big buildings? I would love to get an Airave LTE! :)

I've seen several people saying this, but if you have an Airave you already have DSL or cable broadband, so why in the world would you need LTE?

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I've seen several people saying this, but if you have an Airave you already have DSL or cable broadband, so why in the world would you need LTE?

To abuse the network? Duh.... (Just kidding, that would be pretty stupid of me, and it aint right)

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've seen several people saying this, but if you have an Airave you already have DSL or cable broadband, so why in the world would you need LTE?

Well let's take it out of the home setting and put it into the commercial setting: shopping malls, airports, subways, college campuses, corporate warehouses and distribution centers (say Limited Brands which I know for sure). These are all locations that maybe you just don't want to have public WiFi. Now you have an indoor pico type system with one connection to the internet or to the carrier. You as the facility owner don't have to worry about IP addressing, network security nor anything else because it's all on the carrier. 

 

A buddy of mine just finished deploying one of these systems for all the carriers at the Atlanta Airport.

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Well let's take it out of the home setting and put it into the commercial setting: shopping malls, airports, subways, college campuses, corporate warehouses and distribution centers (say Limited Brands which I know for sure). These are all locations that maybe you just don't want to have public WiFi. Now you have an indoor pico type system with one connection to the internet or to the carrier. You as the facility owner don't have to worry about IP addressing, network security nor anything else because it's all on the carrier.

 

A buddy of mine just finished deploying one of these systems for all the carriers at the Atlanta Airport.

Okay, the concept of small cells I get and that makes perfect sense. But I don't think an actual Airave would work for that because you can only have a limited number of connections to it at once.

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I believe I've read that the 2.5+ is transmitting an 800SMR Beacon.  Your device may not be able to connect to it, but it seems to be capable of it.  Perhaps someone more "in-the-know" will chime in.

 

It broadcasts essentially a beacon on 800Mhz so your phone will connect to the Airave even if there is a tower close enough for your phone to see that 800MHz signal. The actual connection made with the Airave is still 1900MHz, but that 800 beacon means the Airave will be prioritized even if another 800 signal is detected (since it will likely be more powerful than the macro signal).

 

This is because some phones prioritize 800 over 1900, and were thus switching back and forth between a macro 800 signal and the Airave 1900 signal causing the exact issues an Airave is designed to avoid.

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