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Cheyenne to Denver 72 fiber cable cut photos, Front Range flooding


Geesmill
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Some photos from the cable cut on the Cheyenne to Denver backbone fiber due to the flooding in Northern Colorado.

 

"Cheyenne to Denver Via Kersey Colorado fiber cut on along CR-53. North Platte River, well over flood stages, has cut the 72 count cable. You can see the conduit in the back ground floating on top of the water, the river should have only been a couple hundred feet from bank to bank, but on this day the river had increased to upwards of 1/2 mile."

 

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Down here in Albuquerque, we did not get the amount of rain Colorado received, but crazy to see pictures of the Rio Grande over its banks in over flow areas. I don't know if I have ever seen that in the 25 years here in ABQ.

 

I have never seen water in the arroyos between Santa Fe and ABQ before.  They all are running pretty good.  I never remember the Rio Galisteo below La Bajada ever having more than a trickle of water, but on Saturday it looked like a real river.  Same for the Santa Fe River.

 

On Friday evening, the arroyo in the canyon up to Los Alamos was overflowing its banks and they had to shut down the Totavi gas station and evacuate.  It looked like it had as much flow as the Rio Grande in normal conditions.  Crazy stuff, but much better than Colorado.  I think the arroyo system works pretty well for 25 year events.  :tu:

 

Robert

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Someone is pretty brave on taking those pics!  Several of those pics kinda scream "you can't get there from here!"  ;)

I think there is a lot of that going on in Northern Colorado. I had some friends in Fort Collins for the weekend and couldn't get out for a few days.

 

There are still quite a few closures on cotrip.org

 

http://cotrip.org/roadConditions.htm

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It is really a blessing in disguise. (sort of green rant) The water tables in those areas are getting quite low.  In the areas that tap into those water sources and for the folks well towards the ends of those rivers, this means more water for them.  This concerns me more on the agricultural side of things since that is my forte. (/sort of green rant)
 

Outside of that i hope those that are still stuck are safe.

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It is really a blessing in disguise. (sort of green rant) The water tables in those areas are getting quite low.  In the areas that tap into those water sources and for the folks well towards the ends of those rivers, this means more water for them.  This concerns me more on the agricultural side of things since that is my forte. (/sort of green rant)

 

Outside of that i hope those that are still stuck are safe.

Most definitely the water is needed. The flows on the rivers down where I live are up but nothing like the eastern plains and front range.

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And to think I was *this* close to accepting a job in Fort Collins.

 

Robert via Samsung Galaxy Note 8.0 using Tapatalk

 

Fort Collins is a great town.  Small town feel, with access to Denver and hourly flights to all corners of the earth hourly.  

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And to think I was *this* close to accepting a job in Fort Collins.

 

Robert via Samsung Galaxy Note 8.0 using Tapatalk

 

Where at?

 

Fort Collins is a great town.  Small town feel, with access to Denver and hourly flights to all corners of the earth hourly.  

 

Yeah, it is a great town, I am a student at Colorado State University in Fort Collins. We were kind of like an island during the flooding.  The only places really affected were by the Poudre river or up in the mountains but all the bridges over the river were closed.  We do need the rain though, it might have just been more helpful to have it be more spread out. :)  It was great to see the community come together to help out.  The Red Cross shelter had too many volunteers at times.  Now the cleanup begins.

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