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Band Priority Dilemma


dnwk
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So, what's the recommended band priority? I figure out that with B41 as high priority, it is very difficult to keep my phone on LTE when I am driving around. You would easily be kicked back to 3G and it took a long time or a airplane mode recycle to get back on other band of LTE. I don't want to push B41 away as if I am not moving, that was a sweet band to park on.

What do you think?

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The band priority is just the order in which the phone initially scans for LTE. Once you connect to LTE, the network will determine what band to put you on, and it will move you to that band.

 

-Anthony

 

Well, when I am driving on high way, why they keep putting me on B41

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Well, when I am driving on high way, why they keep putting me on B41

 

What sort of device?  The Photon Q that you have listed on your profile is not capable of operation on LTE other than on Band 25 (1900 MHz PCS).  It isn't known for the best reception on 25 either.

 

Now, assuming you have replaced your device with a more modern telephone, it should always want to put you on 41 if your device is capable, as the capacity is the highest.  Once you get to the edge of range of 2500 (or the carrier becomes oversubscribed), you would likely be bumped to a band 25 (1900) carrier, which has approximately twice the range at a given transmission power and antenna angle.  After that, and assuming you haven't come into range of a stronger 1900 or 2500 signal, you would be moved to 800.

 

Remember that the system cannot place you onto a band beyond your device's reception range.  If you are on band 25, it can't just send you to band 41 unless your device communicated its ability to receive it and that its current reception is acceptable.  There is constant back and forth of control data between your device and the cell site, indicating the capabilities of your device, its current signal reception levels, and also instructing your device on which band it should park and operate - again within the bounds of its current reception and channel loading.

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So, what you say is Sprint network management system can send my phone to any band that my phone is able to receive. And dropping to 3G is likely because coverage hole?

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The scan time on the nexus is pretty lax as far as my experience. Airplane mode is my friend. About my only gripe w the phone.

 

It does have great reception as I am sure you know. My area has some sparse LTE on 1900 in areas, for example my s4 will drop before my Nexus, but will scan back for LTE quicker, where as the N5 holds on a bit longer and changes sites quite well staying on LTE.

 

In the spots it drops, I have to force a scan. I really only notice when I am tracking scpro or hunting though, which is daily. So I tend to notice it more.

 

Hope this sheds some light on it.

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I stream music on the road. So I hope less connection reset

A constant stream of data disrupts your devices ability to scan for additional LTE bands, and can cause you to drop to 3G because your device simply doesn't know what is available. For any device, streaming data makes changing bands and/or technologies more difficult.

 

Sent from my LG G3

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A constant stream of data disrupts your devices ability to scan for additional LTE bands, and can cause you to drop to 3G because your device simply doesn't know what is available. For any device, streaming data makes changing bands and/or technologies more difficult.

 

Sent from my LG G3

 

 

 

I stream music on the road. So I hope less connection reset

 

 

How do you stream your music?  Some app's that stream music will download data only periodically as needed so they are not actually always using your data connection.  

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That is because the 3G Air interfaces are generally not "forward compatible" with LTE, so any periodic better system scans have to be implemented at the handset, not forced by the network. If the handset is in an active connection on 3G, it cannot scan for 4G until it goes dormant for x seconds, usually 4, 7 or 10 sec.

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I did not realize constant data stream interferes with band selection on a tower.

It can, but not always.

 

The network can only push you to a different band if your device reports that it is picking up a different band.

 

If you move into an area that only has Band 25 and begin a data transfer, but then move into range of Band 26 or 41, you device will not be able to recognize that because it hasn't been able to scan for it. And if your device hasn't scanned for additional bands, it reports back to the network that it only sees Band 25, therefore the network can't move you around.

 

Sent from my LG G3

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That's a pity when I need to listen to live radio on my phone. But 3G in DC area improved dramatically. On 3G is no longer a problem for me to stream iheartradio.

Yeah, 1st world problems.

 

But seriously, I have the same issue when driving on interstate. LTE seems to be more prone to signal loss in hilly terrain than EVDO is (and I'm talking B26 here). If im streaming a live radio stream, I will drop to 3G and stay there until I stop the stream. It's really annoying when you are looking up destinations since a stream can continue without a problem at .10 mbps, but loading a map is impossible.

 

The only time ive seen my phone go from Band 26 to Band 41 while having a live stream is when I was driving away from a Sprint tower and coming up on a Clear only tower.

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It's true on AT&T too. Since they are actively deploying LTE in my area, I cannot stream music anymore. Because my phone will not ever switch to LTE while streaming. It will just stay on HSPA+. The same is true on VZW and Tmo.

 

When you are actively using 3G data, it will not move you up to LTE until there is a sufficient enough pause in active data usage. However, when in LTE, it will hand you down to 3G if you run out of LTE signal to handoff to.

 

Robert via Samsung Note 8.0 using Tapatalk Pro

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Is there a technical limit of going 3G to LTE that isn't there LTE to 3G? Or it is simply good network management or even device limitation? Hopefully once Sprint finishes up a couple more towers on I-95 through Baltimore, it won't matter anymore :-)

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