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LTE phones support Clear's LTE?


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Sprint should add the 2.5 Ghz LTE band in the 2013 LTE phones. There are no excuses especially since Clearwire plans to launch its TD-LTE service in mid 2013.

 

Will be interesting to see the handset the do it in as you can't add unlimited antennaes as there is a limit of space...

 

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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Will be interesting to see the handset the do it in as you can't add unlimited antennaes as there is a limit of space...

 

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk 2

 

They should be able to get it done. The iphone 5 can support 4 different bands of lte if am not mistaken, which I could be. I can only imagine having 800, 1900, 2500 lte.

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I would not be surprised if Wi-Fi (2.4 GHz) and LTE 2600 ultimately share an antenna. Since 2x2 MIMO is a given for LTE, that could also enable 2x2 MIMO for 802.11n Wi-Fi.

 

AJ

 

I've wondered about this possibility myself.

 

Robert

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I've wondered about this possibility myself.

 

Robert

 

It is just a simple matter of software radio tuning on the antenna. Such as some radio gear with a auto antenna tuner, raising and lowering capacitance on the tuning circuit with variable voltages. We hams do have access and experiment with frequencies of 2.4ghz and higher up to 300ghz.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

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It is just a simple matter of software radio tuning on the antenna. Such as some radio gear with a auto antenna tuner, raising and lowering capacitance on the tuning circuit with variable voltages. We hams do have access and experiment with frequencies of 2.4ghz and higher up to 300ghz.

 

No, probably not. I am guessing that ham radio is not all too concerned about antenna size, varied antenna gain at different frequencies, and power consumption. All of those are major concerns in mobile handsets, which most commonly use microstrip antennas (PIFA) and need to keep consistent antenna gain (within a few dBi) in each operating band.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microstrip_antenna

 

AJ

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No, probably not. I am guessing that ham radio is not all too concerned about antenna size, varied antenna gain at different frequencies, and power consumption. All of those are major concerns in mobile handsets, which most commonly use microstrip antennas (PIFA) and need to keep consistent antenna gain (within a few dBi) in each operating band.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microstrip_antenna

 

AJ

 

Hate to prove you wrong but you can't get a multi band transceiver to operate on 1 antenna size with out a matching antenna network.

 

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in this 1 part right here. " No, probably not. I am guessing that ham radio is not all too concerned about antenna size, varied antenna gain at different frequencies, and power consumption" in which we are vary concerned with that.

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in this 1 part right here. " No, probably not. I am guessing that ham radio is not all too concerned about antenna size, varied antenna gain at different frequencies, and power consumption" in which we are vary concerned with that.

 

Okay, sure, I am not very familiar with ham radio equipment. But I doubt that ham concerns about the above properties are as great as they are for handsets. The size of the equipment is just very different.

 

Just curious, do you have any idea what typical ERP/EIRP is for a mobile handset?

 

AJ

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y

Okay, sure, I am not very familiar with ham radio equipment. But I doubt that ham concerns about the above properties are as great as they are for handsets. The size of the equipment is just very different.

 

Just curious, do you have any idea what typical ERP/EIRP is for a mobile handset?

 

AJ

here is something to think about, what is a surefire way of turning your $2,000 and up radio equipment into a paper weight in need of repair? Antenna mismatch. Your typical Cell Phone power range is milliwatts. which hams use in qrp which is low power and radio experiments in the ghz range up to 300ghz.
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here is something to think about, what is a surefire way of turning your $2,000 and up radio equipment into a paper weight in need of repair? Antenna mismatch.

 

Okay, sure, I have no reason to doubt you, as ham radio is your area of expertise, not mine. But now the discussion is really veering off topic to ham radio, which you have not shown to have any particular relevance to mobile handsets.

 

AJ

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It is just a simple matter of software radio tuning on the antenna. Such as some radio gear with a auto antenna tuner, raising and lowering capacitance on the tuning circuit with variable voltages. We hams do have access and experiment with frequencies of 2.4ghz and higher up to 300ghz.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

Annnnnd another trip through the FCC for testing and approval... Till that happens nothing already released will be allowed to work on said freq...

 

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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Wait, are we saying that through a software update some phones could possibly access Clears LTE network?

 

No, definitely not. Software defined radio gives people the idea that anything can be fixed/changed through software, but it is not that simple. So, please, let us not get any members thinking again that RF capabilities can be added via software update. We went through that mess in the spring with some members insisting that WiMAX devices could be updated to LTE.

 

AJ

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No, definitely not. Software defined radio gives people the idea that anything can be fixed/changed through software, but it is not that simple. So, please, let us not get any members thinking again that RF capabilities can be added via software update. We went through that mess in the spring with some members insisting that WiMAX devices could be updated to LTE.

 

AJ

Lots (and I mean LOTS) of people insisted that the Motorola Photon could be upgraded to LTE with a simple patch, including plenty of Sprint S&R techs. It got bad enough one of the stickies on XDA included a giant, bold, red-font warning saying IT CANT BE UPGRADED TO LTE
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It is just a simple matter of software radio tuning on the antenna. Such as some radio gear with a auto antenna tuner' date=' raising and lowering capacitance on the tuning circuit with variable voltages. We hams do have access and experiment with frequencies of 2.4ghz and higher up to 300ghz.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2[/quote']

 

We also have 900 mhz band, but very low power. De n9ovr 73

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I'm pretty sure the game plan remains largely the same as Clearwire's standalone plan: use 2600 for offloading traffic in high density areas, and perhaps selling 2600-only LTE as a home broadband solution in those areas. The only main difference under Sprint control is that Sprint can now decide where to deploy 2600 based on its overall needs, rather than Clearwire deploying based on their independent goals.

 

The wildcard is whether NV's design carried through 2600 support as was originally planned. If it did, there will be a lot more 2600 deployed than if it requires new construction.

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