Jump to content

  •  





* * * * * 4 votes

Teaser: How does HTC M8 RF performance stack up?

Posted by WiWavelength, in Author: Andrew J. Shepherd 03 March 2014 · 15,164 views

Sprint HTC M8 FCC OET
Teaser: How does HTC M8 RF performance stack up? by Andrew J. Shepherd
Sprint 4G Rollout Updates

Monday, March 3, 2014 - 5:37 PM MST


No one is publicly sure what the codenamed HTC M8 will finally be called. HTC One 2, HTC One More, or maybe pull an Apple move and just call it yet again the HTC One. Regardless, all of the big four domestic variants were added to the FCC OET (Office of Engineering and Technology) database today. The last to have its authorizations appear online this afternoon was none other than NM80P6B700 -- the tri band LTE variant undeniably headed to Sprint.

As has been our trend over the past six months, we will still call this a teaser article -- albeit make it more extensive than usual. And we may not do a full RF breakdown in the future. Now that tri band LTE and 802.11ac, for example, are de facto standards among top of the line handsets, while SVDO and SVLTE have been laid to rest, there is less news to report on the RF side.

But we do want to run a brief RF ERP/EIRP numbers comparison among the high end HTC handsets that have graced the Sprint lineup over the past two years because, well, HTC has developed a bit of a reputation among S4GRU members for losing its lead in the RF performance department. Despite its moniker, the HTC EVO LTE was downright poor on LTE, and the follow up Sprint variant HTC One and HTC One max were average at best.

Numbers wise, the HTC M8 looks like a step in the right direction. Per the customary caveats, the available test bench measurements represent only maximum uplink ERP/EIRP, so they do not necessarily reflect the full two way RF performance equation. However, they can provide a decent advance peek inside at the RF proficiency of a handset.

In that regard, the HTC M8 offers some improvements over its predecessors. See the table snapshot below (or link to it on Google Docs):

Posted Image

https://docs.google....TFE&usp=sharing

More and more, OEMs are hiding behind the shroud of confidentiality and not allowing public inspection of the antenna diagrams in their FCC OET filings. HTC now appears to have jumped on that bandwagon. Fortunately, the Sprint variant HTC M8 docs do reveal some antenna gain figures, and those numbers are not always divulged, diagrams or not. Of note are unity 0 dBi or positive 1 dBi antenna gains for >1 GHz bands. Compare these to the -3.5 dBi antenna gain for PCS 1900 MHz in the HTC EVO LTE.

Additionally, though this is not apparent in the table because it lists only maximum figures, the ranges of max and min ERP/EIRP within the various frequencies in each CDMA2000 band class and within the various carrier bandwidths in each LTE band are more tightly clustered, more consistent than usual. This, likewise, could indicate enhanced antenna engineering.

And, finally, the single radio path handsets that have arrived in conjunction with Sprint tri band LTE so far have generally been better RF performers. Will the HTC M8 -- or whatever it gets called -- follow suit? Early returns indicate so, but once S4GRU membership gets its hands on a few samples, field testing in the coming weeks will tell the full story.

Source: FCC
Thread: http://s4gru.com/ind...m8new-flagship/




Well in the real world the One Max definitely out performs the One when it comes to lte connectivity so if this performs at least the same as the Max then I will be a happy camper.

Its good to hear that the HTC M8 is already done and HTC can boast the hell out of it on Mar 25th.  Hopefully it turns out to be a winner and wins some fans over back to HTC from Samsung.

This device is looking better and better.  Can't wait to see the battery size/optimizations they've implemented this year.

This device is looking better and better.  Can't wait to see the battery size/optimizations they've implemented this year.

I hope it comes with at least a 3000mah battery, that would make me very happy.

As an S2 and S4 owner, I have grown weary of Touchwiz and its laggy nature.  And also of plastic.  I would love to play with the 2014 One when it comes out.  I'm ready for a better built device and the S5 left me feeling fairly "meh."

I am hoping, a long shot hope... Hear me out. That HTC will make a model that performs like the N5 RF wise and is a Google Play addition with the ability to activate on Sprint. 

 

Tri-band

Great RF performance

GSM/CDMA capable

Google Edition

 

If it has those I will scoop ONE up so fast!

I am hoping, a long shot hope... Hear me out. That HTC will make a model that performs like the N5 RF wise and is a Google Play addition with the ability to activate on Sprint. 

 

Tri-band

Great RF performance

GSM/CDMA capable

Google Edition

 

If it has those I will scoop ONE up so fast!

I see what you did there!

How do these numbers compare to the LG G2 or the Nexus 5, which appear to be good "real world" RF performers?  I looked at the spreadsheet and was wondering if similar numbers for the N5/G2 are published on S4GRU (I looked but didn't find them if they are).

How do these numbers compare to the LG G2 or the Nexus 5, which appear to be good "real world" RF performers?  I looked at the spreadsheet and was wondering if similar numbers for the N5/G2 are published on S4GRU (I looked but didn't find them if they are).

 

  • In Band 25, this new HTC M8 looks like it may be slightly more powerful than the N5.  24.42 vs. 23.7
  • In Band 26, the N5 looks much better than the HTC M8.   18.59 vs. 23.2
  • In Band 41, the HTC M8 looks like it may be slightly better than the N5.  21.65 vs. 21.2

 

Of course, real world results may vary.  But the M8 looks promising.  Especially in Band 25.  I'm expecting it to be competitive with the N5, except in B26.  But B26 is less important since it has a propagation advantage.

 

Robert

Of course, real world results may vary.  But the M8 looks promising.  Especially in Band 25.  I'm expecting it to be competitive with the N5, except in B26.  But B26 is less important since it has a propagation advantage.

 

Yes, we must remember that, in free space, 800 MHz has about a 7 dB path loss advantage over 1900 MHz.  That means add 7 dB to the band 26 figure or subtract 7 dB from the band 25 figure -- but not both.  In doing so, band 26 pulls ahead of band 25.  And in the real world, the path loss disparity tends to be much greater, more on the order of 10-15 dB, in which case band 26 is way out in front.

 

AJ

Robert and AJ, thanks for chiming in.  Strange that the M8 appears to be a strong performer in two bands (25 and 41) and a little weak in the other (band 26).  I'll try to stop obsessing over numbers now.

Robert and AJ, thanks for chiming in.  Strange that the M8 appears to be a strong performer in two bands (25 and 41) and a little weak in the other (band 26).  I'll try to stop obsessing over numbers now.

 

Based on other Triband device numbers, the N5 is a B26 anomaly.  The M8 should be just fine in B26.  I have only heard a few B26 N5 reports so far, and nothing suggests that it is unusually strong as their FCC OET reports outline.  It could just be an insignificant outlier.

 

Robert

I think we are publicly sure what this will be called, HTC's own teaser videos call it the "HTC One" (prefaced by "all new" or "new" as they are comparing it to the current HTC One).  It makes sense, think of cars, they don't rename the the Mustang every generation.  It will make it tough to single out in web searches though when looking for accessories and such...  I can't believe people thought it would be called the HTC One 2, that's retarded.

Robert and AJ, thanks for chiming in.  Strange that the M8 appears to be a strong performer in two bands (25 and 41) and a little weak in the other (band 26).  I'll try to stop obsessing over numbers now.

 

If the Nexus 5 band 26 figures are for conducted power -- and I recall that they are, though I would have to double check -- then they cannot be readily compared to the radiated power figures for the HTC M8.  Conducted power does not take into account antenna gain.  And antenna gain for <1 GHz in these small handsets is almost always negative.  For example, the band 26 antenna gain in the HTC M8 is -2.5 dBi.

 

AJ

why is it always negavtive for spectrum below 1GHZ

Nice primer.  Very informative.  I can't wait to see what this device turns out to be!

 

So glad you included a brief RF ERP/EIRP numbers comparison. 

why is it always negavtive for spectrum below 1GHZ

Crappy housings. Get rid of the metal housings. Give us real antennas. I'd like to see 3 dB or more out of a phone.

Crappy housings. Get rid of the metal housings. Give us real antennas. I'd like to see 3 dB or more out of a phone.

 

Nope.  The metal housings are not the cause.  Otherwise, Samsung, with its chintzy plastics, would destroy HTC and Apple in RF.  That is not the case.

 

The gain issue for sub 1 GHz bands is wavelength versus antenna size.  Smartphones are not going to increase in size nor include extensible antennas.  Basically, nobody other than you wants that any longer -- pun intended.  The buying public has spoken.

 

So, you are better off expecting a return of CRT TVs or designing your own phone than wishing for smartphones to get larger or add whip antennas.

 

AJ

but but but how will compare to LGs next line up of devces, namely G3 and G PRO2??

 

I happy with the HTC One and the G2 I have. Both get great reception...

but but but how will compare to LGs next line up of devces, namely G3 and G PRO2??

 

Well, let Madam WiWavelength look into his crystal ball...

 

AJ

Great article. Why is it that HTC's RF has always sucked compare to other devices? I love HTC but when I'm out with friends Samsung is far better at holding a LTE signal.

Great article. Why is it that HTC's RF has always sucked compare to other devices? I love HTC but when I'm out with friends Samsung is far better at holding a LTE signal.

 

Careful.  You make a sweeping generalization and ask a loaded question.

 

In my article, I did not make any comparisons with other non HTC handsets.  We cannot speak to the real world RF performance of this HTC handset until it is in the hands of end users.

 

So, do not jump the gun.  And take that as neither an endorsement nor a caveat.

 

AJ

I have the M8 and like the LGG2 it won't pick up LTE like my Note3.

 

I remember reading an article about the LGG2 and the LTE bands being different.

 

Is this the same thing- I'm not a technical network GuRu but it would be nice to be back on the LTE train!!