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Is Sprint planning to deploy 60 GHz or 80 GHz microwave backhaul in Network Vision?


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Just curious if anyone knew if Sprint is planning to deploy microwave backhaul at 60 GHz or 80 GHz during Network Vision? I know that 60 GHz is unlicensed spectrum while 80 GHz is licensed spectrum so I would think that 80 GHz backhaul would be more costly. It appears that 80 GHz backhaul has a few benefits over 60 GHz backhaul in that it can travel farther and has higher overall throughput capacity.

 

Millimeter-wave (60 GHz) E-Band (80 GHz) Range 3 Km 5 Km Throughput 1 Gbps 10 Gbps Frequency 57-64 GHz 71-84 GHz Licensed No Yes

 

http://www.wimax.com/microwave-backhaul/backhaul-for-wimax-top-8-technical-considerations

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Just curious if anyone knew if Sprint is planning to deploy microwave backhaul at 60 GHz or 80 GHz during Network Vision? I know that 60 GHz is unlicensed spectrum while 80 GHz is licensed spectrum so I would think that 80 GHz backhaul would be more costly. It appears that 80 GHz backhaul has a few benefits over 60 GHz backhaul in that it can travel farther and has higher overall throughput capacity.

 

Millimeter-wave (60 GHz) E-Band (80 GHz) Range 3 Km 5 Km Throughput 1 Gbps 10 Gbps Frequency 57-64 GHz 71-84 GHz Licensed No Yes

 

http://www.wimax.com...-considerations

 

I have recently seen some of the Backhaul contract awards. To me it appears that the contracts for the backhaul put the entire burden on the vendor. They provide a complete package. Ethernet via AAV, Microwave, fiber...whatever. Then NV OEM's take the ethernet connection left for them at every site and connect it all up. How the vendor gets the ethernet to the site is largely up to them. I imagine each backhaul vendor will have their own microwave schemes and you will see tons of variability between vendors.

 

Robert

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Can those specific microwaves used for LTE? This article stated those microwaves used to support WiMax network

 

I am pretty sure that 60 GHz and 80 GHz microwave backhaul is applicable to both WiMax and LTE. Those 2 frequency ranges are common for microwave backhaul.

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And one frequency doesn't provide more bandwidth than the other. It all depends on the modulation scheme and channel width they can use. As you go higher in the spectrum you also have to worry about more rainfade.

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And one frequency doesn't provide more bandwidth than the other. It all depends on the modulation scheme and channel width they can use. As you go higher in the spectrum you also have to worry about more rainfade.

 

Yes indeed. And to compensate for rainfade, they have to make higher frequency links shorter and shorter distances.

 

Robert - Posted from my E4GT with ICS using Forum Runner

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I have recently seen some of the Backhaul contract awards. To me it appears that the contracts for the backhaul put the entire burden on the vendor. They provide a complete package. Ethernet via AAV, Microwave, fiber...whatever. Then NV OEM's take the ethernet connection left for them at every site and connect it all up. How the vendor gets the ethernet to the site is largely up to them. I imagine each backhaul vendor will have their own microwave schemes and you will see tons of variability between vendors.

 

Robert

 

The backhaul component is very interesting. Do you have any other examples, like you provided with the Chicago rollout (like boston :))

 

I've always been curious how the backhaul vendor effects the end-user's experience and how local backhaul actually ties into the sprint network.

 

I would love to hear any insight on how they choose backhaul, the performance difference between vendors (say AT&T vs. Level 3, Comcast, etc).

 

Lastly, how often does sprint actually have their own fiber reach a base station?

Edited by irev210
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I wonder why doesn't microwave their own fiber when they can? They do have fiber in a few U.S. cities but not the metro loops needed to bring them to the tower. So I wonder if they ever considered microwaving it from their IP Node to the tower.

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Lastly, how often does sprint actually have their own fiber reach a base station?

 

I'm assuming where ever Sprint can provide local loop access, they can do that.

Edited by Deval
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Instant oatmeal is a good way to microwave fiber.

 

AJ

 

If it can be done in a timely matter and within NV's budget, i'm all for it.

 

:rofl: That is so funny.

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I'm assuming where ever Sprint can provide local loop access, they can do that.

 

I am just curious how often that happens. I am also curious if a base station hooked directly into sprint's network performs better than one that is not.

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I am just curious how often that happens. I am also curious if a base station hooked directly into sprint's network performs better than one that is not.

Here's a pic of Sprint's fiber network in N. America.

oatmeal-and-craisins.jpg

Or maybe it's this,

North-America-GMPLS.png

can't really tell the difference.

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