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Marcelo posted this on LinkedIn yesterday:

 

Act Like an Entrepreneur to Accelerate in 2015
Jan 5, 2015

They said it would take months. I told my team to launch in four days.

Being agile and moving quickly have been keys to success throughout my career. This strategy worked when I was an entrepreneur creating startups and growing businesses. I’m relying on the same approach now as the leader of a company with 30,000 employees.

Waiting until something is perfect before launching or delaying a decision until you have 100 percent of the information are strategies for failure. By the time you act, the opportunity could be gone. Or more nimble competitors could move in and squeeze you out.

That’s why even as the new CEO at Sprint, I still think and act like an entrepreneur. Since beginning last year as the company’s top executive, I’ve been encouraging our employees to adopt a more entrepreneurial approach to their work. I’d encourage anybody else to do the same. Whether you are leading a company, managing a team or simply recharging your career in 2015, we all have a lot to gain by acting like entrepreneurs.

Here are some examples of what I mean. My company introduced leasing to the U.S. wireless industry last October. The Sprint team’s initial reaction was that we needed months to test it in the market and then make sure all of our systems were set up just right.

The wireless industry is hyper-competitive, and we didn’t have the time. I gave the team four days and said we’d figure it out as we went. We could offer consumers value by providing a new way for them to get the latest smartphones. We didn’t need to spend a lot of time and money researching a decision with an obvious benefit. It’s too soon to declare this initiative a definitive success, but the early signs are encouraging.

The fear of failure can be so great within large organizations that many people seem to look for reasons not to do something rather than embracing a great opportunity. That is why I believe we must take calculated risks. When you have at least 70 percent of what you need, go ahead and launch.

Something else that I expect from members of my team is that they know our business. It is critically important to do your homework ahead of time so that you are familiar with your company, your customers, your competitors and your industry. That’s the way to be ready when an opportunity emerges.

When those opportunities do arise, have the confidence to act. Set a goal and pursue it with everything you have. Don’t wait around for encouragement or support from others that may or may not come.

I’ve started businesses that grew to become regional leaders or even the top operations in their industry. I credit these principles for helping to drive the successes I’ve enjoyed and I’ve seen them work well for others I’ve observed.

The entrepreneurs and people in business I admire are those who have big ideas, are passionate about what they do and take bold actions to achieve their dreams. Everything we try won’t always result in a win. It’s only truly a failure, though, if we fail to learn from the experience and then improve.

That’s what an entrepreneur would do. That’s what I do. And that’s what I challenge you to do, too.

 

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Lets hope he does good first before getting ahead of ourselves....

For better or worse, he has his formula for success.

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For better or worse, he has his formula for success.

Yes I do agree with you on this, but we got to remember Hesse had a lot of success, it may of looked bad on him because of timing (He came in just after Nextel was bought, he tried Clearwire). I mean dont get me wrong some of his decisions wernt good (especially Clearwire) BUT in the END that gave us more spectrum just like Nextel did. It may of been a mess but look at where we are NOW, MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH better position to compete. (Sprint has the most spectrum). 

 

 

I think Claure is already doing a much better job and cleaning things up, I personally think CEOs should only stay for 5 years (at least for the wireless industry). Look at how Legree changed T-mobile, and now look at Sprint. This is just what I think I know people will disagree with me, or maybe some will agree!! :tu:

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Yes I do agree with you on this, but we got to remember Hesse had a lot of success, it may of looked bad on him because of timing (He came in just after Nextel was bought, he tried Clearwire). I mean dont get me wrong some of his decisions went good (especially Clearwire) BUT in the END that gave us more spectrum just like Nextel did. It may of been a mess but look at where we are NOW, MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH better position to compete. (Sprint has the most spectrum). 

 

 

I think Claure is already doing a much better job and cleaning things up, I personally think CEOs should only stay for 5 years (at least for the wireless industry). Look at how Legree changed T-mobile, and now look at Sprint. This is just what I think I know people will disagree with me. 

I think five years is reasonable in the wireless market. The tech and the market has changed so rapidly over the last ten years, that it makes it difficult to maintain a high level of success over an extended amount of time. I think Hesse was very good for Sprint, maybe even a savior. But his time had passed him by and it was time for a transformational leader versus a caretaker. I am still not convinced that Claure is that leader but the signs are promising.

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I think five years is reasonable in the wireless market. The tech and the market has changed so rapidly over the last ten years, that it makes it difficult to maintain a high level of success over an extended amount of time. I think Hesse was very good for Sprint, maybe even a savior. But his time had passed him by and it was time for a transformational leader versus a caretaker. I am still not convinced that Claure is that leader but the signs are promising.

I am glad you agree with me!! I think the only main reason AT&T and big reg Vzw has not budged is because there CEOs have been there for well over 5 years and I dont for see them changing anytime soon. AT&T I think is a little better then Vzw as in there seem to be noticing that being stubborn is not going to help them in the long run. One set of prices 2, 4, 5, 8,or even 10 years ago DO NOT reflect the ever so changing USA constant changes in prices of cost of living, minimum wage, etc. (thats not a good example but its what I could think of right now, lol).

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I am glad you agree with me!! I think the only main reason AT&T and big reg Vzw has not budged is because there CEOs have been there for well over 5 years and I dont for see them changing anytime soon. AT&T I think is a little better then Vzw as in there seem to be noticing that being stubborn is not going to help them in the long run. One set of prices 2, 4, 5, 8,or even 10 years ago DO NOT reflect the ever so changing USA constant changes in prices of cost of living, minimum wage, etc. (thats not a good example but its what I could think of right now, lol).

Big Blue and Red are also still living off of the benefits of not building their networks but buying them. Thats not to say that they have not made a lot of smart network moves, because they have. But in the end it was faster, easier and perhaps cheaper to buy the network.

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Big Blue and Red are also still living off of the benefits of not building their networks but buying them. Thats not to say that they have not made a lot of smart network moves, because they have. But in the end it was faster, easier and perhaps cheaper to buy the network.

I wish Sprint would buy the rest of U.S. Cellular, and especially nTelos, that would help Sprint out a lot with coverage where Sprint does not have current "native" coverage (well Sprint's own equipment). 

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I wish Sprint would buy the rest of U.S. Cellular, and especially nTelos, that would help Sprint out a lot with coverage where Sprint does not have current "native" coverage (well Sprint's own equipment). 

 

The CCA/RRPP should help with that, but implementation is going to take time. As much as it would be nice to buy USC, Sprint is so leveraged today they will need a few quarters of strong cashflow before being able to finance something like that. nTelos on the other hand...

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The CCA/RRPP should help with that, but implementation is going to take time. As much as it would be nice to buy USC, Sprint is so leveraged today they will need a few quarters of strong cashflow before being able to finance something like that. nTelos on the other hand...

I know I was just saying it would be nice lol

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The CCA/RRPP should help with that, but implementation is going to take time. As much as it would be nice to buy USC, Sprint is so leveraged today they will need a few quarters of strong cashflow before being able to finance something like that. nTelos on the other hand...

As much as Sprint may not be able to afford to buy US Cellular, they absolutely cannot allow somebody else to buy it. US Cellular represents the last chance that Sprint has to significantly grow through acquisition and absorb a tech compatible user base.

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As much as Sprint may not be able to afford to buy US Cellular, they absolutely cannot allow somebody else to buy it. US Cellular represents the last chance that Sprint has to significantly grow through acquisition and absorb a tech compatible user base.

I bet you if push came to shove Sprint could financially do it. 

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I bet you if push came to shove Sprint could financially do it. 

 

This. Fortunately (sort of) USCC doesn't seem interested in exiting the business.

 

Ntelos should be the first order of business. At the current share price nTelos could be bought for about $150 million. 

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This. Fortunately (sort of) USCC doesn't seem interested in exiting the business.

 

Ntelos should be the first order of business. At the current share price nTelos could be bought for about $150 million. 

I don't see why not, USCC sold there HOME market of all place (Chicago, IL) to Sprint. I see what your saying though and I think nTelos would be a better buy. 

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I bet you if push came to shove Sprint could financially do it. 

I agree as long as the price tag is not ridiculous.

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I don't see why not, USCC sold there HOME market of all place (Chicago, IL) to Sprint. I see what your saying though and I think nTelos would be a better buy. 

 

True, from my understanding between their spectrum holdings and customer base though selling off Chicago (and St Louis) made financial sense though.

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True, from my understanding between their spectrum holdings and customer base though selling off Chicago (and St Louis) made financial sense though.

I guess to me that sale just never made full sense to me, why they would sell there home market, might of well of just sold everything to Sprint, but that didnt happen obviously lol. 

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Yes I do agree with you on this, but we got to remember Hesse had a lot of success, it may of looked bad on him because of timing (He came in just after Nextel was bought, he tried Clearwire). I mean dont get me wrong some of his decisions wernt good (especially Clearwire) BUT in the END that gave us more spectrum just like Nextel did. It may of been a mess but look at where we are NOW, MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH better position to compete. (Sprint has the most spectrum).

 

 

I think Claure is already doing a much better job and cleaning things up, I personally think CEOs should only stay for 5 years (at least for the wireless industry). Look at how Legree changed T-mobile, and now look at Sprint. This is just what I think I know people will disagree with me, or maybe some will agree!! :tu:

 

Hesse did a good job, his thoughts were there just couldn't get it executed... There was another company he wanted to buy and was shot down... Amongst a few bad decisions he wasn't that bad... Just definitely not the put on your gloves and fight type ... But more like a good boy

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Hesse did a good job, his thoughts were there just couldn't get it executed... There was another company he wanted to buy and was shot down... Amongst a few bad decisions he wasn't that bad... Just definitely not the put on your gloves and fight type ... But more like a good boy

I know what your talking about the Sprint buying T-mobile thing. Thats something that boggles my mind about the wireless industry trying to consolidate, AT&T trying to buy T-moile would of been a messy thing but would of worked since they are both GSM.

 

Now the part that really makes no sense to me is the AT&T bought Cricket (CDMA), and the T-mobile bought Metro PCS (also CDMA) two different networks, different technologies that are NOT compatible. I get they wanted the spectrum but still just to me didnt make much sense, but I have my own opinions!! 

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I know what your talking about the Sprint buying T-mobile thing. Thats something that boggles my mind about the wireless industry trying to consolidate, AT&T trying to buy T-moile would of been a messy thing but would of worked since they are both GSM.

 

Now the part that really makes no sense to me is the AT&T bought Cricket (CDMA), and the T-mobile bought Metro PCS (also CDMA) two different networks, different technologies that are NOT compatible. I get they wanted the spectrum but still just to me didnt make much sense, but I have my own opinions!! 

 

Why doesn't it make sense?

 

1) Convert user base to parent's network overtime

2) Refarm spectrum and merge it into parent's network

3) Keep brand to target different demographic

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I guess to me that sale just never made full sense to me, why they would sell there home market, might of well of just sold everything to Sprint, but that didnt happen obviously lol. 

 

USCC had its headquarters in Chicago, but Chicago was never really a big market for them. They didn't have a very good spectrum position there. They lacked a cellular spectrum license that they have in most markets. The spectrum they held there was PCS only and was acquired as part of a divestment and they didn't have enough spectrum there to launch a 4G network.

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This is kind of off-topic, but the USCC sale in Chicago, as with most wireless M&A in the smartphone era, is all about the spectrum. Customers were not really included (they were named as part of the sale, but were released from their contracts and required to port out by the January 31, 2014 deadline or lose their numbers), nor were their towers (many of which USCC owns directly, rather than leasing them as is typical of the other carriers). Some USCC towers appear to now be in the process of being converted by Sprint in the other markets involved in the sale (central Illinois & MO), but around Chicagoland there are still quite a few old USCC towers standing empty, some of which would serve well as in-fill for Sprint.

 

USCC held only 10x10 MHz of PCS B block spectrum (just a disaggregation thereof, so not even the entire B block) in the Chicago MTA. In theory, they could have refarmed half of that to 5 MHz B2 FDD LTE, leaving room for 3 CDMA carriers (after accounting for guard bands; either two 1xRTT + one Ev-DO, or one 1xA + two Ev-DO, if they opted to make the migration to 1xA and/or VoLTE), which almost certainly would have been enough in the short-term given their good site density and meager ~5% market share.

 

The problem is, they would have sooner or later (likely within a few months) run into the same problem Sprint had. Once people would have realized that they finally had a 4G network and flocked back, the one LTE carrier (and probably also the 1-2 Ev-DO carriers) would have become oversubscribed. Sprint B25 quickly became horribly slow in many places (even after it went live on most sites), and didn't improve until B25-B (from USCC), B26, and Clearwire B41 began to be deployed. By the time more spectrum would have come to market and been deployed (600/700a/AWS-3), their churn would be through the roof, and their brand image here would be nearly as bad as Sprint's.

 

It would have taken a huge amount of money (CapEx, advertising/customer acquisition, and spectrum purchases) for them to again have been a viable competitor to the big 4, at a time when USCC was already hemorrhaging customers everywhere due to, among other things, billing issues with Amdocs, and badly needed the money for their remaining "core" markets. In the end, Sprint wanted the spectrum for their own needs, and made an offer the Carlson family couldn't refuse.

 

Ironically, they retained the naming rights to "the Cell." Hopefully after that deal expires, it'll go back to its proper name, Comiskey Park.

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