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Sprint, other competitive carriers rail against AT&T's special access rate increase


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October 23, 2013 | By Sean Buckley

 

AT&T's decision to raise special access rates is drawing fire from a group of wireless operators and CLECs that say the move is an abuse of its dominant position.

 

Competitive providers say that ILECs AT&T and Verizon collectively own about 80 percent of the special access market.  

 

Earlier this month, AT&T told its special access customers, which includes Sprint and tw telecom, in a letter that it would stop offering extended contracts and discounts for the special access lines they purchase to provide services to business customers and for wireless backhaul.

 

Read more: Sprint, other competitive carriers rail against AT&T's special access rate increase - FierceTelecom http://www.fiercetelecom.com/story/sprint-other-competitive-carriers-rail-against-atts-special-access-rate-inc/2013-10-23#ixzz2ie1lu06C 

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It'll be interesting to see how this plays out since ultimately any prices increases are eventually passed along to end users. (Bold emphasis mine) It's certainly an uphill battle when you're so beholden to two of your biggest competitors for such an integral part of your business.

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AT&T wants out of the TDM business because it's a crazy cost infrastructure to maintain.  Their TDM infrastructure is literal garbage. For a long time, AT&T had serious reliability issues due to TDM. When AT&T moved to IP backhaul, their reliability approved by leaps and bounds.  

 

What kills me here is why Sprint can't start slowly weaning themselves off most of the AT&T backhaul they use.  I know that can't happen overnight, but in 3-4 years I think they could be free of most of it.

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AT&T wants out of the TDM business because it's a crazy cost infrastructure to maintain.  Their TDM infrastructure is literal garbage. For a long time, AT&T had serious reliability issues due to TDM. When AT&T moved to IP backhaul, their reliability approved by leaps and bounds.  

 

What kills me here is why Sprint can't start slowly weaning themselves off most of the AT&T backhaul they use.  I know that can't happen overnight, but in 3-4 years I think they could be free of most of it.

What areas are known AT&T backhaul? I can't think of any off the top of my head.

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Sprint uses a lot of it here even though Cox is readily available and quicker to install. Must have been a higher price though.

Cox is readily available down there, huh?   ;)

 

I'm sure there is some factor that's making them use AT&T if Cox appears to be the better option.

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Cox is readily available down there, huh? ;)

 

I'm sure there is some factor that's making them use AT&T if Cox appears to be the better option.

Cox Communications that is ;) but... Errrr.. Nevermind

 

I already said the factor, cost.

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Who's going to provide backhaul for AT&T LTE sites then?

Either the fiber fairy or the backhaul goblin.

 

I don't know about rates, but in Florida, there is FPL fibernet, Comcast, Verizon, TWC, etc.

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AT&T provides a lot of backhaul to Sprint in Texas, the South, Florida and California. Think of the former SBC companies...BellSouth, Southwestern Bell (SBC) and Pacific Bell.

 

Robert via Samsung Note 8.0 using Tapatalk Pro

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