Jump to content

Clearwire Releases 2012 Annual Report


4GHoward

Recommended Posts

Well start looking a clearwire sites for new panels??

 

Most/all panels can be reused. I suspect that is how Clearwire is able to get so many sites live with TD-LTE so quickly and economically.

 

AJ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Most/all panels can be reused. I suspect that is how Clearwire is able to get so many sites live with TD-LTE so quickly and economically.

 

AJ

 

Maybe they need some LTE panels ;) another pet peeve of mine.

 

Sent from my little Note2

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember them saying they some sites could change to LTE with a software upgrade.

 

Sent from my little Note2

 

Some (all) of the Samsung basestations were dual Wimax/LTE. I don't think the Motorola ones could be repurposed.

Edited by bigsnake49
Link to comment
Share on other sites

With zero devices to use them :(

 

Fussy, fussy, fussy!!! I suppose you want to make phone calls from that device, too . . . :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Some (all) of the Samsung basestations were dual Wimax/LTE. I don't think the Motorola ones could be repurposed.

 

This is my understanding as well. The Samsung sites just need LTE carrier cards. The big thing for Clearwire is backhaul upgrades. Most of their sites could not offer anything remotely close to handling 60mbps speeds. This they are working on.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fussy, fussy, fussy!!! I suppose you want to make phone calls from that device, too . . . :P

 

Can he do "Fosse, Fosse, Fosse!" instead?

 

 

AJ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

This is my understanding as well. The Samsung sites just need LTE carrier cards. The big thing for Clearwire is backhaul upgrades. Most of their sites could not offer anything remotely close to handling 60mbps speeds. This they are working on.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

You can't tell me they were running on bundled T1 too?.... Would think any/all backhaul upgrades are easily done as I'd expect them all to be fiber/.microwave/AAV...so should be as a phone call to the vendor to up the pipe size no?...

 

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk 2

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would think any/all backhaul upgrades are easily done as I'd expect them all to be fiber/.microwave/AAV...so should be as a phone call to the vendor to up the pipe size no?...

 

My experience with Clearwire sites is that they rely heavily on microwave backhaul.

 

AJ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

My experience with Clearwire sites is that they rely heavily on microwave backhaul.

 

AJ

 

I can see that being the case.... In which back then when deployed they might actually need a different vendor if the tech was old enough and would be a bottle neck...no?

 

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk 2

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can see that being the case.... In which back then when deployed they might actually need a different vendor if the tech was old enough and would be a bottle neck...no?

 

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk 2

 

I think that DragonWave which is what Clearwire used for microwave backhaul is .8Gbps/1.6Gbps, so the backhaul tech is not the bottleneck. The bottleneck is the bandwidth purchased, not the tech.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The microwave itself is not likely the bottleneck. It's the connection on the other side where the microwave gets terrestrial. That being said, Clearwire has a hodge podge of backhaul with varying performance. Most of their WiMax backhaul as-is is not up to snuff for the LTE performance. But Clearwire has been working on backhaul all year.

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can someone remind me again who did Clearwire contract out to build out their Wimax base stations. From reading this thread it sounds like Samsung and Motorola did part of them and I thought I remember reading that Ericcson did some as well. I am glad to see that Samsung equipment is able to support WiMax and LTE just by adding new carrier cards. Companies like Samsung are always forward looking which is great unlike Motorola sites which always seem to be causing trouble. I am not surprised that Motorola had been struggling given the headache it gives to Sprint and Clearwire.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wait, if Clearwire is replacing WiMax base stations with LTE, doesn't that mean WiMax is going to be slowly disappearing? If so, I suppose it just kinda sucks to be a new Galaxy SII owner.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wait, if Clearwire is replacing WiMax base stations with LTE, doesn't that mean WiMax is going to be slowly disappearing? If so, I suppose it just kinda sucks to be a new Galaxy SII owner.

 

They are not replacing Wimax with LTE yet. They are deploying LTE in addition to WiMax.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can someone remind me again who did Clearwire contract out to build out their Wimax base stations. From reading this thread it sounds like Samsung and Motorola did part of them and I thought I remember reading that Ericcson did some as well. I am glad to see that Samsung equipment is able to support WiMax and LTE just by adding new carrier cards. Companies like Samsung are always forward looking which is great unlike Motorola sites which always seem to be causing trouble. I am not surprised that Motorola had been struggling given the headache it gives to Sprint and Clearwire.

 

Clearwire has been gradually releasing the names of its vendors of choice for its 4G build-out. Along with Motorola and Samsung, Huawei will be Clearwire’s primary RAN vendor and will also provide the base stations and other key infrastructure.

Clearwire had previously tapped Cisco Systems

to build its IP core, Amdocs for billing, mediation and customer management services and

Mformation for its device management platform supplier

. Ciena provides base station switching for Clearwire, and DragonWave and Motorola supply the network’s microwave backhaul transport.

 

http://connectedplanetonline.com/3g4g/news/clearwire-4g-wimax-huawei-0811/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They are not replacing Wimax with LTE yet. They are deploying LTE in addition to WiMax.

Oh, so using the same panels, keeping WiMax running? I suppose Clearwire just has enough spectrum to do that, huh? Does anyone (*cough* AJ *cough*) have a breakdown of what spectrum
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, so using the same panels, keeping WiMax running? I suppose Clearwire just has enough spectrum to do that, huh? Does anyone (*cough* AJ *cough*) have a breakdown of what spectrum

 

I don't know if they are using the same panels or not. If the channels they use are separated by enough MHz, they could. They could also add another panel in each sector just as long as it is separated by enough distance from the other panel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know if they are using the same panels or not. If the channels they use are separated by enough MHz, they could. They could also add another panel in each sector just as long as it is separated by enough distance from the other panel.

 

WiMAX carriers and TD-LTE carriers can be run from the same panels. They may need to be separated in frequency, however, because both are TDD airlinks. Unless their TDD rotations are perfectly synchronized, they do require some frequency separation because one TDD airlink may be transmitting on the downlink while the other is receiving on the uplink (and vice versa). If that were to happen and a WiMAX carrier were adjacent in frequency to a TD-LTE carrier, catastrophic interference would be the likely result.

 

AJ

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

WiMAX carriers and TD-LTE carriers can be run from the same panels. They may need to be separated in frequency, however, because both are TDD airlinks. Unless their TDD rotations are perfectly synchronized, they do require some frequency separation because one TDD airlink may be transmitting on the downlink while the other is receiving on the uplink (and vice versa). If that were to happen and a WiMAX carrier were adjacent in frequency to a TD-LTE carrier, catastrophic interference would be the likely result.

 

AJ

 

 

If I recall correctly, clear wire said they could do some things to save spectrum. I'll see if I can find the transcript from Dr Saw.

 

I think the expected waste from the overlay was rather insignificant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I recall correctly, clear wire said they could do some things to save spectrum. I'll see if I can find the transcript from Dr Saw.

 

I think the expected waste from the overlay was rather insignificant.

 

They just have to space the spectrum allocations for TDLTE and Wimax far enough apart not to interfere with each other. With some decent frequency planning you can even reuse that spectrum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I recall correctly, clear wire said they could do some things to save spectrum. I'll see if I can find the transcript from Dr Saw.

 

Really, that "old saw"?

 

;)

 

AJ

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • large.unreadcontent.png.6ef00db54e758d06

  • gallery_1_23_9202.png

  • Posts

    • It’s a neat and seemingly valid / effective strategy that, at least from my understanding, is only really used by VZW
    • Those are usually left over from the initial AWS deployment, so all run B13/B66 with support for BC0/BC1 (although that’s been shut off on most sites). No NR. Sites with the later Ericsson radios got an OTA update and broadcast B2. On those sites, a B5 OTA update was also available (and tested), but ultimately rolled back. Putting up all that power/spectrum severely degraded the B13 output.  The site atop Crystal Mountain is another story and uses the same setup as the site on the ridge near Neilton. These antennas were selected for their vertical beamwidth. Most modern directional antennas have small vertical beamwidths and would require extreme downtilt to cover the road next to a steep ridge. Thus, they would have a severely limited coverage footprint beyond the road. Omnis can be a better choice in these instances, especially when there’s LoS to the coverage objective (since they’ll generally have lower gain figures). Omnis also don’t run in to the horizontal sector edge problem, which can be difficult to optimize for with directional antennas that have complex or irregular 3D gain profiles. That’s why on a lot of sites on mountains, you’ll see wider antennas used. For example, the Verizon site on Joyce Ridge has three sectors with 80-degree HBW antennas. 
    • Do you know what RAN is behind those Omni's? LTE (bands?) are they pushing any NR through them? Very curious   edit: I guess I could check cellmapper etc but you might know more nuance!
    • N41 here has been expanded from 140Mhz to 180Mhz.  Speeds seem the same so they just need to work on backhaul
    • I noticed today that T-mobile has shut of B41 LTE in the Louisville area and widened the 2nd n41 carrier to 80MHz. That just leaves them with 5x5 B12, 10x10 B2, and two 10x10 B66 carriers on LTE, everything else is in NR (besides their 2G network). They have 20x20 n71, 20x20 n25, 5x5 n25, and 180MHz n41. 
  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...