Jump to content

Spint+Softbank+Clearwire is a big threat to other carriers according to this article


Recommended Posts

http://www.valuewalk.com/2012/12/sprint-clearwire-softbank-partnership-not-good-for-rivals/

 

just wanted to share.

 

"If the FCC accepts this transaction, Sprint Nextel Corporation (NYSE:S) will be the largest spectrum holder in the United States with an average of just over 200 MHz of the spectrum across the country. According to the National Broadband Plan, there is 547 MHz of spectrum useable for wireless broadband. Sprint, if the transaction is approved will possess more than a third of the available spectrum allocated by the U.S. government, but with less than one sixth of U.S. customers. That gives Sprint (on average 200 MHz and 56 million subscribers) the chance to use roughly 3.57 MHz of spectrum to support each of their subs. Compare that to a Verizon (on average 105 MHz and roughly 100 million subscribers) which has only 1.05 MHz of spectrum to upkeep each customer’s uses. More spectrums mean faster speeds, more capacity, and a stronger competitive position."

the most important phrase from the article

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I understand it the TDE 2600 mhz will be available to other carriers too. Clearwire always had planned to off service for high demand area via micro cells to who evete needs it and I think Sprint is ok with that too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, it is a threat. That is what competition is. It is a threat to the other carriers.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

Yep. I'm seing the articles about how Dish Network wants to halt the SB+Sprint deal, etc... There is money involved off course, but I woun't be surpriced if more companies try to jump in to disrupt the Softbank/Sprint deal from happening this year... :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sprint would let Clear sell to other carriers wouldn't they Robert?

Q

 

Probably not. Soft bank is here to compete directly with the big boys.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, this 200 megahertz number is a fallacy. There are very few markets that have more than 160. In fact there are very few markets that have 160. Most have around 100.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.valuewalk...ood-for-rivals/

 

That gives Sprint (on average 200 MHz and 56 million subscribers) the chance to use roughly 3.57 MHz of spectrum to support each of their subs. Compare that to a Verizon (on average 105 MHz and roughly 100 million subscribers) which has only 1.05 MHz of spectrum to upkeep each customer’s uses.

 

Okay, this is some seriously screwed up math. The analyst who wrote this article clearly does not understand bandwidth, let alone frequency reuse. All he did was use this equation: 200 ÷ 56 = 3.57. But that comes out to 3.57 Hz, not MHz, per sub. And it completely disregards the site density of the Sprint network. If Sprint had 56 million sectors, then every sub could effectively have the full 200 MHz.

 

AJ

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, this 200 megahertz number is a fallacy. There are very few markets that have more than 160. In fact there are very few markets that have 160. Most have around 100.

 

Robert, I take this figure to be a sum of Clearwire and Sprint spectrum holdings, so it also includes an average of about 50 MHz per market of combined PCS and SMR spectrum.

 

AJ

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also every company has a shot at those leases when they come up for renewal. Clearwire or Sprint may not even be able to renew the leases. Leased spectrum cannot be treated the same way as purchased spectrum. It is very different.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Robert, I take this figure to be a sum of Clearwire and Sprint spectrum holdings, so it also includes an average of about 50 MHz per market of combined PCS and SMR spectrum.

 

AJ

 

Gotcha. I am currently driving and I am only reading at stoplights. And I have not even read the article. So I'm pretty much blindly responding to just the Comments in the thread.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

That does not give you much reading time in your one stoplight town. Envisioning Robert repeatedly driving back and forth through town, reading only at the stoplight each time.

 

:P

 

AJ

 

I was on my way to Chama. I ran out of stoplights on the north side of Española. That's why it got suddenly quiet. ;)

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was on my way to Chama. I ran out of stoplights on the north side of Española. That's why it got suddenly quiet. ;)

 

If only you had taken US-285, the flashing yellow stoplight and left turn at Tres Piedras could have bought you a couple of seconds of reading time...

 

;)

 

AJ

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

If only you had taken US-285, the flashing yellow stoplight and left turn at Tres Piedras could have bought you a couple of seconds of reading time...

 

;)

 

AJ

 

Quite amazing that u know so much about this majestic state. Also, how do the big two or dish block SB and sprint purchase?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Keep in mind 160 MHz of this spectrum is Clearwire 2.5 GHz.

 

 

This spectrum has very poor building penetration and is largely undesirable, for anything other than adding dense short-range high-bandwidth backup.

 

Don't get me wrong, it's a huge advantage to Sprint, for now. But if the carriers REALLY need spectrum, the FCC will find some. There's already talk of combing the Military-held spectrum.

Edited by jnadke
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Keep in mind 160 MHz of this spectrum is Clearwire 2.5 GHz.

 

 

This spectrum has very poor building penetration and is largely undesirable, for anything other than adding dense short-range high-bandwidth backup.

 

Don't get me wrong, it's a huge advantage to Sprint, for now. But if the carriers REALLY need spectrum, the FCC will find some. There's already talk of combing the Military-held spectrum.

 

I great deal of that 160Mhz is leased from education institutions, not owned and it is not 160Mhz nationwide.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think that the FCC will even consider leased EBS spectrum against Clearwire ever. If you think about it, they do not own it. They may not even be able to keep it past the terms of the lease. And everybody has a chance to get it when it comes back up for renewal. And the lessor may not even allow it to be renewed.

 

How can you hold that spectrum against Sprint or Clearwire? You can't. It's not even theirs. They borrow it, with recurring costs for a limited time with no guarantee of it being there in the future. The FCC should only consider BRS spectrum assets that Clearwire owns when discussing spectrum assets.

 

And if the FCC disagrees about the value and usefulness of EBS spectrum, Clearwire should divest all of it. And see what happens to it. Nothing. The schools will just lose a revenue source and the spectrum will go back to being idle like before Clearwire started leasing it.

 

When it comes to leased spectrum, the lessor owns it. Not the lessee.

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • large.unreadcontent.png.6ef00db54e758d06

  • gallery_1_23_9202.png

  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...