Jump to content

Does Sprint have LTE repeaters in stores?


Recommended Posts

One of the things that's always bugged me as being borderline dishonest (maybe not even borderline) is to have repeaters in the store that present a completely false impression of what the network is like in a given area. I think all the carriers do it, but with the real state of Sprint's network in many places (like St. Louis), it bothers me in particular. I do realize that it's a somewhat higher concentration of handsets on the network in the store, and I also realize that even without repeaters the network can drop off from one point to another 100 feet away. But it still paints a false picture of the network to potential customers, especially in areas where nowhere within 10 miles of the store has a usable network.

 

Anyway, I'm going to be up in the Chicago burbs later this week (Wilmette, Glenview, and the area), and I was thinking I'd stop by a Sprint store to see what the LTE network is looking like so far. Does anyone know if Sprint's already putting LTE repeaters in the store yet though? Or will I actually be on the real network if I get LTE in the store?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is supposed to be only a small percentage of corporate stores with repeaters or LTE repeaters I read in a thread around here. The corporate store by me had an LTE repeater but they hadn't turned it on yet, I could tell, the phones had LTE coming and going constantly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Repeaters are usually only installed in stores that have weak RF signals. For example, my store has a repeater in the back because we are equidistant from 4 different towers and are in a zone where phones hop around all the time. The network 500 feet in any direction is usable and doesn't have this issue. But the particular location of the store, combined with the building's materials means a poor experience in the store compared to the surrounding area, obviously Sprint can't let that happen.

 

That being said, we have a single T1 coming into the store to provide backhaul to this repeater (from what I can tell based on the maze of wires for the server rack), and while that may have worked when most phones were 1xRTT only, it sure doesn't cut it now in the age of EvDO devices.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In Network Vision documents, only approximately 10%-25% of corporate stores will get LTE repeaters. It seems highly variable by market.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No repeaters around here. Sprint picks the worst locations for their stores, I always have bad signal at them.

 

Interestingly, Shentel does pretty much the opposite and places most of their stores directly next to a tower from what I've seen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No repeaters around here. Sprint picks the worst locations for their stores, I always have bad signal at them.

Well, they certainly did a good job here.

*opens back door*

*takes a photo*

25i9r2t.jpg

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Sprint store i go to in Fresno doesn't have a repeater, and you can tell with signals ranging from -85 to -90. The Visalia store is close to a site and does have a repeater, so its hit or miss in some areas.

 

Sent from my LG-LS840 Viper 4G LTE using Forum Runner

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think a repeater will work in a area without LTE to begin with. You must have some kind of LTE signal for a repeater to work, I think that is how it goes. I have a signal booster at my house and it was the best investment I ever made. All bars all the time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The local Sprint store I bought my iPhone5 in had a great signal in the store but it was not an LTE repeater. I've yet to see LTE anything in the Twin Cities with regards to Sprint.

 

We have our first LTE sites in Minnesota in the update this week. Stay tuned.

 

Robert via Nexus 7 on Tapatalk

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today was in my local Sprint store (ran by wireless lifestyle) and checked my LTE reception and was getting it like I was right next to a tower. Looked around and found the antenna pointed right into the sales floor area. Not great speed so might be using the backhaul from the store's connection. But there is real LTE in the area.

Screenshot_2012-11-26-13-05-45.pngScreenshot_2012-11-26-13-09-09.pngIMAG0344-1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • large.unreadcontent.png.6ef00db54e758d06

  • gallery_1_23_9202.png

  • Posts

    • That's actually really useful information when trying to locate/map these. On CellMapper, if I look for B46 it cuts through a lot of th noise.
    • Crunching the numbers a bit more, covering the full MSA would result in slightly under 80% population coverage. But they'd have to deploy on essentially every micro/macro cell in the area.   Yeah, I'm not gonna pretend like I know how either negotiations with squatters or Auction 108 will pan out. That said, I can't see 3.45GHz being *that* valuable to squatters considering the strict buildout requirements.  Another interesting thought I had was a possible spectrum trade with Dish. Dish is still leasing 600MHz to T-Mobile in quite a few metro areas, and I'm sure T-Mobile is looking ahead to what their lowband spectrum situation will be once those leases expire. If T-Mobile is truly going to rely on n71+n41 CA as much as they say they will, it sure would be nice to be working with more than 5MHz-10MHz of n71 uplink capacity. Don't go quoting me on that, though, total (pipedream) speculation haha.
    • Great job on your analysis of small cells versus the 3.45GHZ and the population coverage requirements. I wonder if the fcc is stalling because they may address the key limitation of of 2.5: the convoluted frequencies. Not sure how they would get there, but it would be better public policy if you could actually use a single license in current times, ie 5, 10 or 20MHz. Of course they could also go in more of a nonprofit or small business direction. But most likely they will keep it as planned given how messy the transition would be. In many/most metro areas BRS/EBS is fully licensed. Would be nice if they put pressure on the squatters.
    • I didn't actually look at the buildout requirements before making that comment - they're definitely going to have to deploy on macro sites if they want to hit the buildout requirements. PEA001 has a population of 25,237,061, of which they will have to hit 45% in 4 years (11,356,677) and 80% in 8 years (20,189,649). If they were to cover the entirely, all five boroughs, of NYC using only small cells (something I'd say is impossible considering their current small cell density), they'd only be covering 32% of the population in the PEA. And this is with spectrum that only adds 300Mb/s per sector and will likely have only 50% the range of their current n41 equipment. Doesn't really seem worth it to me. I'm of the opinion that they're looking to hedge their bets in further EBS/BRS acquisition. 
    • These strand mounts also are deployed with Band 46 (LAA), in my experience. I have yet to encounter a strand mount with exclusively 2/66. 
  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...