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Millimeter Frequencies Proposed for 5G


Guest 503ducati
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Guest 503ducati

Since this is over my head, anyone believe this could come to fruition?

 

 

 

http://www.dailywire...roposed-for-5g/

 

 

Researchers at Polytechnic Institute of New York University have assembled a consortium of government and business support to develop technology that could potentially increase cell phone capacity by more than 1,000 times. The 5G project hopes to develop the 80 GHz band using smaller, lighter antennas with directional beamforming to bounce signals off of buildings. The uncrowded millimeter-wave spectrum, has 50 to 100 times more user capacity is readily available. Smaller, smarter cells would cooperate rather than compete for spectrum.

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Guest 503ducati

More here: http://www.dailywire...over-100-miles/

 

 

DARPA has begun development of a wireless communications link that is capable of 100 gigabits per second over a range of 200 kilometers (124mi), reports Extreme Tech. Officially dubbed “100 Gb/s RF Backbone” (or 100G for short), the program will provide the US military with networks that are around 500 times faster than its current wireless links.

 

“A major challenge to providing 100 Gb/s from an airborne asset to the ground is cloud cover. Free-space optical links won’t propagate through the cloud layer, which means RF is the only option”, says Darpa

 

The Common Data Link (CDL) is a secure wireless protocol that networks together UAVs, aircraft carriers, helicopters, forward operating bases. How exactly, DARPA plans to squeeze out 100 Gbps on a 100 mile link (without lasers) is not clear. Currently the US military’s existing CDL links max out at around 250Mbps.

 

The EHF band at 60-80 GHz can routinely deliver more than 1 Gbps today. There is 12.9 gigahertz of spectrum allocated for commercial use in the 71-95 GHz bands.

 

Wireless gear capable of over 1 Gbps is available from Alcatel, Alvarion, Bridgewave, Ceragon, Cisco, DragonWave, Exalt, LightPointe, Gigabeam, Proxim’s GigaLink, Trango, and Ubiquiti AirFiber among others.

 

Presumably it will use the 70-80 GHz band, lots of MIMO and several Gigs of bandwidth.

 

The 802.11ad standard uses 60 GHz and has some 2 GHz of usable bandwidth. Mark Gradzinsky of Wilocity, a proponent of the 802.11ad standard, told me today that there was lots of room for speed improvements with MIMO and other techniques that could likely take it beyond 10 Gbps.

 

Using 16×16 MIMO-OFDM on a 20 MHz channel delivers 1 Gbps. If you multiply the bandwidth by 100 (2 GHz), you might get 100 Mbps on the 70 GHz band. Easy.

 

Presumably, if enough of these things can get built by the “deadline” next week, their inherent tractor beam could be utilized to steer any doomsday comet away from colliding with Earth.

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Guest 503ducati

The 80 GHz band can provide over 1 Gbps to each device. And when you hold an 80 GHz phone up to your mouth to make a phone call, it also offers a free dental X-ray.

 

AJ

So they're going to bundle?

 

 

:P

 

 

It will be interesting to see what type of applications they come up with.

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It would be OK for a downlink. Plenty of bandwidth. Uplink, not so much.

 

I'm interested in learning more about this.

What is the ideal amount of higher frequency for downlink to match uplink (or the relation ship of these two)?

 

What is the feasibility of AT&T using WCS for downlink and PCS for uplink?

 

Would this connection behave more like a purely WCS or PCS connection (propagation and speed wise)?

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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I'm interested in learning more about this.

What is the ideal amount of higher frequency for downlink to match uplink (or the relation ship of these two)?

 

What is the feasibility of AT&T using WCS for downlink and PCS for uplink?

 

Would this connection behave more like a purely WCS or PCS connection (propagation and speed wise)?

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

I would have to see statistics on what is the current demand for uplink vs downlink. With Carrier aggregation technology, they can use WCS for downlink. Of course they will have to get the approval of FCC with respect to interference with adjacent bands.

 

However I'm not sold on 80GHz as a point to multipoint tech yet. Point to point, yes. I would like to see the fruits of this research.

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