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Does the Evo LTE have 800 compatibility?


sparky222b
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I've seen conflicting information about this on Sprint's forums and elsewhere on the web so figured I'd ask if anyone knows anything definitive.

 

Does the LTEvo have 800MHz hardware compatibility on the radio for CDMA and/or LTE? Is this something we're likely to see enabled in the future with the LTE 800 buildout?

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The EVO 4G LTE operates on LTE 1900 and CDMA 800/850/1900

It will not be compatible with the 800MHz LTE network.

 

I believe they said 800 MHz LTE will be deployed in about two years. Probably just in time for people coming out of their contracts.

Edited by nocturnal
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There are no devices on the market that are compatible with the future LTE 800 network. And likely will not until next year.

 

The confusion lies in that the EVO LTE supports CDMA 800, which is voice and 1x Data.

 

Robert

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I don't recall exactly where I read it, but somewhere I saw that Qualcomm is working on a chip that will support basically all bands of LTE, instead of making a different one for each carrier and that it would be paired with the quad core S4 processor. I'm really hoping that lands in Nexus device by the end of this year. I would be ALL over it. Something like that is what I'm waiting for instead of going for a Galaxy S III.

 

Edit: Here we go, found it

 

http://www.androidpolice.com/2012/06/06/qualcomm-working-on-a-chip-that-would-support-multiple-multiple-lte-bands-carrier-networks/

 

Looks like it will support the 2500/2600 mhz bands too so it sounds like that will support clearwire's upcoming LTE as well.

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The chip is only one piece of the puzzle. You need the transceiver and antenna to go with that band.

 

Sent from my C64 w/Epyx FastLoad cartridge

 

Yeah, good luck packing all that in the space limited iPhone...

 

Sent from my Nexus 7 (nakasi) using Forum Runner

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The chip is only one piece of the puzzle. You need the transceiver and antenna to go with that band.

 

Sent from my C64 w/Epyx FastLoad cartridge

That would be up to the manufacturer to sort that out for each phone though. Making a single chip would be easier for Qualcomm instead of tailoring one chip to a certain phone.

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Yeah' date=' good luck packing all that in the space limited iPhone...

 

Sent from my Nexus 7 (nakasi) using Forum Runner[/quote']

 

Why would anyone want to limit the iPhone??? ;)

 

Robert via CM9 Kindle Fire using Forum Runner

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That would be up to the manufacturer to sort that out for each phone though. Making a single chip would be easier for Qualcomm instead of tailoring one chip to a certain phone.

 

Yes, a single chip is part of the solution. However, with LTE they use MIMO. At least 2x1 MIMO. Two receive and and one transmit antenna. And some LTE bands can double antennas, some cannot.

 

So, in a device, like the EVO LTE that only has LTE on one band, it needs three LTE antennas. If you try to cram more LTE bands, you may need six or nine LTE antennas. That's a lot of real estate for antennas in a little smartphone.

 

So regardless of how many LTE bands the chip set can support, the biggest factor in determining how many LTE bands a device can support now, is how many antennas will be needed for the bands that carrier needs and whether the device can support that many.

 

Don't get me wrong. Your point is good news.

 

Robert via CM9 Kindle Fire using Forum Runner

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If you try to cram more LTE bands' date=' you may need six or nine LTE antennas. That's a lot of real estate for antennas in a little smartphone.

[/quote']

 

Maybe they should license the patent from cheese-its. They have the commercials where they show how they pack an entire wheel of cheese in one cracker. That tech might allow 15 antennas in a smartphone...

 

From JBtoro on Forum Runner

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The confusion lies in that the EVO LTE supports CDMA 800, which is voice and 1x Data.

Robert

 

Makes sense. Voice on 800 is planned to be 1x Advanced / HD Voice, yes?

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Yeah, good luck packing all that in the space limited iPhone...

 

Sent from my Nexus 7 (nakasi) using Forum Runner

 

Are you kidding? By the time this chipset and associated components are ready, Apple will own Samsung & HTC thanks to all the lawsuits and will be demanding their OWN network and private frequency bandwidth for the iphone.

 

Tongue firmly planted in cheek, but then again there is this: http://patft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=7,966,578.PN.&OS=PN/7,966,578&RS=PN/7,966,578

 

Apple has apparently convinced the patent office that they created the touchscreen for mobile devices. Ok, maybe off topic a bit but had to do it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yes, a single chip is part of the solution. However, with LTE they use MIMO. At least 2x1 MIMO. Two receive and and one transmit antenna. And some LTE bands can double antennas, some cannot.

 

So, in a device, like the EVO LTE that only has LTE on one band, it needs three LTE antennas. If you try to cram more LTE bands, you may need six or nine LTE antennas. That's a lot of real estate for antennas in a little smartphone.

 

So regardless of how many LTE bands the chip set can support, the biggest factor in determining how many LTE bands a device can support now, is how many antennas will be needed for the bands that carrier needs and whether the device can support that many.

 

Don't get me wrong. Your point is good news.

 

Robert via CM9 Kindle Fire using Forum Runner

 

Does this mean we won't see any increase in voice/3G range and indoor signal as Network vision rolls out?

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Does this mean we won't see any increase in voice/3G range and indoor signal as Network vision rolls out?

 

Completely unrelated to the post you quoted. However, there will be a marginal increase in voice/3G range with initial Network Vision deployment. And then there will be pretty strong range improvements in voice and 1x data with the 800MHz deployment, which happens between 6 months and 1 year later in most markets.

 

LTE on 800 will improve LTE range even further when it starts being deployed in Late 2013.

 

Robert

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Completely unrelated to the post you quoted. However, there will be a marginal increase in voice/3G range with initial Network Vision deployment. And then there will be pretty strong range improvements in voice and 1x data with the 800MHz deployment, which happens between 6 months and 1 year later in most markets.

 

LTE on 800 will improve LTE range even further when it starts being deployed in Late 2013.

 

Robert

 

My mistake, I meant to quote the post which you stated

 

"There are no devices on the market that are compatible with the future LTE 800 network. And likely will not until next year.

 

The confusion lies in that the EVO LTE supports CDMA 800, which is voice and 1x Data.

 

Robert "

 

So 3g is not included in the CDMA 800 spectrum.

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My mistake, I meant to quote the post which you stated

 

"There are no devices on the market that are compatible with the future LTE 800 network. And likely will not until next year.

 

The confusion lies in that the EVO LTE supports CDMA 800, which is voice and 1x Data.

 

Robert "

 

So 3g is not included in the CDMA 800 spectrum.

 

Sprint is not deploying 3G EVDO in 800 spectrum. That is correct. They only have enough for one 1xA carrier and one LTE carrier.

 

Robert

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Yeah, good luck packing all that in the space limited iPhone...

 

Sent from my Nexus 7 (nakasi) using Forum Runner

That would be up to the manufacturer to sort that out for each phone though. Making a single chip would be easier for Qualcomm instead of tailoring one chip to a certain phone.

Yes, a single chip is part of the solution. However, with LTE they use MIMO. At least 2x1 MIMO. Two receive and and one transmit antenna. And some LTE bands can double antennas, some cannot.

 

So, in a device, like the EVO LTE that only has LTE on one band, it needs three LTE antennas. If you try to cram more LTE bands, you may need six or nine LTE antennas. That's a lot of real estate for antennas in a little smartphone.

 

So regardless of how many LTE bands the chip set can support, the biggest factor in determining how many LTE bands a device can support now, is how many antennas will be needed for the bands that carrier needs and whether the device can support that many.

 

Don't get me wrong. Your point is good news.

 

Robert via CM9 Kindle Fire using Forum Runner

 

Awesome back to the old days when we had brick phones. I wonder what they will cost. lol ;)

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I would like to get an evo lte, but what I am holding out for is the next nexus (or iphone eek) with LTE 800/1900/2500 :ninja:

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