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mmWave advances


dkyeager
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Much like 2.5Ghz years ago, mmWave is often derided for its weak coverage.  Can't go through glass, only covers a block outside etc.  Personally I expect it to get much better over time.  This thread is based on that premise.

Some of the mmWave bands also have licensing buildout requirements, which should help push this trend.

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That is Fixed Wireless, which iirc they should be able to aim in some fashion/ stay locked in. Still impressive.

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3 hours ago, iansltx said:

Sounds like USCC is getting the better part of a mile out of mmW: https://twitter.com/KieranKentley/status/1604549717199040512?t=TqI6b3TGbnBxymguFwGTkw&s=19

The issue with mmWave has never really been about line-of-sight (LOS) distance. LOS performance should be pretty good to excellent (when it comes to bandwidth) as the amplifiers and antennas improve. This new distance is a sign that things are getting better on that front.

The real issue with mmWave is the fact that it is READILY attenuated by objects which have a negligible impact on other frequency bands (things like people's bodies, trees, etc.) For example, to get a decent mmWave signal for my phone, I have to remove the phone case. This is an example of things which can be engineered out. Future phones will be better at receiving signals so this won't be an issue. No matter the engineering, mmWave will not go "through" buildings or around corners because it is a physical limitation of the frequencies used. 

To be clear, this doesn't mean mmWave isn't useful, it is highly useful in the right scenarios. It just isn't useful in the same way that the mid-range bands are useful. I think Verizon has the right idea on how it will be used in the future. The better the amplifiers and antennas can target specific stationary objects, the better they can use it to eliminate "last mile" hard wired access to provide competition

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22 minutes ago, PedroDaGr8 said:

The issue with mmWave has never really been about line-of-sight (LOS) distance. LOS performance should be pretty good to excellent (when it comes to bandwidth) as the amplifiers and antennas improve. This new distance is a sign that things are getting better on that front.

The real issue with mmWave is the fact that it is READILY attenuated by objects which have a negligible impact on other frequency bands (things like people's bodies, trees, etc.) For example, to get a decent mmWave signal for my phone, I have to remove the phone case. This is an example of things which can be engineered out. Future phones will be better at receiving signals so this won't be an issue. No matter the engineering, mmWave will not go "through" buildings or around corners because it is a physical limitation of the frequencies used. 

To be clear, this doesn't mean mmWave isn't useful, it is highly useful in the right scenarios. It just isn't useful in the same way that the mid-range bands are useful. I think Verizon has the right idea on how it will be used in the future. The better the amplifiers and antennas can target specific stationary objects, the better they can use it to eliminate "last mile" hard wired access to provide competition

I think a massive MIMO solution may also play well with mmWave, ie get it on the rebound.  I do also see firms like T-Mobile using it around sites so the bulk of the 2.5Mhz spectrum is not siphoned off by close-in users.  I also see the build-out requirements on some mmWave ultimately pushing them to use it around busy freeway interchanges like they have done in Seattle. 

Of course physics being as they may, 12/13Mhz may be even better.

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19 minutes ago, dkyeager said:

I think a massive MIMO solution may also play well with mmWave, ie get it on the rebound.  I do also see firms like T-Mobile using it around sites so the bulk of the 2.5Mhz spectrum is not siphoned off by close-in users.  I also see the build-out requirements on some mmWave ultimately pushing them to use it around busy freeway interchanges like they have done in Seattle. 

Of course physics being as they may, 12/13Mhz may be even better.

mMIMO has already been implemented - mmWave antennas are currently pushing over 5x the number of AE as midband mMIMO equipment.

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Is it time for mmWave 2.0? — Pongratz

https://www.fiercewireless.com/tech/it-time-mmwave-20-pongratz

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...we believe there are reasons to revisit the long-term mmWave forecast both to fine-tune the FWA opportunity and to consider the MBB implications with higher EIRP systems deployed as macros. Of course we need more data points (and high-band spectrum in China) before getting too excited. Still, preliminary developments provide some hope the mmWave narrative has more room to evolve.

 

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