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LTE LAA Discussion


JThorson
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With T-Mobile and now Verizon making a big push for LTE LAA (license assisted access), I thought I'd start a thread for general discussion of it.

For those who are unaware, LTE LAA is the planned use of 5GHz spectrum to supplement downlink with licensed spectrum. Since there is a lot of unused 5GHz spectrum (500MHz+), it allows for many 20MHz wide carriers to aggregate with licensed downlink. This will never be done on a macro cell, and is designed for small cell deployment in dense areas where the capacity is needed.

What do you guys think about it? If T-Mobile deploys it as well and as fast as they say they will (they intend to start seeding devices this year), I don't think Sprint could be the speed king even with 2.5GHz small cell deployment. That makes me wonder if Sprint is going to utilize LAA in the future.

 

 

Merged two threads on same topic -- Tim

 

 

 

They are planning on using the 5Ghz that is used with Wifi. I don't know about that. It is an interesting idea.

 

http://www.cnet.com/news/ericsson-aims-to-triple-network-speeds-for-4g-phones/

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This is pretty cool, but I'm not totally sure where I stand on carriers, especially the big 4, using unlicensed spectrum. Technically it is allowed, but what happens if hypothetically all 4 are using multiple channels of 5Ghz in the same area? Would interference between carriers and consumer/business routers be an issue? I know 5Ghz unlicensed is a huge band, but like 900 and now 2.4 it will eventually become saturated.

 

Anyone else? Am I crazy for thinking this?

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This is pretty cool, but I'm not totally sure where I stand on carriers, especially the big 4, using unlicensed spectrum. Technically it is allowed, but what happens if hypothetically all 4 are using multiple channels of 5Ghz in the same area? Would interference between carriers and consumer/business routers be an issue? I know 5Ghz unlicensed is a huge band, but like 900 and now 2.4 it will eventually become saturated.

 

Anyone else? Am I crazy for thinking this?

 

Ericsson RBS6402 picocell solution will be able to consistently sweep the unlicensed spectrum within it's individual RF environment, and adjust the connectivity (attach) to a vacant 5GHz on the fly. This way each SmallCell radio within any given indoor environment could be attached to a completely different WiFi channel, while the IMS core takes care of the rest.

 

Obviously at some point all freq bands will get saturated, but right now 5GHz is still fairly vacant.
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Ericsson RBS6402 picocell solution will be able to consistently sweep the unlicensed spectrum within it's individual RF environment, and adjust the connectivity (attach) to a vacant 5GHz on the fly. This way each SmallCell radio within any given indoor environment could be attached to a completely different WiFi channel, while the IMS core takes care of the rest.

 

Obviously at some point all freq bands will get saturated, but right now 5GHz is still fairly vacant.

So it is actively trying to avoid occupied channels? Cool! I feel better about it now.
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  • 4 weeks later...

http://blogs.cisco.com/sp/cisco-wifi-wi-fi-service-provider-lte-u-by-any-other-name-is-licensed-assisted

 

This is a good, balanced account of the pros and cons of LTE-LAA. I support using this spectrum but I would hope the politeness work done in Europe would apply here.

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  • 2 weeks later...

With T-Mobile and now Verizon making a big push for LTE LAA (license assisted access), I thought I'd start a thread for general discussion of it.

For those who are unaware, LTE LAA is the planned use of 5GHz spectrum to supplement downlink with licensed spectrum. Since there is a lot of unused 5GHz spectrum (500MHz+), it allows for many 20MHz wide carriers to aggregate with licensed downlink. This will never be done on a macro cell, and is designed for small cell deployment in dense areas where the capacity is needed.

What do you guys think about it? If T-Mobile deploys it as well and as fast as they say they will (they intend to start seeding devices this year), I don't think Sprint could be the speed king even with 2.5GHz small cell deployment. That makes me wonder if Sprint is going to utilize LAA in the future.

Edited by lilotimz
Merged previous thread on the same topic
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Sprint is already at an advantage by having higher propagation spectrum than 5GHz. They also have tons of it. And when Sprint feels necessary, they can also dive into the LTE-LAA game and go even further. So no, I don't think Sprint has lost its advantage at all.

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Sprint is already at an advantage by having higher propagation spectrum than 5GHz. They also have tons of it. And when Sprint feels necessary, they can also dive into the LTE-LAA game and go even further. So no, I don't think Sprint has lost its advantage at all.

Plus 2.5 will be deployed on macro cell giving sprint the coverage advantage.

 

I imagine it'll be hard for mutiple carriers to all find enough physical room to place small cells in congested locations.

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That would give house sized coverage zones with that spectrum if it is anything like Wifi. If Verizon and Tmobile start this, what keeps a troll from using the same spectrum just to cause issues? it honestly is sort of a last ditch effert for them to try and maintain their "speed king" title

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Sprint is already at an advantage by having higher propagation spectrum than 5GHz. They also have tons of it. And when Sprint feels necessary, they can also dive into the LTE-LAA game and go even further. So no, I don't think Sprint has lost its advantage at all.

That would give house sized coverage zones with that spectrum if it is anything like Wifi. If Verizon and Tmobile start this, what keeps a troll from using the same spectrum just to cause issues? it honestly is sort of a last ditch effert for them to try and maintain their "speed king" title

It'll be much better range than WiFi because they'll be transmitting at higher power. With WiFi you have to rely on 5GHz for uplink, but with this solution the licensed spectrum is used for uplink.
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  • 2 weeks later...

It'll be much better range than WiFi because they'll be transmitting at higher power. With WiFi you have to rely on 5GHz for uplink, but with this solution the licensed spectrum is used for uplink.

So where can you theoretically use it? Stores, malls, sports stadiums, etc? Edited by Houston_Texas
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