Jump to content

AT&T to charge $10/month for LTE-equipped GM cars


JimBob
 Share

Recommended Posts

AT&T will allow customers with an LTE-capable vehicle from General Motors to add the car as another device to their Mobile Share Value shared data plan for $10 per month, the same price as a tablet.

 

OnStar subscribers will get access to the following plans:

 

$5 per month: 200 MB of data per month

$15 per month: 1 GB

$30 per month: 3 GB

$50 per month: 5 GB

The pricing for non-OnStar subscribers is the same except the 200 MB plan costs $10 per month and the 1 GB plan costs $20.

 

GM is also letting customers buy one-time data packages. OnStar subscribers can get 250 MB of data for one day for $5 or 10 GB over the course of 12 months for $150. Non-OnStar subscribers can get 250 MB of data for one day for $5 or 10 GB over the course of 12 months for $200.

 


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why does my car need LTE when my phone has it, and has Bluetooth integration. This is so weird lol

 

Sent from my iPhone 5s using Tapatalk

Ease of use is everything today.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why does my car need LTE when my phone has it, and has Bluetooth integration. This is so weird lol

 

 

Sent from my iPhone 5s using Tapatalk

What comes to mind for me is the ability to have your car be a hotspot for your kids WiFi devices on road trips. Add a couple gigs to keep them occupied for a long road trip, saves your phone battery and allows you to limit how much they get to use pretty efficiently(assuming you'll get notified or it'll shut off when you hit your cap).

 

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What comes to mind for me is the ability to have your car be a hotspot for your kids WiFi devices on road trips. Add a couple gigs to keep them occupied for a long road trip...

 

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

I'm only 26 and I remember road trips filled with the license plate game, 20 questions, and padiddle. I can't believe how tech hungry "kids these days" are.

 

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm only 26 and I remember road trips filled with the license plate game, 20 questions, and padiddle. I can't believe how tech hungry "kids these days" are.

 

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk

I'm almost 20 and that's how it always has been me also. However the vast majority of parents these days are giving kids smart phones earlier and earlier, and using technology to parent their kids for them.

 

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

People are too addicted with technology. When I go on trips I always put my phone down and enjoy talking to the people next to me. The only time I use my phone is when I want to show them a funny video or reply someone back that's urgent.

 

Put the devices down. Talk to people around you, have a long conversation, plug in a music player, take road trip pics with a camera, print the pictures, make an album, etc. If you have a kid, give them a book to read or something.

 

It bugs me when I see people being on their phones instead of working. I talk to managers all the time about that. Instead of attending a customer they will be "secretly" on their phone. Or in an office job they will mess up a lot.

 

I don't have netflix installed on any of my phone. It's horrible watching anything on a smart phone. I'd rather wait and watch it on a big tv.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What comes to mind for me is the ability to have your car be a hotspot for your kids WiFi devices on road trips. Add a couple gigs to keep them occupied for a long road trip, saves your phone battery and allows you to limit how much they get to use pretty efficiently(assuming you'll get notified or it'll shut off when you hit your cap).

 

It's easy to leave the phone plugged in while driving, and a good habit to do so anyway during medium to long trips so one doesn't unexpectedly find themselves with a low battery.

 

I also never understood having to pay to add a data-only device to a data bucket, particularly if that device is not subsidized (which obviously a car is not). You've already paid separately for a set amount of usage on the network, so what does it matter how many devices that usage is spread across?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's easy to leave the phone plugged in while driving, and a good habit to do so anyway during medium to long trips so one doesn't unexpectedly find themselves with a low battery.

 

I also never understood having to pay to add a data-only device to a data bucket, particularly if that device is not subsidized (which obviously a car is not). You've already paid separately for a set amount of usage on the network, so what does it matter how many devices that usage is spread across?

Because hotspots are not included in your usage. Except on the huge data bucket family share plans for att and Verizon. For instance Sprint explicitly saying in their TOS that's its for your mobile device only(aka then one that's active on your line), hotspotting isn't included in that and if you want to hotspot you need to pay extra for a data bucket of hotspot data. If everyone was hotspotting for free even b41 would probably be crippled back to unsuable speeds. So many more people would be using their phone for home internet or internet on the go(instead of WiFi).

 

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Because hotspots are not included in your usage. Except on the huge data bucket family share plans for att and Verizon...

 

Sprint doesn't pool usage across lines, therefore they don't have "data buckets." Additionally, even if there was hypothetically a plan that offered shared unlimited data, I doubt it would be known as a "bucket", since it's not a fixed amount. The story is about adding a vehicle to an AT&T Mobile Share plan, so that (and VZW, since their plans are very similar) was the company I was referring to.

 

However, since you bring up tethering and hotspots, I would of course agree that an unlimited hotspot would be unsustainable, but if a customer has subscribed to a limited data plan of any sort (including the Framily 1 and 3GB options), they should be able to consume that allotment however they'd like, including tethering. Lines with unlimited can at least get as much tethering data as the next (limited) plan down. I think all of the other major carriers now do it this way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...