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Sprint one year from now...


JayLuvsCiara

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Where would like to see sprint one year from today?

 

 

With everything going on from NV, Clearwire acquisition, SoftBank vs Dish, LTE etc it just seems like sprints future is foggy.

 

I would like to see sprint taken over by SoftBank, have LTE nationwide, voice and lte on the 800mhz band, acquired Clearwire with lte on 2.5ghz band as well. Possibly have all smartphones (mainly flagships) have removable sims and participate in the wireless auction.

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I wouldn't say that Sprint's future is "foggy" by any means. From everything that I've been reading on here in regards to the DISH/SoftBank/Clearwire offers, I'd say that what they've executed thusfar with the deployment of the NV project they've gotten people's attention...and it's pretty clear that they've landed themselves on everyone's radar as the company to contend with. Hense, I'm extremely excited as to what their future will look like. :)

 

As far as what I'd like to see a year from now...? NV COMPLETION!!! Then they can focus on sub-1ghz LTE. ;)

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Mine is simple. Proper city spacing in the city and city coverage for the city geographic size of 2013 and not 1998.

 

Amen. I'm not sure 38,000 sites are going to be able to achieve that nationwide. Hopefully Phase 2 of Network Vision pours on the cell density big time.

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Amen. I'm not sure 38,000 sites are going to be able to achieve that nationwide. Hopefully Phase 2 of Network Vision pours on the cell density big time.

That's what I'm hoping for. First phase nearly done and they begin or already have started the 2nd phase.
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Phase 2 is 800/2500 lte not the great expansion or density increase.

 

Sent from phone

yesir, I know. That means a stronger signal in-building. My building's completely brick lol. SO yeah xD
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Phase 2 is 800/2500 lte not the great expansion or density increase.

 

Sent from phone

 

I'm glad you mentioned that, Iyad Tarazi pointed out that HetNets, which would provide a large density increase, would be a big part of Network Vision 2.0.

 

http://www.fiercebroadbandwireless.com/story/sprints-tarazi-explains-hetnets-and-network-vision-20/2012-10-03

 

FierceBroadbandWireless: You mentioned simplifying the core network. Is that just your Network Vision project or is it something else?

Tarazi: It is the next step in our Network Vision project. We internally refer to it as Network Vision 2.0. It is our HetNet strategy.

As you know, in Network Vision 1.0, we are deploying CDMA at 1.9 (GHz)--the G-Block--plus we're deploying next-generation CDMA,. We're integrating both CDMA and LTE together, and we're launching 800 (MHz) spectrum for CDMA.

Network Vision 2.0 will take the core and add some more capabilities to it and allow us to extend it to 800 (MHz) LTE. The work we announced with Clearwire (NASDAQ:CLWR) on 2.5 (GHz) TD-LTE, interoperability with all the small cells--picos, femtos and e-femtos--is in a seamless way. And all of the next-generation integration with Wi-Fi hotspots and the combination of all these tools now--CDMA, LTE at 1.9, LTE at 800, LTE at 2.5, picos, femtos and Wi-Fi--is also in a seamless manner The customers don't have to know they're moving back and forth, but they get the benefit of the scale that is in essence the next-generation core and radio technology we're deploying.

 

So 800 FD-LTE and 2.6 TD-LTE play a part, but to truly effectively deploy 2.6, you need to deploy some sort of HetNet strategy.

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Yeah, the value of such small sites would be extremely high in city centers. I should clarify, that my expectation is not to see a great increase in full build out sites till a 3.0 type tiimeline. Stretch it out and try to make some capital for a few years. Although in situations like New Orleans, or closer to my home, Madison, Wisconsin fixes need to happen.

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I'm glad you mentioned that, Iyad Tarazi pointed out that HetNets, which would provide a large density increase, would be a big part of Network Vision 2.0.

 

http://www.fiercebro...n-20/2012-10-03

 

 

 

So 800 FD-LTE and 2.6 TD-LTE play a part, but to truly effectively deploy 2.6, you need to deploy some sort of HetNet strategy.

 

By the way great find on the article so fast.

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I posted that article in October, to which Robert replied

 

"In docs we have seen, LTE 800 and LTE 2600 have always been referred to as LTE 2.0, with the timelines of starting in Mid 2013. I don't see anything in this article that makes me think there is any slip on Mid 2013 of LTE 800 or LTE 2600."

 

At that point I figured he was either Tarazi or Hesse.

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Other than the completion of NV phase one and the beginning of Phase 2 I would like to see:

1) No rate increase

2) Continuation of unlimited data

3) Additional add ons to increase the value of the plans

4) Cozying up with a Telco so that Sprint can guarantee a least one region that they will never have a problen upgrading the backhaul again! (Centurylink?)

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No increase requested. I am hoping for a density correction.

 

Sent from my little Note2

 

Agreed. With running LTE on PCS, their spacing isn't quite right. I am thinking they'll be in excellent shape once they deploy LTE on ESMR. Spacing will provide solid coverage everywhere under the existing sprint footprint.

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Agreed. With running LTE on PCS, their spacing isn't quite right. I am thinking they'll be in excellent shape once they deploy LTE on ESMR. Spacing will provide solid coverage everywhere under the existing sprint footprint.

 

EVDO wasn't spaced right here as we were pretty much built based on outdoor 1X coverage for handsets in 2000 with the pull out antennas. Many areas 800 1X/LTE will help but even that won't fix it.

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EVDO wasn't spaced right here as we were pretty much built based on outdoor 1X coverage for handsets in 2000 with the pull out antennas. Many areas 800 1X/LTE will help but even that won't fix it.

 

Same here. Verizon and MetroPCS have done it right in their PCS deployment in Florida. Even AT&T added 600 sites in Florida last year and that was one of their better covered areas.

Edited by bigsnake49
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Tower spacing in west michigan is terrible from iPCS, I think they did the bare minimum for PCS years ago. SMR is going to be great, hope to see additional tower deployments in the 2014 time frame.

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EVDO wasn't spaced right here as we were pretty much built based on outdoor 1X coverage for handsets in 2000 with the pull out antennas. Many areas 800 1X/LTE will help but even that won't fix it.

 

I can't imagine that an area built for PCS still won't have coverage under ESMR. There must be miles of holes?

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I can't imagine that an area built for PCS still won't have coverage under ESMR. There must be miles of holes?

 

You learn fast. Welcome to my market! It could be worse though and have coverage like TMobile.

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You learn fast. Welcome to my market! It could be worse though and have coverage like TMobile.

 

Yeah, that's a bummer. My dead zones are a few 100 feet or so.

 

I still suspect that ESMR should vastly improve your user experience.

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Yeah, that's a bummer. My dead zones are a few 100 feet or so.

 

I still suspect that ESMR should vastly improve your user experience.

 

Oh don't get me wrong, it will be an extreme game changer no doubt. I still believe we will struggle with the phone trying to hang on to and use the EVDO connection. But at least for me, it is very simple to force 1X only. I'm probably more excited about 800SMR 1X than the LTE rollout. It should allow me to get rid of my Airave as well.

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Tower spacing in west michigan is terrible from iPCS, I think they did the bare minimum for PCS years ago.

 

Yep, just the "bare minimum." iPCS flair density was decidedly lacking.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5YClmS3umk

 

AJ

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I know I will sound like a broken record, but I want the Softbank/Clearwire merger to close, the EBS spectrum and Clearwire network sold to Dish and Spirnt/Softbank to merge with TMobile/Metro. I'm not asking for much am I?

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