Jump to content

CES 2013 FiOS TV over LTE?


JustinRP37
 Share

Recommended Posts

I saw this from an article about Verizon FiOS at CES 2013 and wondered how they could ever broadcast live video over LTE when spectrum is hard to come by. I have FiOS service at home and have to say nothing beats fiber for home internet and tv. I just wish more companies would invest in infrastructure to provide for a more widespread fiber backbone.

 

Verizon everywhere

In his CES keynote, Verizon’s chairman and CEO Lowell McAdam indicated that FiOS TV won’t be limited to fixed line access in years to come. He said that Verizon may broadcast (multicast) live video over LTE in 2014. Mr. McAdam handed off a part of his presentation to a Ford Motor Company executive who described Ford’s Sync App link for smartphones – which indicated that

Verizon, and not just AT&T

, also has a focus on the connected car.

 

http://www.telecompetitor.com/ces-verizon-updates-fios-redbox-instant-to-meet-borderless-lifestyle-demands/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I think about the money we have spent bailing out companies since early 2008, we could have had a nationwide fiber network to every building in the country. Then the government can lease it out to any company, competitively, so any provider can offer service over it. I bet it could even pay for itself in a few years.

 

The internet should be treated like highways. And if there is a way to privatize access and make money, even better. So long as no one gets unfair access and dominate control.

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Verizon is starting that now, with the deal they have with Microsoft for the Xbox, and the iPad app, etc. I love how I can watch FiOS TV in my room on my Xbox, or on my iPad, as long as I'm home.

 

This is just the next step.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw this from an article about Verizon FiOS at CES 2013 and wondered how they could ever broadcast live video over LTE when spectrum is hard to come by.

 

The article is almost certainly referring to LTE EMBMS, which is a broadcast rather than unicast method. Basically, all users have access to the LTE RBs that carry the live stream(s). In that way, the same 2 Mbps live video stream is delivered to as many users in the cell as needed while still using only 2 Mbps of the total throughput.

 

AJ

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I think about the money we have spent bailing out companies since early 2008, we could have had a nationwide fiber network to every building in the country. Then the government can lease it out to any company, competitively, so any provider can offer service over it. I bet it could even pay for itself in a few years.

 

The internet should be treated like highways. And if there is a way to privatize access and make money, even better. So long as no one gets unfair access and dominate control.

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

 

You could not have put it better. The area I live in is served by FiOS and Cablevision. Why people still pay more to be with Cablevision is a question I cannot answer. I had cable my whole life, but once I moved to NY, I signed up for FiOS and it is by far the best, most reliable internet I have ever had. The speed and reliability puts my work's network to shame. The video is also superior to cable. A better fiber backbone can only help strengthen the economy. After all day traders in Europe paid big bucks to have faster transatlantic cables to decrease network latency across the pond to help with stock trading.

 

In that way, the same 2 Mbps live video stream is delivered to as many users in the cell as needed while still using only 2 Mbps of the total throughput.

 

That is pretty cool. Do you think that they could actually put out a decent channel lineup this way, or would it be more for the mobile TV watcher with only a few of the most watched channels? I could also see the big networks demanding much larger contracts per sub for this type of flexibility.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is pretty cool. Do you think that they could actually put out a decent channel lineup this way, or would it be more for the mobile TV watcher with only a few of the most watched channels? I could also see the big networks demanding much larger contracts per sub for this type of flexibility.

 

Possible but doubtful. Qualcomm's demo at CES was running four simultaneous H.264 streams, each at 1.9 Mbps and WVGA resolution. So, a decent channel lineup would quickly eat up much of the capacity of an LTE carrier downlink.

 

Rather, EMBMS is really designed for stadium, arena, and performance venue locations, where much of the audience would want to view the same one or two streams.

 

I would also like to see EMBMS used, if possible, to deliver cached but frequently updated web content. At an NFL game, a very large percentage of the data traffic is going to one of a few popular sports web sites (ESPN, Yahoo!, NFL.com, etc.). If the most popular pages on those sites could be cached and broadcast via EMBMS instead of delivered via unicast, it would free up quite a bit of LTE capacity.

 

AJ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You could not have put it better. The area I live in is served by FiOS and Cablevision. Why people still pay more to be with Cablevision is a question I cannot answer. I had cable my whole life, but once I moved to NY, I signed up for FiOS and it is by far the best, most reliable internet I have ever had. The speed and reliability puts my work's network to shame. The video is also superior to cable. A better fiber backbone can only help strengthen the economy. After all day traders in Europe paid big bucks to have faster transatlantic cables to decrease network latency across the pond to help with stock trading.

/snip/

Cablevision works quite well for me since I only have Optimum Online(Basic tier 15/2). Most of my TV is via Hulu/Netflix/Aereo, This only cost me $30 a month(for 6 months, in which I can just call the and renew the deal since I live in a FiOS area). FiOS internet stand-alone is almost $60.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Cablevision works quite well for me since I only have Optimum Online(Basic tier 15/2). Most of my TV is via Hulu/Netflix/Aereo, This only cost me $30 a month(for 6 months, in which I can just call the and renew the deal since I live in a FiOS area). FiOS internet stand-alone is almost $60.

 

I called Cablevision recently and threatened to switch to FiOS. As a result they are giving me all movie channels, Optimum Boost internet (30/5), and a multi room dvr for 140. Remember Optimum uses fiber too, they just don't run it into your home like Verizon does.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I called Cablevision recently and threatened to switch to FiOS. As a result they are giving me all movie channels, Optimum Boost internet (30/5), and a multi room dvr for 140. Remember Optimum uses fiber too, they just don't run it into your home like Verizon does.

 

That is true. The fiber runs to the headend. But, if your neighbors are data hogs, then you will experience a slow down. I love being able to negotiate though with both companies. You can definitely get better prices. Optimum is now giving those movie channels because FiOS has been doing that for a long time now. For $142 we have 50/25 internet, most movie channels, multi room dvr, and home phone (mainly for the telemarketers to call right at dinner or at the start of the Yankees or Rangers games grrr).

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...