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Modified Ericsson RRU's


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On April 2, the FCC's OET approved a modified Ericsson Radio Equipment application for CDMA & LTE simultaneous radio transmissions.

 

This Permissive Change request for this Radio Unit (RUS 01 B2) is to support new MSR combination with CDMA and LTE which is specified in Exhibit 12.

 

Source: FCC

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I bet the coveted RRUS12. Swap the RRUS11 on the 800SMR side and rock and roll. Bring the RRUs11 to another site that can use it.

 

EDIT: Nope. I don't see any 800SMR or even the G Block for that matter.

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I bet the coveted RRUS12. Swap the RRUS11 on the 800SMR side and rock and roll. Bring the RRUs11 to another site that can use it.

 

EDIT: Nope. I don't see any 800SMR or even the G Block for that matter.

 

They cover PCS G Block. They are rated for 1930MHz to 1990MHz, which is the G-block frequency range.

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They cover PCS G Block. They are rated for 1930MHz to 1990MHz, which is the G-block frequency range.

 

Maybe I misread that. It was in a quick glance. I wonder if there is another one for 800smr.

 

Sent from my little Note2

 

 

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Maybe I misread that. It was in a quick glance. I wonder if there is another one for 800smr.

 

Sent from my little Note2

 

I didn't see one. But I will keep looking.

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Maybe I misread that. It was in a quick glance. I wonder if there is another one for 800smr.

 

Sent from my little Note2

 

Here, check this out! RRUS 61 for TDD-LTE Band Class 41 by Ericsson AB. Approved March 14.

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While this sounds great, I wonder what Sprint is going to do if they win nationwide spectrum of the H block spectrum. Does this mean that all the OEMs will need to create new RRUs to account for the 1915-1920 and 1995-2000 MHz frequency ranges and Sprint would need to buy new RRUs to support it? I just don't understand why they OEMs don't just make RRUs that can operate in a wider range of frequencies. Its not like the wireless carriers are allowed to Tx in frequencies that they are not approved for anyways but the fact that if they end up purchasing the licenses to then Tx in those frequencies the wireless carriers wouldn't need to purchase new equipment.

 

For example, the RRU below is rated for 806-869 MHz. Even though Sprint can only broadcast from 817-824 and 862-869 MHz, it gives Sprint the opportunity for future expansion if for some reason down the road the 806-816 and 851-861 MHz becomes available for wireless services broadcast.

 

20120923_133426_zpsa60e2ce3.jpg

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Here, check this out! RRUS 61 for TDD-LTE Band Class 41 by Ericsson AB. Approved March 14.

 

Nice find. You and AJ are so good at probing the FCC database to look for things like this that are important for Network Vision.

 

My only beef about the RRU is why does the Tx operating range only from 2496 to 2658 MHz but Band 41 ranges from 2496 to 2690 MHz. Why didn't Ericcson test the RRU in the full Band 41 range? It doesn't make any sense to me. I guess it only sorta makes sense since 2496 to 2658 is range of 162 MHz and Clearwire has stated that they have around 160 MHz on average in the top markets. It could be a coincidence or intentional.

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Nice find. You and AJ are so good at probing the FCC database to look for things like this that are important for Network Vision.

 

This discovery was by accident, and I think I found something interesting. I will divulge more info later

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5 using Tapatalk 2

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Josh, your specs are wrong, or your assessment is in error. The traditional PCS A-F block downlink is 1930-1990 MHz. The PCS G block downlink is 1990-1995 MHz.

 

AJ

 

You are right. I did miss that. This is A-F block. It is certified for LTE/CDMA, that much I know for sure. I wonder who will use them then.

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5 using Tapatalk 2

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You are right. I did miss that. This is A-F block. It is certified for LTE/CDMA, that much I know for sure. I wonder who will use them then.

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5 using Tapatalk 2

 

So I'm not crazy then... Find the RRUS12 ;)

 

Sent from my little Note2

 

 

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...

For example, the RRU below is rated for 806-869 MHz. Even though Sprint can only broadcast from 817-824 and 862-869 MHz, it gives Sprint the opportunity for future expansion if for some reason down the road the 806-816 and 851-861 MHz becomes available for wireless services broadcast.

 

20120923_133426_zpsa60e2ce3.jpg

 

The above frequency coverage is LTE band class 27 which IIRC is the worldwide ESMR band, of which Sprint's band is a subset of so the inclusion of an "extended" frequency is meant more in order to apply to overseas iDEN to LTE conversions rather than to support some future speculative expansion of Sprint's frequencies (which won't happen anyway due to the public safety band in the US).

Edited by GoWireless
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While this sounds great, I wonder what Sprint is going to do if they win nationwide spectrum of the H block spectrum. Does this mean that all the OEMs will need to create new RRUs to account for the 1915-1920 and 1995-2000 MHz frequency ranges and Sprint would need to buy new RRUs to support it? I just don't understand why they OEMs don't just make RRUs that can operate in a wider range of frequencies.

 

Since we are talking about the FCC OET in this thread, an OEM and its testing lab would not be able to show that a transmitter operates within PCS/AWS-2 H block service rules because those rules have not yet been standardized. Hence, FCC OET authorization would not be possible.

 

The best that you can hope for would be that current panels, though not spec'd for it, can still support the modest 5 MHz FDD extension that is the H block and that current RRUs can be upgraded with new cards or even firmware, which would require then a Class II Permissive Change filing with the FCC OET.

 

AJ

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The best that you can hope for would be that current panels, though not spec'd for it, can still support the modest 5 MHz FDD extension that is the H block and that current RRUs can be upgraded with new cards or even firmware, which would require then a Class II Permissive Change filing with the FCC OET.

 

AJ

 

That would be nice if that's all they have to do to enable the H-Block.

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5 using Tapatalk 2

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Since we are talking about the FCC OET in this thread, an OEM and its testing lab would not be able to show that a transmitter operates within PCS/AWS-2 H block service rules because those rules have not yet been standardized. Hence, FCC OET authorization would not be possible.

 

The best that you can hope for would be that current panels, though not spec'd for it, can still support the modest 5 MHz FDD extension that is the H block and that current RRUs can be upgraded with new cards or even firmware, which would require then a Class II Permissive Change filing with the FCC OET.

 

AJ

 

Yeah this is what I was hoping for. A way to deploy the H block spectrum from the current RRUs and panels through upgraded firmware or new carrier cards without needing to replace the panels or RRUs up on the tower which will take a lot longer and add a ton of costs.

 

I know I am thinking ahead of myself since we don't know how aggressive Sprint will bid on the H block. I would have to think that given Verizon, ATT and Tmobile have been beefing up their spectrum holdings in the past year that Sprint would need to try to get the full 10 MHz in the H block in all the major markets and all of the < 20 MHz markets too and pay what it takes to get it.

 

I am not convinced that the 2.5 GHz acquired by Clearwire will help with relieving strain in the G block and enhancing capacity in metro areas nationwide if the plan isn't to expand into all major metro areas especially ones that were not covered by WiMAX.

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Yeah this is what I was hoping for. A way to deploy the H block spectrum from the current RRUs and panels through upgraded firmware or new carrier cards without needing to replace the panels or RRUs up on the tower which will take a lot longer and add a ton of costs.

 

I know I am thinking ahead of myself since we don't know how aggressive Sprint will bid on the H block. I would have to think that given Verizon, ATT and Tmobile have been beefing up their spectrum holdings in the past year that Sprint would need to try to get the full 10 MHz in the H block in all the major markets and all of the < 20 MHz markets too and pay what it takes to get it.

 

I am not convinced that the 2.5 GHz acquired by Clearwire will help with relieving strain in the G block and enhancing capacity in metro areas nationwide if the plan isn't to expand into all major metro areas especially ones that were not covered by WiMAX.

 

I was under the impression that the Clearwire spectrum would eventually be deployed throughout every major metro area.

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I bet the coveted RRUS12. Swap the RRUS11 on the 800SMR side and rock and roll. Bring the RRUs11 to another site that can use it.

 

EDIT: Nope. I don't see any 800SMR or even the G Block for that matter.

 

Here's the filing for the RRUS 11 that cover the G Block, and I'm still looking for the RRUS 12. Are they supposed to be CDMA band 10 for SMR voice?

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I don't see a link... there are several flavors of the RRUS11, the B25 is the PCS with G block. I can't remember the 800SMR one off hand. I spoke to a contractor once about the RRUS at a site and he showed me some mounting docs about the 11 and he said later they would come out with the 12 that did "4G and 3G at the same time". I've also heard the same from others.

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I found RRUS 11 for CDMA800 re-certified for 800LTE/800CDMA mix-carrier use!

 

https://apps.fcc.gov...TA8AKRC161287-2

and

https://apps.fcc.gov...TA8AKRC161287-1

 

Interesting! So they are calling them the B26A's. You never know they could be installing these right now as they look exactly the same as the B25. Definitely some weird combinations there... 1X and 3mhz LTE with diversity(1xA) on both. 2 1X carriers non-diversity, 1 5mhz LTE. I'm sure AJ can speak more on these and what they will probably run in 800SMR when iDen is dead.

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Interesting! So they are calling them the B26A's. You never know they could be installing these right now as they look exactly the same as the B25. Definitely some weird combinations there... 1X and 3mhz LTE with diversity(1xA) on both. 2 1X carriers non-diversity, 1 5mhz LTE. I'm sure AJ can speak more on these and what they will probably run in 800SMR when iDen is dead.

 

They were called B26A's from the original filings when they were CDMA only.

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5 using Tapatalk 2

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I was under the impression that the Clearwire spectrum would eventually be deployed throughout every major metro area.

 

Where did you read that? I haven't heard of any Sprint official or unofficial comments on where they want to take Clearwire for TD-LTE deployment. The only thing I heard about TD-LTE deployment was from Clearwire which involves deploying hotzones in 31 markets.

 

My hope is that Sprint would take TD-LTE deployment nationwide to all major markets in the urban areas. Since Clearwire only has ~16 K towers nationwide, the only way I can see Sprint trying to achieve this is through deploying TD-LTE on its own Network Vision towers where it already has the tower leases and backhaul set up in markets where Wimax is not currently covered.

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