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RAvirani

Sprint Backup Power

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Hey guys,

Yesterday there was a wind storm in Seattle which knocked out power to a lot of neighborhoods near me. Fast forward to today and I'm noticing Sprint service is completely down in several affected areas while Verizon and T-Mobile are fine (I don't have an AT&T device with me). Does Spint not usually equip their sites with backup batteries or some form of temporary alternative power?

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Hey guys,
Yesterday there was a wind storm in Seattle which knocked out power to a lot of neighborhoods near me. Fast forward to today and I'm noticing Sprint service is completely down in several affected areas while Verizon and T-Mobile are fine (I don't have an AT&T device with me). Does Spint not usually equip their sites with backup batteries or some form of temporary alternative power?
it depends. It obviously cost a lot of money to equip it with backup power.

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On 1/6/2019 at 2:47 PM, RAvirani said:

Hey guys,

Yesterday there was a wind storm in Seattle which knocked out power to a lot of neighborhoods near me. Fast forward to today and I'm noticing Sprint service is completely down in several affected areas while Verizon and T-Mobile are fine (I don't have an AT&T device with me). Does Spint not usually equip their sites with backup batteries or some form of temporary alternative power?

Network Vision sites (were initially planned) to have 36 Hour UPS Systems.  About 20-25% have backup generators.  Even though they are bid with 36 hour backups, it's not unusual for a 36 hour system not run 36 hours.  For instance, if they add more radios than originally designed, that will reduce how long the batteries will last.  Also, high demand can cause reduced duration too.  Also, UPS systems fail and batteries fail, etc.

Robert

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All Network Vision sites have 36 Hour UPS Systems, minimum.  About 20-25% have backup generators.  Even though they are bid with 36 hour backups, it's not unusual for a 36 hour system not run 36 hours.  For instance, if they add more radios than originally designed, that will reduce how long the batteries will last.  Also, high demand can cause reduced duration too.  Also, UPS systems fail and batteries fail, etc.
Robert
If I'm not mistaken some of them are powered by natural gas.

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4 hours ago, S4GRU said:

All Network Vision sites have 36 Hour UPS Systems, minimum.  About 20-25% have backup generators.  Even though they are bid with 36 hour backups, it's not unusual for a 36 hour system not run 36 hours.  For instance, if they add more radios than originally designed, that will reduce how long the batteries will last.  Also, high demand can cause reduced duration too.  Also, UPS systems fail and batteries fail, etc.

Robert

Interesting. Large portions of Sprint's network in Kent/Covington/Auburn were completely out today despite the fact power couldn't have been out for more than 12 hours. Maybe they had originally planned to only power a single 1900 MHz RRU?

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3 hours ago, RAvirani said:

Interesting. Large portions of Sprint's network in Kent/Covington/Auburn were completely out today despite the fact power couldn't have been out for more than 12 hours. Maybe they had originally planned to only power a single 1900 MHz RRU?

It's 4-8 batteries in the BBU.

4 if OG NV config with 1.9 + 800 and +4 with 2.5 deployed. 

IIRC it's mostly rated for 8 hours when I was looking at NV documents a while back. 

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My info was from the original Network Vision RFP's back in 2011.  I don't think I've ever heard/seen anything since then what they continued doing throughout deployment.  With that said though, it still stands that about a quarter of Sprint sites are on generator backup.  And they are determined based on communication priority.

Robert

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When the fiber feeds are knocked out from CenturyLink/Comcast, it doesn't matter anyway.

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