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mdob07

FW: US Carrier Traffic broken down by LTE Bands

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I came across this article on FierceWIreless and found it interesting. They analyze Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint's network traffic and find which LTE bands are carrying the load for each network.

The biggest surprise to me was how much of Verizon's traffic is on B4/B13. AT&T and Sprint are about what I'd expect from personal experience. Anybody else surprised by one of the carriers? 

https://www.fiercewireless.com/wireless/exclusive-spectrum-bands-carrying-most-data-broken-down-by-carrier

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1 hour ago, mdob07 said:

I came across this article on FierceWIreless and found it interesting. They analyze Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint's network traffic and find which LTE bands are carrying the load for each network.

The biggest surprise to me was how much of Verizon's traffic is on B4/B13. AT&T and Sprint are about what I'd expect from personal experience. Anybody else surprised by one of the carriers? 

https://www.fiercewireless.com/wireless/exclusive-spectrum-bands-carrying-most-data-broken-down-by-carrier

As I have experienced myself, mostly, although with Verizon I have noticed a lot more of B2 (1900) more than in the past for some reason. We should start seeing a good increase in B5 (850) with them shaving off towers next year that still have CDMA 2G/3G, since supposedly the end of 2019 is still what Verizon wants the CDMA to end. 

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The Verizon spread doesn't really surprise me.  700 is on every tower, and in rural areas especially you may frequently find 700-only.  My impression is that they have wideband AWS in more places than wideband PCS, and in my experience if only two bands are needed in an area, they choose AWS over PCS. 

- Trip

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You can see some of the LTE roaming areas with Sprint, although the T-Mobile roaming primarily occurred after their Aug 31 cutoff date.

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