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FCC rules on certain spectrum?


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I keep reading about Verizon's 700c spectrum (B13).  What exactly are the rules to this spectrum that Verizon won?  I know phones are supposed to come sim unlocked, but what else?

 

I've read something about them being unable to throttle as a rule for winning that spectrum too.  I was just curious because on an unlimited data Verizon business line, it's advertised as unlimited data but in the terms and conditions it says,

 

 

Fair Usage Clause  In the event that any subscriber averages more than one hundred (100) minutes of international voice minutes (resulting from calls that originate outside of the U.S.), or one hundred (100) megabytes of international data usage (resulting from data transmission that originate outside of the U.S.), over three (3) consecutive monthly billing cycles, such subscriber(s) shall be deemed to be have violated the Fair Usage provision of this Amendment, and Verizon Wireless shall provide written notice to customer with a list of such subscriber(s). Thereafter, Verizon Wireless and employer shall meet within thirty (30) days after receipt of such written notice by employer to discuss a resolution to mitigate excessive usage by the identified subscriber(s), which may include disconnection of service(s) for such subscriber(s), or adjustment of pricing for the plan affected by such excessive usage. Should 5 GB of data usage be reached in any given billing cycle, Verizon Wireless will limit the data throughput speeds for additional usage for the remainder of the then-current bill cycle.

 

Can somebody shed some light on this?

 

Also, if you have a question regarding other spectrum rules, please post here so we can keep a general spectrum rules discussion thread going.

 

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https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/47/27.16 contains the actual text of the law.

 

It basically says that Verizon has to not lock handsets, and provide whatever technical specifications/network information necessary for third-party device manufacturers to make devices (like the Nexus) that work on the Verizon's network as long as said devices don't create any detrimental interference. It also says that Verizon has to prove interference if they deny a third-party's request to allow a device to access the network, and then tell them what they need to know to remedy that. 

 

As bipbapbam said, they only throttled on their 3G network, but recently they announced that they will not throttle any users that are still on unlimited plans, which doesn't mean much considering there are so few people left on unlimited plans.

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Also, I truly hope that the 600mhz auction has open access rules attached to the same extent as the 700mhz C block did - I love the fact that Verizon has to sell their devices unlocked, although it will be less relevant with T-Mobile and other potential participants. 

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How did verizon get conned into letting people tether their phone with the data they bought without paying extra? 

Well actually, why should people pay extra for the data they already bought. Why should it matter whether you use it on the phone proper or as tethering?

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Well actually, why should people pay extra for the data they already bought. Why should it matter whether you use it on the phone proper or as tethering?

It's actually quite silly now.  With phone screens coming in 2K and 4K resolution, it can be just as demanding on the network now as tethering a tablet or laptop.  Before, phones used significantly less data, but I believe that trend is starting to change. (hence more carriers including tethering on unlimited data plans.)

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It's actually quite silly now. With phone screens coming in 2K and 4K resolution, it can be just as demanding on the network now as tethering a tablet or laptop. Before, phones used significantly less data, but I believe that trend is starting to change. (hence more carriers including tethering on unlimited data plans.)

I agree.

 

I'm curious what is going to occur with data prices next year, as 4k devices start becoming mainstream. Networks offering unlimited data definitely will take a hit, unless there is a reasonable network speed management system in place, or the Artimis pcell technology really begins to take off soon and quickly, as that is the best solution there seems to be, other than having the FCC gather the carriers to a conference and offer a radical spectrum solution similar to what I have in mind.

 

I've read online that a 4k movie stream requires a minimal 15mbps speed. I'm already thinking that if T-Mobile is indeed planning some sort of unlimited video program, they might be preparing to also institute an across the board 15mbps speed cap, in order to manage the network accommodating this future growth in data.

 

However, per gb data prices on bucket plans are a big question in my mind regarding this. I've also read online that an hour of a 4k movie stream is around 7gb. At Verizon's current bucket rates per gb equivalence of around $6 per gb, that is $42 per hour of 4k movie streaming. A two hour movie, $82, which is considering a large enough data bucket not to run into overages for that.

 

4k on mobile will not be commercially successful at those rates, for sure.

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