Jump to content

RootMetrics admits Sprint is making big gains


mhammett
 Share

Recommended Posts

https://plus.google.com/112870304502776282345/posts/YJexqWgontf

 

 

Verizon and AT&T still reign supreme in our comprehensive test of U.S. mobile networks, but T-Mobile and Sprint are starting to close the gap. 


T-Mobile has made no secret that its upgrades are focused on dense metro areas, and our data shows them making impressive strides there. Sprint has been nearly the opposite—it won or tied for first 15 times during our tests at the state level.
  • Like 15
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I still don't completely understand the results from the overall performance. If sprint scored higher in 27 states vs tmobile in only 20 states... With a tie of 3 between them... Why is sprint in 4th place.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone 5s using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I still don't completely understand the results from the overall performance. If sprint scored higher in 27 states vs tmobile in only 20 states... With a tie of 3 between them... Why is sprint in 4th place.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone 5s using Tapatalk

 

Without looking at their methodology, it's hard to say. I'd hazard a guess that it may have to do with population density covered?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I still don't completely understand the results from the overall performance. If sprint scored higher in 27 states vs tmobile in only 20 states... With a tie of 3 between them... Why is sprint in 4th place.

Sprint's high scores are, in most markets, not in data, but only in voice and/or text. And most of those high scores aren't actually wins, they are just "ties".

 

So, it's possible for Sprint to still come in 4th place nationally (since slow data is dragging them down significantly) but still tie for first on voice and text performance in many markets (which is a good thing, but doesn't actually push their ranking higher than any other carriers, since they are *all* getting high ranks on voice and text in most of those markets).

 

For example, there's a Sprint press release about "#1 RootMetrics score" in Oklahoma City. Sprint actually lost in OKC, by a large margin, to every other carrier. (It was a three-way tie between Verizon / AT&T / T-Mobile, and Sprint was roughly 6 points behind everyone else). It's genuinely a poor showing for Sprint.

 

However, in OKC every carrier had a good calling experience, so Sprint can say "Jointly awarded #1 voice network in OKC" and it's *technically* true, even while RootMetrics says "Sprint way behind in OKC in every metric except voice"

 

Repeat that for a bunch of markets, and that's where most of these Sprint PR's are coming from right now.

 

- - -

 

I think this is a bad move overall, because there are a few markets where Sprint is actually doing legitimately well in these RootMetrics reports after network upgrades. Knoxville, TN is a good example, tied for data with T-Mobile, and legitimately leading in call/text over Verizon. Beating Verizon on voice and text is a big deal, and a solid win. That's something to be proud about.

 

But those legitimately good markets will be lost in the spam of all these stretched "#1" PR's. I think some people will see that some of these PRs are misleading, and just assume they are all "lies".

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I personally think that root metrics is stretching the truth. When I did the comparison of overall performance which is at the top of each stage page when looking up the metrics by state, it concluded those numbers. Sprint had much higher points on average against T-Mobile for overall performance, and T-mobile was only a few points ahead in the states where it won. It just doesn't add up to me.

 

I can get the voice thing, but the root metrics report on their main page clearly says that sprint is in the bottom for overall performance....so it must not be a state by state comparison and rather a market by market or something (intentionally skewing the results?). It doesn't make sense, especially if the first thing they highlight on state reports is overall performance. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's a good move to start re-touting your voice and text again. Because there were a lot of people who had voice and text negatively affected by Network Vision. It's a way of saying that the period of dropped calls and delayed/repeating texts is over and we are back to normal or better with voice and text.

It's a good idea to keep news positive about Sprint making incremental improvements. Keep the stories coming steady and often. It will all help the brand image. Not hurt it. So long as it is true.

So what if someone says that data sucks in Orange County every time Sprint releases a PR about something good happening. Just keep pushing the good third party data every time it comes out.

Soon they are going to be able to start pushing some data achievements too. They just need to frame the data improvements as progress, and not make it sound like the conclusion.

Something like, 'Sprint moves up in RootMetrics data rankings in Chicago' with an explanation about what additional work is going on to improve things even further. Like additional Spark towers, etc. Because not everyone is going to be noticing those improvements and they need to be given hope it's still coming their way.

Robert via Samsung Note 8.0 using Tapatalk Pro

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's a good move to start re-touting your voice and text again. Because there were a lot of people who had voice and text negatively affected by Network Vision. It's a way of saying that the period of dropped calls and delayed/repeating texts is over and we are back to normal or better with voice and text.

 

It's a good idea to keep news positive about Sprint making incremental improvements. Keep the stories coming steady and often. It will all help the brand image. Not hurt it. So long as it is true.

 

So what if someone says that data sucks in Orange County every time Sprint releases a PR about something good happening. Just keep pushing the good third party data every time it comes out.

 

Soon they are going to be able to start pushing some data achievements too. They just need to frame the data improvements as progress, and not make it sound like the conclusion.

 

Something like, 'Sprint moves up in RootMetrics data rankings in Chicago' with an explanation about what additional work is going on to improve things even further. Like additional Spark towers, etc. Because not everyone is going to be noticing those improvements and they need to be given hope it's still coming their way.

 

Robert via Samsung Note 8.0 using Tapatalk Pro

Next, "Sprint passes At&T in netindex for Manhattan, NY". 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I personally think that root metrics is stretching the truth. When I did the comparison of overall performance which is at the top of each stage page when looking up the metrics by state, it concluded those numbers. Sprint had much higher points on average against T-Mobile for overall performance, and T-mobile was only a few points ahead in the states where it won. It just doesn't add up to me.

 

I can get the voice thing, but the root metrics report on their main page clearly says that sprint is in the bottom for overall performance....so it must not be a state by state comparison and rather a market by market or something (intentionally skewing the results?). It doesn't make sense, especially if the first thing they highlight on state reports is overall performance. 

 

Where are you pulling that info from?

 

T-Mobile hasn't won any state in any RootMetrics report. I don't think they ever have. (see http://www.rootmetrics.com/us/rsr/map/2014-1H )

 

T-Mobile has won or tied for first overall  in a small-ish number of cities. But never state averages.

 

T-Mobile has gotten first in data speeds in a larger number of cities. But usually, the reliability metric pulls them down a bit in the data performance average.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Where are you pulling that info from?

 

T-Mobile hasn't won any state in any RootMetrics report. I don't think they ever have.

 

T-Mobile has tied for first overall  in a small-ish number of cities. But never state averages.

 

T-Mobile has gotten first in data speeds in a larger number of cities. But usually, the reliability metric pulls them down a bit.

Not won. It was a comparison between T-Mobile and Sprint only. Verizon won most of the state reports, if not all, I believe. Verizon and at&t were not included in my comparison. The information is from the state reports on the root metric test. The first chart shown for overall performance.

 

I guess overall performance is not something worth touting? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not won. It was a comparison between T-Mobile and Sprint only. Verizon won most of the state reports, if not all, I believe. Verizon and at&t were not included in my comparison. The information is from the state reports on the root metric test. The first chart shown for overall performance.

 

I guess overall performance is not something worth touting? 

Oh, sorry. I must have misread / misunderstood what you were saying.

 

Overall performance is definitely worth touting. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, sorry. I must have misread / misunderstood what you were saying.

 

Overall performance is definitely worth touting. 

Nope, not your fault. I didn't write it out correctly the first time and can understand the confusion. If anything, Sprint should be touting this. T-Mobile is their main competitor right now and they're going back and forth like children. Sprint should use that information to their benefit and say:

 

"Sure...The T-Mobile Network is currently the "data strong" network built specifically for data, but ours is going to be that in no time, and is already significantly more reliable than yours. Root metrics proves it. Overall performance is a win in 27 states for Sprint!  #takethattmobile #whatsnext"

 

 

And then BGR will take that data, turn it complete upside down, rip out the innards and say that Sprint is still slow and not meeting promises. Blah blah

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • large.unreadcontent.png.6ef00db54e758d06

  • gallery_1_23_9202.png

  • Posts

    • Just figured out this is a waste of time. US Mobile and Verizon lock the eSim to the emei while T-Mobile only uses it to see that you have a capable phone, like Red Pocket does with physical sims (although RP does keep track of what phone you are using it on with the emei.)  So @Trip was right in this case on liking physical sims.
    • Verizon has a reputation for being frugal with MVNOs. After looking around, I also decided US Mobile was my best option. People have gotten C band on it.  Hoping for esim for my S21 Ultra.  No luck so far.  Red Pocket does not claim Verizon 5g, although they say Soon!(TM).  I do see some 5g with it. Typically MVNOs are deprioritized, thus I am reluctant to claim truly getting top speeds with one.
    • Did some exploring yesterday/last night and didn't find a shred of C-Band, including with my brand new US Mobile SIM. Did find 4CA CBRS but the site seemed backhaul constrained; both that plus 15x15 B2 and band-locked 2/66 got me 190 Mbps or so.
    • Did some more exploring yesterday/last night and I think I spotted some LAA downtown but didn't get a chance to confirm before it went away in favor of mmW, which also went away pretty quickly. Also saw another n66 site, as well as an n2 site, making AT&T the second carrier to run n2 DSS within a few miles of me. I think at this point they won't be able to advertise anything flashy, but due to the sheer amount of CA they're throwing at customers here they can keep their network at 50+ Mbps until they can deploy both 3.45 and 3.7, and that's probably enough.
  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...