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Wifi offloading - A new question


jefbal99
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There have many debates regarding wifi offloading and I know that this will eventually turn into that and be locked ;) But I had a thought recently as the tower closest to my house has new Panels and RRUs installed.

 

Should a consumer that only has High Speed Internet for their mobile device home use, keep that service once LTE is available at their home? Previous to my family cutting the cord and using streaming services for TV, my High Speed Internet was limited to my wife's laptop and our phones/tablets. I'm very sure that I could have convinced her that saving $70/month would have pushed her into full tablet usage.

 

How do the masses here feel about an end user canceling their HSI if they only use it for their mobile devices and do not violate the T&C of the Sprint contract?

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How do the masses here feel about an end user canceling their HSI if they only use it for their mobile devices and do not violate the T&C of the Sprint contract?

 

I would not want to be on the same sector with too many users like that. Heavy data use while truly mobile is one thing because it spreads the use across numerous sectors, thereby tends to average the loading. But heavy data use while always in a static location is another animal altogether. It causes an effectively permanent reduction in capacity for other users in that sector.

 

AJ

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I would not want to be on the same sector with too many users like that. Heavy data use while truly mobile is one thing because it spreads the use across numerous sectors, thereby tends to average the loading. But heavy data use while always in a static location is another animal altogether. It causes an effectively permanent reduction in capacity for other users in that sector.

 

AJ

How does Clear handle this with their home WiMax? Or is it a different beast being WiMax vs. LTE?

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While this goes against AJ here is my two cents:

 

You were sold a service and agreed to various terms and conditions.

 

If you are following those terms and conditions, what do you have to worry about?

 

It's on sprint to deliver the service you signed up for. You shouldn't have to worry about the "how".

 

It's not your job as a consumer to worry about how a company gets the job done.

 

At work, if you have a client and you promise them that you will deliver a project by Friday and you don't do that, is the client going to say "well I know you have a lot of clients so I understand..."

 

No, they will take their biz elsewhere. If you can't deliver on what you offer, you shouldn't be selling it.

 

Sprint is selling the heck out of unlimited.

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While this goes against AJ here is my two cents:

 

You were sold a service and agreed to various terms and conditions.

 

If you are following those terms and conditions, what do you have to worry about?

 

It's on sprint to deliver the service you signed up for. You shouldn't have to worry about the "how".

 

It's not your job as a consumer to worry about how a company gets the job done.

 

At work, if you have a client and you promise them that you will deliver a project by Friday and you don't do that, is the client going to say "well I know you have a lot of clients so I understand..."

 

No, they will take their biz elsewhere. If you can't deliver on what you offer, you shouldn't be selling it.

 

Sprint is selling the heck out of unlimited.

 

If you like unlimited and want to keep it as long as possible, then don't abuse it. And also tell others not to. If you want to consume more than your fair share of unlimited data now, and you don't care if unlimited goes away in the future...then go ahead and eat as much data as you can! Stuffa you face! Take another byte!

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

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I was just in the local sprint store here the other day. While waiting I got to hear the store manager tell a customer how she was going to get rid of her home ISP because of how fast LTE is. She was going to get a hotspot for her family at home to share. Then she proceeds to tell the customer not to actually use WiFi as it drains the battery more. And finally to top it off, her final answer to the customers couple of questions was "they are working on the towers".

 

<_<

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If you like unlimited and want to keep it as long as possible, then don't abuse it. And also tell others not to. If you want to consume more than your fair share of unlimited data now, and you don't care if unlimited goes away in the future...then go ahead and eat as much data as you can! Stuffa you face! Take another byte!

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

 

I know, I know, heh. I define abuse as breaking the T&C to use a service in a way that sprint did not intend. You and AJ define abuse a little differently (which is fine too, just a different viewpoint).

 

While I go against the grain on this one, I appreciate you guys letting me take a stand (and having a good discussion about it it).

 

I was just in the local sprint store here the other day. While waiting I got to hear the store manager tell a customer how she was going to get rid of her home ISP because of how fast LTE is. She was going to get a hotspot for her family at home to share. Then she proceeds to tell the customer not to actually use WiFi as it drains the battery more. And finally to top it off, her final answer to the customers couple of questions was "they are working on the towers".

 

<_<

 

I see this as a good thing. LTE hotspots are not unlimited - if sprint could sell LTE for home using hotspots, that's fantastic. More revenue. Verizon does the same thing - and probably makes a boatload of money doing it.

 

As for the WiFi comment, that's just dumb. Customers benefit from better battery life, faster data connectivity and access to their home network (automation, locally stored files, etc). With how good phones are automatically picking up and disconnecting to WiFi, there is no reason not to use it.

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I know, I know, heh. I define abuse as breaking the T&C to use a service in a way that sprint did not intend. You and AJ define abuse a little differently (which is fine too, just a different viewpoint).

 

While I go against the grain on this one, I appreciate you guys letting me take a stand (and having a good discussion about it it).

 

Thanks for giving me a reason to type, "stuffa you face!"

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

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Thanks for giving me a reason to type, "stuffa you face!"

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

 

They just need to update their lame "I am unlimited" commercial.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frKZyFYxQCY

 

"So why would you cap that? Take another byte"

"I need, no, I have the right to be unlimited stuffa my face!"

"I am unlimited stuffa my face!"

 

I think it would be better having cookie monster do that commercial. Take another byte! Visit more websites to get more cookies! I stuffa my face with cookies from websites!

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There have many debates regarding wifi offloading and I know that this will eventually turn into that and be locked ;) But I had a thought recently as the tower closest to my house has new Panels and RRUs installed.

 

Should a consumer that only has High Speed Internet for their mobile device home use, keep that service once LTE is available at their home? Previous to my family cutting the cord and using streaming services for TV, my High Speed Internet was limited to my wife's laptop and our phones/tablets. I'm very sure that I could have convinced her that saving $70/month would have pushed her into full tablet usage.

 

How do the masses here feel about an end user canceling their HSI if they only use it for their mobile devices and do not violate the T&C of the Sprint contract?

 

I could see this working if all you utilize your home internet service for is browsing. Anything more than that would just be a PITA in my opinion.

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I know, I know, heh. I define abuse as breaking the T&C to use a service in a way that sprint did not intend. You and AJ define abuse a little differently (which is fine too, just a different viewpoint).

 

While I go against the grain on this one, I appreciate you guys letting me take a stand (and having a good discussion about it it).

 

 

 

I see this as a good thing. LTE hotspots are not unlimited - if sprint could sell LTE for home using hotspots, that's fantastic. More revenue. Verizon does the same thing - and probably makes a boatload of money doing it.

 

As for the WiFi comment, that's just dumb. Customers benefit from better battery life, faster data connectivity and access to their home network (automation, locally stored files, etc). With how good phones are automatically picking up and disconnecting to WiFi, there is no reason not to use it.

 

 

 

Hot spots and tablets are unlimited for corporate employees. Each employee can have one phone for free, 1tablet for 20, 1 hot spot for 20 and 1 phone connect for 15. All of those are completely unlimited plans. Thats just what each employee is allowed in their personal account.

 

Sent from my LG-LS970 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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I would not want to be on the same sector with too many users like that. Heavy data use while truly mobile is one thing because it spreads the use across numerous sectors, thereby tends to average the loading. But heavy data use while always in a static location is another animal altogether. It causes an effectively permanent reduction in capacity for other users in that sector.

 

AJ

 

This is where I feel being both the wireline and wireless provider could really help.

 

If the telephone companies could make open universal LTE femto's to challenge WiFi, then this whole static load could be avoided entirely and provide a new avenue for data that is secure and almost universally available.

 

The disconnect is entirely mitigated.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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I'd contend that fixed usage is actually *easier* to deal with, because you can plan for capacity increases, rather than having someone spike in usage in one area, then go to another and spike again. On the one hand, you can add another 5x5 LTE carrier to a single sector, or add TD-LTE, or whatever. On the other, you add capacity willy-nilly and pray that it's enough.

 

Hence why DASes at airports and sports fields are a Very Good Thing ™, and why cell service was spotty at the F1 track a few months ago (where, aside from a couple events per year, the entire network sits dormant).

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