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jman02

LTE is finally here, now what? (LTE uses)

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'It may or may not be, just as tethering may or may not drive more data traffic. But in both cases, the potential for abuse is high. In this case, watching video on an HDTV tends to be more palatable than watching video on a 4.7 inch screen. So, people tend to do it more often and do it for longer periods.'

 

I disagree. Granted there is no clear line between data use and abuse, it is the same amount of data regardless of its on a 50" screen or a 4.7" screen.

 

'In any case, streaming video over the macro network from a handset to a TV almost certainly violates the Ts and Cs, since it is "an activity that connects any device to Personal Computers (including without limitation, laptops), or other equipment for the purpose of transmitting wireless data over the network."'

 

If it is a Ts and Cs violation, then Sprint should not allow Netflix on thier network.

 

'I am getting really sick and tired of many of you people. More and more, I am not sure why I should bother to provide my dozen years of wireless research experience to this forum to help you understand Network Vision. Sprint is doing a complete network renovation, but many of you yahoos are going to drag down Network Vision in just a few years with your "unlimited" data usage because you cannot exercise a small amount of self control and common courtesy to the subs around you.'

 

Other providers have enacted caps because of the growth of smartphones and their capabilities. Take ATT and the Iphone.

 

Maybe if iphone users didn't use their iphones for what they were made for then yeah ATT might no have enacted a cap.

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Having a small tethering data allotment of less than 1 GB per month would be an elegant solution for Sprint to include in plans. However, adding a hotspot as needed and taking it off when done is a very cheap option I employ every so often.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

If I could do this without a phone call and them just logging the usage as I use it. I would never use a 3rd party tethering. I tether maybe every couple months. Might use 10MB. Even less with the note now. But its still a pain to call Sprint to turn on and off, and for as little I use it, I don't feel bad about using an app. But, for the others who go nuts, damn them.

 

 

Sent from my Note 2 using Tapatalk

 

 

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It may or may not be, just as tethering may or may not drive more data traffic. But in both cases, the potential for abuse is high. In this case, watching video on an HDTV tends to be more palatable than watching video on a 4.7 inch screen. So, people tend to do it more often and do it for longer periods.

 

In any case, streaming video over the macro network from a handset to a TV almost certainly violates the Ts and Cs, since it is "an activity that connects any device to Personal Computers (including without limitation, laptops), or other equipment for the purpose of transmitting wireless data over the network."

 

 

 

I am getting really sick and tired of many of you people. More and more, I am not sure why I bother to provide my dozen years of wireless research experience to this forum to help you understand Network Vision. Sprint is doing a complete network renovation, but many of you yahoos are going to drag down Network Vision in just a few years with your "unlimited" data usage because you cannot exercise a small amount of self control and common courtesy to the subs around you.

 

The sooner that Sprint encourages or even forces people to monitor their data usage on the macro network, the better.

 

AJ

 

A TV isn't a personal computer.

 

I think a better example is the Motorola Photon's lapdock. Sprint sold that device to customers while allowing them to maintain their unlimited plans.

 

You could imply that, what is essentially a USB keyboard, a charging pack, and a display over HDMI, does not violate the T's and C's set forth.

 

It's up for Sprint to set reasonable terms for network use, and for Sprint to enforce them. If Sprint says the plan is unlimited and the guy is following the terms and conditions of his unlimited plan, he is merely using the service he signed up for.

 

You can't have it both ways. You can't get the sub adds (revenue) based on a promise that you can use unlimited then give arbitrary limits on what is considered fair use.

 

Sprint made a very clear choice. Embrace unlimited and tolerate the small percentage of users who fall out of normal usage patters in an effort to capture new subscribers and limit subscriber losses. It is what it is. Sprint offers unlimited knowing that a small percentage of customers adversely impact the customer experience for the rest of the customers. I am sure it comes down to a cost/benefit analysis on unlimited. When it no longer makes sense (costs them more to offer than what they gain) they will end unlimited. Until then, it's an attractive marketing tactic that is used to differentiate Sprint from AT&T and Verizon. It obviously has made such an impact that T-Mobile brought back "truly unlimited" data plans.

 

If I had a job working as a security guard or something and could watch TV on my phone to kill time at my very boring job, I would probably stream hulu, HBO Go and netflix all day with sprint because they told me I can.

 

 

It's like telling people that bought a 500HP mustang that they should have bought a 130hp econo box because that's all they really need. Anything more is an arbitrary waste of oil and that they are driving up the price of oil for everyone else. It's really up to the end user to decide what best fits their needs (within the limits of terms/conditions and the law).

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Oh no, not this again. I would like to apologise for making a ruccus last time.

 

This dead horse has been beaten so hard for so long that it came back to life as a zombie and was then beaten back to death.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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A TV isn't a personal computer.

 

Go back and read the data portion of the Ts and Cs that I cited or even just the phrase that I quoted. What do you not understand about "or other equipment for the purpose of transmitting wireless data over the network" and how that applies to a connected TV?

 

AJ

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How is this any different from watching Netflix on his phone while not at home?

 

Hopefully you are not one of those people that believe if we don't use the data as much on our phone then Sprint won't put in a cap.

 

You seem new here. Read this thread and get back to us:

 

http://s4gru.com/ind...-for-unlimited/

 

Just to warn you, it didn't end well for people with your mentality.

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If I could do this without a phone call and them just logging the usage as I use it. I would never use a 3rd party tethering. I tether maybe every couple months. Might use 10MB. Even less with the note now. But its still a pain to call Sprint to turn on and off, and for as little I use it, I don't feel bad about using an app. But, for the others who go nuts, damn them.

 

 

Sent from my Note 2 using Tapatalk

 

I add it and remove it right from my phone using the Sprint website. Quick and painless.

 

Robert via Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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For you jackasses who love to waste resources, please post about your wastefulness and abuses in the appropriate thread. You aren't happy enough to waste Sprint resources, but you have to waste ours too. I'm sick of this topic and our moderators will no longer allow it to take other threads off topic too.

 

Robert via Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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Go back and read the data portion of the Ts and Cs that I cited or even just the phrase that I quoted. What do you not understand about "or other equipment for the purpose of transmitting wireless data over the network" and how that applies to a connected TV?

 

AJ

 

We can go back and forth on what sprint is implying. As I understand it (and I read a lot of legal stuff), Sprint is implying that you may not tether your device through a personal computer or other such item resulting in data being transmitted through the phone to another device. Since no wireless data is actually being transferred (only displayed, and not stored), it does not violate the T's and C's.

 

My supporting example was the Motorola Lapdock 100 or the HD Dock. Both were sold by sprint at sprint stores and required no plan change.

 

Frankly, lawyers who wrote the T's and C's probably didn't even consider that there would be a smartphone that could mirror the phone's display on a TV. It's a silly argument that two lawyers could argue about all day and not get very far. More likely, we will see sprint revise the T's and C's clearly defining the subject if it becomes a problem.

 

When your phone comes preloaded with DLNA enabled, when your sprint store sells HD media docks and HDMI cables, when you can buy a lapdock from your sprint store, all without changing your plan, a customer is only going to assume that it is allowed by Sprint to use this functionality (and in my opinion, rightly so).

 

Those are all very explicit examples of how sprint supports devices to be used in that manner.

 

Tethering, which the preloaded hotspot app requires separate plan add-on, and is very clearly defined in the terms and conditions, is obviously not allowed with a tethering plan and data usage limit.

 

Anyway, that's my 2 cents. Sprint has never made any enforcement action on data usage related to lapdocks or display devices. Everything sprint has done/does supports the allowed use of docks/lapdocks/hdmi cables/wireless display.

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We can go back and forth on what sprint is implying. As I understand it (and I read a lot of legal stuff), Sprint is implying that you may not tether your device through a personal computer or other such item resulting in data being transmitted through the phone to another device. Since no wireless data is actually being transferred (only displayed, and not stored), it does not violate the T's and C's.

 

My supporting example was the Motorola Lapdock 100 or the HD Dock. Both were sold by sprint at sprint stores and required no plan change.

 

Frankly, lawyers who wrote the T's and C's probably didn't even consider that there would be a smartphone that could mirror the phone's display on a TV. It's a silly argument that two lawyers could argue about all day and not get very far. More likely, we will see sprint revise the T's and C's clearly defining the subject if it becomes a problem.

 

When your phone comes preloaded with DLNA enabled, when your sprint store sells HD media docks and HDMI cables, when you can buy a lapdock from your sprint store, all without changing your plan, a customer is only going to assume that it is allowed by Sprint to use this functionality (and in my opinion, rightly so).

 

Those are all very explicit examples of how sprint supports devices to be used in that manner.

 

Tethering, which the preloaded hotspot app requires separate plan add-on, and is very clearly defined in the terms and conditions, is obviously not allowed with a tethering plan and data usage limit.

 

Anyway, that's my 2 cents. Sprint has never made any enforcement action on data usage related to lapdocks or display devices. Everything sprint has done/does supports the allowed use of docks/lapdocks/hdmi cables/wireless display.

 

This response was probably in progress when I typed my warning above. This is now the end of this subject on this thread.

 

Robert via Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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