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jman02

LTE is finally here, now what? (LTE uses)

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Your "point" violates the rules of this forum, so unless you want a formal reprimand, I suggest you stop discussion on the subject.

Correct. Everyone seems to be pussyfooting around the subject, and skirting the line, let me make it crystal clear.

 

Its against Sprints TOS and against the rules of this forum. This thread should not be a tethering thread. Lets get back to the OP's original question, otherwise this thread will have outlived its usefulness and be closed.

 

Choose, but choose wisely.

indiana-jones-and-the-last-crusade.jpg

 

With that said, lets get back to the topic from the first post of this thread...

 

All,

 

I've been following Sprint's NV in the Chicagoland area since early this year, and now that we're seeing LTE, the question comes to mind, "What now?".

 

More specifically, what are some good uses for LTE? I know that I've struggled with buffering with internet radio and videos, but are there practical uses that require more than a stable 2-3 mbps connection? Please help build a list of ways to make use of our new LTE connections.

 

YouTube HD video

Skype video calls

Internet radio (Slacker, Pandora, Spotify)

VoIP calls

 

 

Thanks

 

TS out

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Browsing S4GRU instead of working, the occasional Netflix show, Pandora in the car. Oh, the joy of unlimited.

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haha Inside the crib. I guess you mean either the loop or your house. Seriously though I wish NV was nearly complete in my market.

 

Lol my bad chi town language haha I meant my house lol

 

Sent from my Sprint Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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when i get connected to LTE i'll connect my EVO to the TV via HD Media Linkto see Netflix and YouTube, and of course, NBA

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when i get connected to LTE i'll connect my EVO to the TV via HD Media Linkto see Netflix and YouTube, and of course, NBA

 

For the sake of discussion, how is this any different than "illegally" tethering a laptop to do the same thing?

 

One simply violates Sprint's TOS but both will use the same amount of bandwidth.

 

Discuss...

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Now that I've actually gotten a chance to use LTE, I find myself using Netflix more, and streaming music.

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Now that I've actually gotten a chance to use LTE, I find myself using Netflix more, and streaming music.

 

Yeah I'm streamin and downloading roms more also oh and more intense android gameplay also

 

Sent from my Sprint Galaxy Nexus rockin 4.2.1 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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I have a torrent down load app I use alot and lot of Netflix, Pandora all on 3G!

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I have a torrent down load app I use alot and lot of Netflix, Pandora all on 3G!

Ouch. I wonder why Sprint's network is so overtaxed in many markets...

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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No kidding! I can see Pandora, and YouTube, and a like. Tethering I can even understand to a point. That's what half of this smart phone stuff is all about. The Carriers know it and if there was an issue, they should stop allowing them on their network and/or block the apps. (and they do the tethering apps) But, Torrents over your phone via 3G or LTE/WiMax is the dumbest thing I ever heard. Only a matter of time before your no longer with Sprint.

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Torrent down loading from an app I'm not tethering to a computer. Just a loop hole I guess.

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Sprint DOESN'T care how much CELL data u use as long as its just cell data

 

Sent from my Sprint Galaxy Nexus rockin 4.2.1 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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It's easy to use a lot of data. I downloaded some videos I wanted to watch on a car trip. I was lucky to be around a tower that pulls 1.5mb or so. I lined up the 800mb that morning and let it eat. I had my videos for that evening.

 

-- "Sensorly or it didn't happen!"

 

 

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"Flabbergasted."

Now there's a word I don't see used much. :blink:

 

I know, I think he should have used Bamboozled

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"Flabbergasted."

 

 

I know, I think he should have used Bamboozled

 

:rofl::lol::rofl:

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:rofl::lol::rofl:

 

We, who have had our flabbers gasted, are not laughing.

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For the sake of discussion, how is this any different than "illegally" tethering a laptop to do the same thing?

 

One simply violates Sprint's TOS but both will use the same amount of bandwidth.

 

Discuss...

 

i'm not violating Sprint TOS, i'm not using tethering... the Media Link HD is a DLNA reciever for the HDTV...

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i'm not violating Sprint TOS, i'm not using tethering... the Media Link HD is a DLNA reciever for the HDTV...

 

I didn't say you were violating the TOS. My point was that you are using the same amount of bandwidth.

 

Everyone's argument against illegal tethering is bandwidth utlization.

 

Legal vs illegal tethering is just another way from Sprint or any provider to make more money.

 

They should allow for tethering but like ISPs monitor and penalize those offending <1% that dowload >100GB a month.

 

Heck I only use about 20GB a month with my ISP at home.

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i'm not violating Sprint TOS, i'm not using tethering... the Media Link HD is a DLNA reciever for the HDTV...

 

Actually, you could be violating the Ts and Cs if you are streaming video too often, using too much data, and/or affecting others' ability to use the network.

 

Examples of prohibited data uses: Sprint data services are provided solely for purposes of web surfing, sending and receiving email, photographs and other similar messaging activities, and the non-continuous streaming of videos, downloading of files or on line gaming. Our data services may not be used: (i) to generate excessive amounts of Internet traffic through the continuous, unattended streaming, downloading or uploading of videos or other files or to operate hosting services including, but not limited to, web or gaming hosting; (ii) to maintain continuous active network connections to the Internet such as through a web camera or machine-to-machine connections that do not involve active participation by a person; (iii) to disrupt email use by others using automated or manual routines, including, but not limited to "auto-responders" or cancel bots or other similar routines; (iv) to transmit or facilitate any unsolicited or unauthorized advertising, telemarketing, promotional materials, "junk mail", unsolicited commercial or bulk email, or fax; (v) for activities adversely affecting the ability of other people or systems to use either Sprint’s wireless services or other parties’ Internet-based resources, including, but not limited to, "denial of service" (DoS) attacks against another network host or individual user; (vi) for an activity that connects any device to Personal Computers (including without limitation, laptops), or other equipment for the purpose of transmitting wireless data over the network (unless customer is using a plan designated for such usage); or (vi) for any other reason that, in our sole discretion violates our policy of providing service for individual use. Unlimited Use Plans. If you subscribe to rate plans, services or features that are described as unlimited, you should be aware that such "unlimited" plans are subject to these Sprint Prohibited Network Uses.

 

AJ

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Having a small tethering data allotment of less than 1 GB per month would be an elegant solution for Sprint to include in plans. However, adding a hotspot as needed and taking it off when done is a very cheap option I employ every so often.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

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i'm not violating Sprint TOS, i'm not using tethering... the Media Link HD is a DLNA reciever for the HDTV...

I didn't say you were violating the TOS. My point was that you are using the same amount of bandwidth.

 

Regardless, there is really no reason to be using the network to stream video from a handset to a TV at home. That is bush league. Instead, that is a classic Wi-Fi offloading activity.

 

AJ

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Regardless, there is really no reason to be using the network to stream video from a handset to a TV at home. That is bush league. Instead, that is a classic Wi-Fi offloading activity.

 

AJ

 

Why not?

 

Does not violate TOS.

 

Is using software allowed by Sprint (Netflix).

 

Is using a capability of the phone.

 

As quoted by WiWavelength:

 

Examples of prohibited data uses: Sprint data services are provided solely for purposes of web surfing, sending and receiving email, photographs and other similar messaging activities, and the non-continuous streaming of videos, downloading of files or on line gaming.

 

What is the harm in it?

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What is the harm in it?

 

It is a continuous, high data rate activity that sucks up capacity from the macro network, and that detrimentally affects the ability of truly mobile users to use the macro network. After all, these are mobile devices, folks, not "sit at home and use the macro network when you should offload to Wi-Fi" devices.

 

AJ

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It is a continuous, high data rate activity that sucks up capacity from the macro network, and that detrimentally affects the ability of truly mobile users to use the macro network. After all, these are mobile devices, folks, not "sit at home and use the macro network when you should offload to Wi-Fi" devices.

 

AJ

 

How is this any different from watching Netflix on his phone while not at home?

 

Hopefully you are not one of those people that believe if we don't use the data as much on our phone then Sprint won't put in a cap.

Edited by TheRealNaNa

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How is this any different from watching Netflix on his phone while not at home?

 

It may or may not be, just as tethering may or may not drive more data traffic. But in both cases, the potential for abuse is high. In this case, watching video on an HDTV tends to be more palatable than watching video on a 4.7 inch screen. So, people tend to do it more often and do it for longer periods.

 

In any case, streaming video over the macro network from a handset to a TV almost certainly violates the Ts and Cs, since it is "an activity that connects any device to Personal Computers (including without limitation, laptops), or other equipment for the purpose of transmitting wireless data over the network."

 

Hopefully you are not one of those people that believe if we don't use the data as much on our phone then Sprint won't put in a cap.

 

I am getting really sick and tired of many of you people. More and more, I am not sure why I bother to provide my dozen years of wireless research experience to this forum to help you understand Network Vision. Sprint is doing a complete network renovation, but many of you yahoos are going to drag down Network Vision in just a few years with your "unlimited" data usage because you cannot exercise a small amount of self control and common courtesy to the subs around you.

 

The sooner that Sprint encourages or even forces people to monitor their data usage on the macro network, the better.

 

AJ

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