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Concept: Could Softbank/Sprint Purchase Dish Network?


Arysyn
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This idea came to mind just a moment ago when I was reading a thread here, where a member is concerned about Sprint's plans to cancel Wimax home internet service in their area around Ohio. Robert replied, mentioning Sprint is working with Dish Network on a home internet service trial in Texas, which got me thinking...

 

Could Softbank/Sprint possibly buy Dish Network, seeing as they were involved in the huge merger deal between each other over a year ago. I'm also wondering if Masayoshi Son is waiting to see how the AT&T merger with Directv goes, before making any firm decision about it. After all, it'll probably be much more likely to pass FCC approval than the merger idea of Sprint/T-Mobile was.

 

I'd really like for such a merger between Softbank/Sprint/Dish to happen, as Dish purchased a bunch of AWS spectrum here in Chicago back in the AWS auction, which a merger with Sprint would make the already great Chicago network even more powerful, and would allow me to ditch AT&T UVerse home internet service for good, without having to rely on Comcast Xfinity for it, granted if the Dish/Sprint home internet service would be available here, not just a merger happening.

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If the FCC approves the AT&T - DirecTV merger, they would have to approve a Sprint - Dish merger with the same conditions.

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If the FCC approves the AT&T - DirecTV merger, they would have to approve a Sprint - Dish merger with the same conditions.

You would think so...

 

But do you think it would be wise to try and purchase Dish? It would cost a lot, I would guess around $50 billion.

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If the FCC approves the AT&T - DirecTV merger, they would have to approve a Sprint - Dish merger with the same conditions.

 

No.  Compared to DirecTV, Dish is an entirely different animal -- now that Charlie has acquired something on the order of 100 MHz of unused wireless spectrum that is classified for or has been converted to terrestrial mobile use.  Add that to Sprint's spectrum holdings, and the FCC would have to look at undue spectrum aggregation. 

 

AJ

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You would think so...

 

But do you think it would be wise to try and purchase Dish? It would cost a lot, I would guess around $50 billion.

I have always thought a move like this makes sense.  Imagine small remotely configurable CMDA/LTE repeater antennas integrated into the satellite dishes on people homes powered by the customer's satellite receiver.  This is small cell heaven.

 

The wire running into the customer's home would carry both TV and internet and the repeater would broadcast CDMA/LTE signals a few thousand feet for those users on the edge of a coverage hole. Sprint could offer their customers fixed wireless LTE over the repeater antenna connection, dramatically expand their coverage footprint, add streaming video to Dish, offer fixed home telephone service, and offer mobile, internet, satellite TV, home telephone bundles.  In addition, they would gain access to Dish's spectrum holdings which are significant and could help bolster home fixed LTE internet and all of this would be available in the new SprintShack stores.

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The premium price Charlie Ergen would demand isn't supported by Dish's existing revenue. The value is hedged entirely on the future opportunity of the spectrum. There will be huge buildout costs behind using that spectrum... And they're not supported by rural wireless broadband revenue either. Charlie may be amassing a package that can't be reasonably bought by anyone without significant divestment to multiple others, even if he abandoned his premium price.

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