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darickster09

Bell LTE Canada

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Hey guys so this is a bit off topic from Sprint LTE, but i am just curious about something.  I live near Seattle, so therefore I am relatively close to the Canada border.  So i got curious about what type of phone services are offered in Canada.  So i found a company called Bell Mobility who offer 4G LTE all over Canada.  The thing I am wondering about is the part where they say they can achieve up to 150 Mbps.  How is it possible for them to do that?  What type of LTE are they using?  From looking at their coverage map its available in very limited areas like Toronto and a few others.  Do they use Carrier Aggregation?  Is that how they can achieve 150Mbps?  Here is the link to their site if you all want to check it out.  I just through it was interesting :)

 

http://network.bell.ca/en/coverage

 

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They use band 4, and band 7(2600) for capacity. So prolly a similar setup to Sprint. They are testing out the band 12 I believe in select markets.

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Oh cool.  yeah i figured.  Wonder if anyone actually has gotten that 150 Mbps speed yet.  that would be pretty sweet!

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Oh cool.  yeah i figured.  Wonder if anyone actually has gotten that 150 Mbps speed yet.  that would be pretty sweet!

prolly not , I thought up there you pay more for access to the higher speed tiers of data

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I'm pretty sure it's just a 20x20 like XLTE or Wideband LTE here is.

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Was recently in Canada for a few days and shopped around the major providers as well as big prepaid MVNO's... All I have to say is Canadians are getting royally shafted on cellular plans while keeping the USD <--> CAD conversion in mind.   150Mbps is cool and all but it seems a bit pointless with how fast you'll reach your 500MB-15GB cap.  Though, I do see the benefits of overall customer experience due to the capacity. 

 

So, I suffered with T-Mobile 128Kbps~ data roaming instead which ended up working out just fine to lookup directions and whatnot with Google Maps.

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Was recently in Canada for a few days and shopped around the major providers as well as big prepaid MVNO's... All I have to say is Canadians are getting royally shafted on cellular plans while keeping the USD <--> CAD conversion in mind.   150Mbps is cool and all but it seems a bit pointless with how fast you'll reach your 500MB-15GB cap.  Though, I do see the benefits of overall customer experience due to the capacity. 

I am in Montreal for the week and I can say this is 110% true. I was going to switch to a local provider for the week but when I saw how much they wanted, I decided Sprint roaming and WiFi hunting was the way to go. Sprint offers unlimited texts and calls for $.2 a minute with the add on. This is actually pretty good in the industry. However data roaming at $2 per MB is pretty steep. Whoever I am roaming on while in Montreal is adding service to the subway, as many stations now have service underground.

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I am in Montreal for the week and I can say this is 110% true. I was going to switch to a local provider for the week but when I saw how much they wanted, I decided Sprint roaming and WiFi hunting was the way to go. Sprint offers unlimited texts and calls for $.2 a minute with the add on. This is actually pretty good in the industry. However data roaming at $2 per MB is pretty steep. Whoever I am roaming on while in Montreal is adding service to the subway, as many stations now have service underground.

 

That's where I just got back from.  Fantastic city!

 

I was thoroughly impressed at in-building coverage wherever I went while even switching between the major carriers.  Mostly to see if there was any significant differences.  (There weren't that I noticed)  I couldn't help but always scan the buildings to see the panel placements while I was walking around.

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That's where I just got back from.  Fantastic city!

 

I was thoroughly impressed at in-building coverage wherever I went while even switching between the major carriers.  Mostly to see if there was any significant differences.  (There weren't that I noticed)  I couldn't help but always scan the buildings to see the panel placements while I was walking around.

It is a wonderful city. We rented an apartment for the week while I am at a conference. Our neighbors are the nciest people on the planet. I do wish I could speak some French, but alas I took Spanish in high school. I too am looking for the panels and watching my service. I have been shocked at some of the places I still have service. And NYC could take a lesson from Montreal in how to properly clean a subway system.

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