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The Snapdragon 805 doesn't have an embedded modem.


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http://www.anandtech.com/show/8035/qualcomm-snapdragon-805-performance-preview

 

In order to accommodate the wider memory interface but still make Snapdragon 805 suitable for use in a smartphone as well as a tablet, Qualcomm turned to a different packaging technology. Since the Snapdragon 805 is an APQ part, it lacks the integrated modem of the MSM SoCs we've found in most of Qualcomm's recent flagships.

Won't this kill battery life since the radio will require an alternate power source now?

 

Sent from my LG-LS980

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http://www.anandtech.com/show/8035/qualcomm-snapdragon-805-performance-preview

 

 

Won't this kill battery life since the radio will require an alternate power source now?

 

No.  While I would rather see the cellular baseband on the same SoC in an MSM configuration rather than an APQ configuration, the battery drain difference for the latter at this point is difficult to judge, hence minimal.

 

And I think that Anand overstates the case when he says "most of Qualcomm's recent flagships."  Last year, the HTC One, Samsung Galaxy S4, LG Optimus G, et al., all used separate Snapdragon APQ and Gobi MDM chipsets.  This seems to be a cycle with Qualcomm.  The year prior, most of the flagships -- such as the Samsung Galaxy S3 -- were on an MSM platform, thus incorporating both processor and baseband onto the same SoC.

 

So, much of 2014 will be APQ plus MDM.  Then, 2015 will be focused on a new flagship MSM that combines both processor and baseband.

 

AJ

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Pretty sure all the upcoming chips past the 805 are integrated solutions. Somewhat the reason why you haven't seen crazy adoption rate of it in the first place. My suspicion is that it will land in "most" of these 5.5" devices coming. End of this year we will see the 600 series and 808/810 rolling out... Kinda a wash honestly.

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I didn't realize 805 was going to be the end of the line for Krait. RIP.

 

The good news is that the MDM9635 is a significant step forward in number of LTE bands and connectivity. I'm hoping this leads to Sprint handsets supporting all the LTE and TD-LTE bands for the US, Canada, Europe, Japan, and China. My hypothetical band support setup?

 

CDMA 1X/EVDO: Band Class 0, 1, 10, (Cellular, PCS, Secondary Cellular)

GSM: 800,900,1800,1900

UMTS: 850,900,AWS,1900,2100

LTE: 1,2,3,4,5,7,8,12,13,17,20,25,26,38,39,40,41

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I didn't realize 805 was going to be the end of the line for Krait. RIP.

 

It seems the general consensus is that Qualcomm will release their own 64-bit architecture after next year's SD 808/810. Anand hinted as much in an earlier article:

 

Unlike the rest of the 64-bit Snapdragon family, the 808 and 810 likely won't show up in devices until the first half of 2015 (410 devices will arrive in Q3 2014, while 610/615 will hit in Q4). The 810 will come first (and show up roughly two quarters after the Snapdragon 805, which will show up two quarters after the recently released 801). The 808 will follow shortly thereafter. This likely means we won't see Qualcomm's own 64-bit CPU microarchitecture show up in products until the second half of next year.

 

I don't think anyone outside of Qualcomm knows yet what that architecture will look like. But the Galaxy S7 and its contemporaries will likely use it.

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