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hello i dont know if this question has been answered or is even in the right topic but dose network vision also include raising the power output of a tower  ? and how high are they allowed to transmit at ? answer would be appreciatd

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You can't really just crank up the transmission power at a site.  It's a delicate balance.  Radio communications are two way.  If they crank up the power, the signal may reach farther, but your device won't reach a transmission back.  It no workee.  Devices are really the limiting factor in signal strength.

 

Robert

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The Samsung radio heads are incapable of outputting more than 40 Watts per carrier "channel", but for every carrier you add to a radio, the power of the other carriers must be reduced in order to prevent interference. A big factor for CDMA is how many users are on each sector/carrier. The more users you have, the lower the power output is. Defining a generic distance that each sector covers is impossible, I could spend days coming up with factors that affect how individual sector/carriers operate

Legacy systems used tower top pre-amplifiers and massive ground mounted bi-directional amplifiers to overcome the loss in the feedlines and attempt to increase the footprint of a site. With the new remote radio heads, that loss in no longer an issue.

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You can't really just crank up the transmission power at a site.  It's a delicate balance.  Radio communications are two way.  If they crank up the power, the signal may reach farther, but your device won't reach a transmission back.  It no workee.  Devices are really the limiting factor in signal strength.

 

Robert

Crank it at 100 percent! So your feel that radiation lol

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Crank it at 100 percent! So your feel that radiation lol

 

All kidding aside, if the power was constantly cranked to 100%, your phone would never work right.

 

Just as Robert mentioned, forward link and reverse link power is a delicate balance. If a handset fails to listen to the power control commands sent by the BSC, it can shut down an entire sector. Yes, a single 300mW handset can destroy the reverse link if it's close enough and doesn't power down when told to. The forward link power isn't as critical as the reverse link, but if it's too high, you'll never hand off properly and you would drop calls left and right.

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All kidding aside, if the power was constantly cranked to 100%, your phone would never work right.

 

Just as Robert mentioned, forward link and reverse link power is a delicate balance. If a handset fails to listen to the power control commands sent by the BSC, it can shut down an entire sector. Yes, a single 300mW handset can destroy the reverse link if it's close enough and doesn't power down when told to. The forward link power isn't as critical as the reverse link, but if it's too high, you'll never hand off properly and you would drop calls left and right.

its a joke.  I knew that.  Have to optimize the towers to surrounding ones

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In Montana my Verizon phone has connected to towers 20-25 miles away. In this rural setting would those towers be cranking 100%?

 

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

 

 

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In Montana my Verizon phone has connected to towers 20-25 miles away. In this rural setting would those towers be cranking 100%?

 

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

Again, there really is no way to quantify 100% power, but in Montana, especially in the more rural areas, there are fewer users so the footprint of a given site will be larger. I've seen sites register on my test gear about 60 miles out, but the conditions were perfect. That brings up another subject... Propagation. There are factors that will affect your reception that are not in the physical realm; solar conditions, EMI, other RF, atmospheric conditions, etc...

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