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Can anyone clarify me a doubt


elkaku
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I need someone that can explain tue differences between this.... So i can explain it to a stubborn AT&T user ....

 

3G, 4G, LTE eHRPD, cdma HSPA and HSPA+ etc...and also why at&t connects to all three of 3g 4g and lte and which is faster

 

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A good place to start is the FAQ here: http://s4gru.com/ind...sked-questions/

 

I'm not the expert but I don't think there is not one simple answer to which is faster. A strong 3G on a lightly loaded tower may be faster than a weak signal on a overloaded tower. LTE does seem to be more efficient moving more data in less room than some of the others and it can scale to very fast. I will let someone else give a better answer. I hope this tides you over till then

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I'll try as best I can, but I am definitely one of the less knowledgable people here. Here goes nothing.

3G and 4G are overarching terms for third generation (3G) and fourth generation (4G) wireless data transmission technologies. There are certain speed and latency standards that must be met for something to qualify as "4G." CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access) and GSM (Global System for Mobile communications) are two different branches of cellular access. I don't know how they actually work and differ, sorry, but Sprint and Verizon use CDMA and AT&T and T-Mobile use GSM.

LTE (Long Term Evolution) is the real 4G, and is the only 4G technology truly certified as such. However....

WiMax came along and it was so much faster than regular old CDMA that Sprint decided to call it "4G." However, this sort of ruined everything in terms of naming schemes. WiMax was technically not 4G, but Sprint called it that, so whatever.

HSPA and HSPA+ (Evolved High Speed Packet Access) are 3G technologies citation needed, however they are significantly faster than regular old 3G, so AT&T decided to call it 4G just as Sprint had with WiMax.

When LTE came along with Verizon, there was a conflict between Faux-G (Punny, eh?) and real 4G, LTE. So now we have 4G LTE, 4G, and 3G. It's not pretty.

eHRPD (enhanced High Rate Packet Data) is just a handoff between 3G and LTE.

The speeds go from LTE>>>HSPA+>>CDMA/GSM

All of this information is in the FAQ: http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/1704-frequently-asked-questions/

Hopefully my explanation of these things makes some sort of sense, and the FAQ is almost definitely more helpful and knowledgeable.

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LTE (Long Term Evolution) is the real 4G, and is the only 4G technology truly certified as such. However....

WiMax came along and it was so much faster than regular old CDMA that Sprint decided to call it "4G." However, this sort of ruined everything in terms of naming schemes. WiMax was technically not 4G, but Sprint called it that, so whatever.

 

No. But good effort...

 

AJ

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I need someone that can explain tue differences between this.... So i can explain it to a stubborn AT&T user ....

 

3G, 4G, LTE eHRPD, cdma HSPA and HSPA+ etc...and also why at&t connects to all three of 3g 4g and lte and which is faster

 

posted using J.A.R.V.I.S.

 

The G's are superficial designations (not technologies or protocols) for wireless generations or G's

 

1G - The original analogue voice only cellular technologies such as AMPS

 

2G - This generation ushers in digital voice, text messaging and basic data access. Examples include cdmaONE, GPRS and EDGE

 

3G - This generation brings with it simultaneous voice and data as well as a minimum data rate requirement (~128kbps I think). In reality, most carriers' services serve data speeds that are much faster and most customers expect at least 400 kbps for the connection to be worthy of the 3G name. Some carriers marketed their 2G networks as 3G including Sprint due to the high data rates their networks served which were well beyond the required data rates for 3G. The networks were not 3G because they didn't allow for simultaneous voice and data. This has changed recently with SVDO handsets. Sprint and Verizon now have real 3G.

 

4G - This generation is murky, very murky in definition. The general idea is constant however, data rates significantly higher than incumbent 3G networks. Originally the ITU set the definition to be a technology that has the spectral efficiency to support 100mbps data rates for moving end users and 1 Gbps speeds for stationary users with a 20 x 20 mhz carrier (20 mhz downlink, 20 mhz uplink). Many carriers are marketing vastly inferior networks to this standard as 4G. These carriers wanted something new to market to get an edge over competitors. Like a lobbyist with deep pockets, these carriers abused their influence to coerce the ITU into lowering the bar for 4G technologies. After this, the ITU agreed to call HSPA+, LTE (rel 8), and the original WiMax, as 4G. There are only two technologies which satisfy the original definition, LTE advanced (rel 10) and WiMax 2.

 

The technologies that are used for these generations (designed to satisfy their requirements) are....

 

GPRS - this 2G GSM technology has max speeds of 48kbps. It is used by T-Mobile

and AT&T to a much lesser extent

 

EDGE - this 2G GSM technology is an update to GPRS. It has maximum speeds around 256kbps. It is used by AT&T and T-Mobile.

 

CDMA 1xRTT - this 2G CDMA technology is an update to the now obsolete cdmaONE technology. It has maximum speeds of around 256kbps as well. This is used by Sprint, Verizon, Cricket, MetroPCS and US Cellular.

 

CDMA EV-DO - this technology when combined with the SVDO update is a 3G technology. It has maximum real world data rates of around 2.5 Mbps. This is also used by Sprint, Verizon, Cricket, MetroPCS and US Cellular.

 

UMTS - This is a 3G GSM protocol used for voice and higher speed data. I don't know the maximum data rate, it should be no more than 768 kbps. It is used by AT&T and T-Mobile.

 

HSPA - This 3G technology is used for data at speeds of up to 7.2 mbps. It is used by AT&T and T-Mobile.

 

HSPA+ - This 3G/4G is an upgrade to HSPA to enable faster data rates. Depending on the release it can enable dual carrier bonding (DC-HSPA+ or HSPA+42) and MIMO. The speeds are typically half of the rated speed for example HSPA+21 yields real world speeds of around 10mbps. This is used by AT&T and T-Mobile. AT&T uses HSPA+14.4 and T-Mobile uses HSPA+42/DC-HSPA+.

 

DC-HSPA+/HSPA+42 - I feel this deserves its own section for a good reason. It's fast almost as fast as LTE. You can see average data rates of 15~20mbps. It does however have higher latency than LTE. This technology is used by T-Mobile.

 

WiMax (original) - This 3G/4G technology is a technology that employs MIMO and OFDMA (like wifi) to achieve fast data rates. It is a TDD technology which usually makes use of very high frequency spectrum putting the technology at a coverage disadvantage compared to the generally lower frequency spectrum used by current LTE providers.

 

WiMax 2 - This 4G technology is an update to WiMax (original). Very few providers will use it (no major providers in the US).

 

LTE (rel 8 & 9) - This 3G/4G technology is a technology that employs MIMO and OFDMA (like wifi) to achieve fast data rates. The carriers can range in size from 1.4x1.4mhz to 20x20mhz in size. To find a rough estimate of the data rate, multiply the carrier size by 7. For example 5x5 LTE has a max data rate around 35mbps. Sprint, MetroPCS, and US Cellular are deploying 5x5 LTE carriers as is AT&T in some areas. Verizon and AT&T (sometimes) have deployed 10x10 LTE carriers. T-Mobile plans to deploy carriers ranging from 5x5 to 20x20 depending on the market.

 

LTE Advanced (rel 10) - This 4G technology is an update to LTE (rel 8 & 9). It employs greater MIMO capabilities to increase spectral efficiency (faster speeds). The carriers for this technology can be assymetrical (or varying downlink and uplink bandwidths) on wholly different spectrum types. It also has the ability to bond carriers together and make better use of small cells. I can't speak for what the data speeds will be like but they should work at least as well as the ITU required 100mbps at 20x20mhz carriers. This technology has been anounced to be used by Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon.

 

eHRPD - This is an update to EV-DO to enable smooth handoffs from LTE to EV-DO. It also is different in that the connection is trunked through the LTE core as opposed to the existing EV-DO core (sometimes improves speeds).

 

AT&T in particular uses GPRS and EDGE for 2G technologies, UMTS, HSPA and HSPA+ for 3G, and finally (depending on your opinion and definition) HSPA+ and LTE for "4G" or has no 4G at all.

 

All AT&T LTE devices can make use of all of these technologies.

 

Sprint devices (except a hybrid hotspot) are either 3G EV-DO only, 3G EV-DO and 4G WiMax, or 3G EV-DO and 4G LTE.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

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The G's are superficial designations (not technologies or protocols) for wireless generations or G's

 

Not quite, the Evo 4G design was a world phone with CDMA/GSM/WIMAX and the iPhone 4S CDMA/GSM, iPhone 5 CDMA/GSM/LTE, BlackBerry Bold 9930 and 9850 Torch are world phones with CDMA/GSM, and the Atrix 4g was a world phone I believe with wimax.

 

By the way, the "G" just stands for generation.

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

Edited by WiWavelength
excessively long quote
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Not quite, the Evo 4G design was a world phone with CDMA/GSM/WIMAX and the iPhone 4S CDMA/GSM, iPhone 5 CDMA/GSM/LTE, BlackBerry Bold 9930 and 9850 Torch are world phones with CDMA/GSM, and the Atrix 4g was a world phone I believe with wimax.

 

I think that he was referring to Sprint devices that run on Sprint’s network types, those types being EV-DO, WiMAX, and LTE.

 

By the way, the "G" just stands for generation.

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

His first line…

 

The G's are superficial designations (not technologies or protocols) for wireless generations or G's

 

He’s saying that “G” stands for “generation,” but that the word “generation” (and by extension, “G”) does not refer to any single type of technology or protocol (e.g., “3G” can encompass EV-DO or HSPA).

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I think that he was referring to Sprint devices that run on Sprint’s network types, those types being EV-DO, WiMAX, and LTE.

 

 

 

His first line…

 

 

 

He’s saying that “G” stands for “generation,” but that the word “generation” (and by extension, “G”) does not refer to any single type of technology or protocol (e.g., “3G” can encompass EV-DO or HSPA).

 

But you failed to realize that all those devices I referenced are Sprint devices. Sprint also sale world phones also which guess what? Have GSM in them also.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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I cant thank enough all of you guys..... I'm starting to understand all the terms now.... Keep on bringing the info!!!

 

posted using J.A.R.V.I.S.

 

 

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But you failed to realize that all those devices I referenced are Sprint devices. Sprint also sale world phones also which guess what? Have GSM in them also.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

I understood that you referenced Sprint devices that have the *ability* to run on GSM networks, but read this again and pay attention to the information that he’s trying to convey:

 

AT&T in particular uses GPRS and EDGE for 2G technologies, UMTS, HSPA and HSPA+ for 3G, and finally (depending on your opinion and definition) HSPA+ and LTE for "4G" or has no 4G at all.

 

All AT&T LTE devices can make use of all of these technologies.

 

Sprint devices (except a hybrid hotspot) are either 3G EV-DO only, 3G EV-DO and 4G WiMax, or 3G EV-DO and 4G LTE.

 

He started by using AT&T’s *technologies* to show examples of 2G, 3G, and 4G networks. From there, he went on to state that all of AT&T’s LTE phones can use all of AT&T’s technologies. To tie it into something that we as a Sprint forum can relate to, he listed the 3G and 4G technologies that Sprint uses.

 

Regardless of whether or not a Sprint device can run on a GSM network, while that device is connected to the Sprint network, it will only run on EV-DO, WiMAX, and/or LTE. Again, I understand that the devices you listed have the *ability* to connect to GSM networks, but they will not use any GSM technology while connected to Sprint (unless you consider LTE a GSM technology, but that was a whole other thread).

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