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RedSpark

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Everything posted by RedSpark

  1. But how could Ericsson perform so poorly? Was Sprint’s outsourcing to them just a really bad idea from the beginning and beyond their scope of expertise?
  2. Sprint and Ericsson renewed certain portions of their managed services contract in 2016: https://www.ericsson.com/en/press-releases/2016/7/sprint-and-ericsson-renew-portions-of-managed-services-partnership John Saw posted about it: https://newsroom.sprint.com/the-operational-side-of-our-network-transformation.htm Sprint took in some Ericsson employees as part of the renewal (Some of whom were former Sprint employees): https://www.kansascity.com/news/business/technology/article92233777.html https://www.fiercewireless.com/wireless/sprint-to-take-some-ericsson-employees-as-companies-renew-parts-network-outsourcing-pact Some history from the FierceWireless article on the original deal announced in July 2009: The network-outsourcing pact was initially announced in July 2009, with Sprint transferring 6,000 employees to the Swedish gear vendor and Ericsson taking over day-to-day operations of the CDMA, iDEN and wireline networks. The outsourcing arrangement, which was big enough to merit its own name – the companies dubbed it "Network Advantage" – was hailed as a "game changer" at the time by one analyst.” Some more interesting background: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20090713006068/en/Sprint-Managed-Services-Deal-Ericsson-Network-Operations https://www.lightreading.com/ethernet-ip/ericsson-sprint-in-$5b-managed-services-deal/d/d-id/669095 Apparently, Ericsson didn’t manage things well. I’m sure others here have much more detailed knowledge on what went wrong.
  3. Given how competent Ericsson seems at developing new network equipment, I still can’t believe how bad they were at managing it as part of the Managed Services Contract it had with Sprint a while back. I guess all is forgiven now?
  4. Hopefully there’s more to come around town soon! It’s amazing how much smaller the equipment footprint is.
  5. I was very pleased with my speeds at Nationals Park, although I mainly focused on the game. Nationals beat the D-Backs 15-5 and it was a heck of a show. https://www.mlb.com/news/matt-adams-homers-twice-nats-split-series-with-d-backs Matt Adams homered twice and collected seven RBIs, including a grand slam launched 438 feet into center field in the eighth, to help power the Nationals to a 15-5 victory in Sunday’s series finale against the D-backs. Overall, a total of four homers for the Nats! Anyway, back to Sprint’s performance. After the game, I walked back home to Northwest DC and mapped/speed tested in the Rootmetrics App on the way. Covered up from to the Stadium going North on South Capitol Street to over by the Capitol and then along the southern half of the Mall going west to head home. Overall, I saw some substantial speed improvements over what had been previously collected for some areas. You can see some of the areas I mapped in the Rootmetrics App and on the website. I was picking up speeds in excess of 100 Mbps in many places. I didn’t see any speeds below 50 Mbps in my tests. In some areas on my walk, it was clear when I entered within range of an upgraded cell site, as speeds would suddenly zoom up to 150 Mbps. I didn’t have to report any slow speeds in the My Sprint App either, which was nice. I’ll try to cover the Northern section of the National Mall on my next walk down that way, but if anyone who has the Rootmetrics App is out and about wants to cover Penn Quarter/Judiciary Square/NoMA and East of the Capitol, have at it! 😀
  6. At the Nationals Game today! My iPhone XS automatically connected to a private WiFi network “provided by Sprint” at Nationals Park. Check out the data speeds here during the game. Nice job Sprint! Here’s the speeds over the WiFi:
  7. That pricing seems to be with a new line of service. Footnote 1: Samsung S10 5G $40.28/month after $13.89/month credit, applied within two bills. With approved credit, 18-monthly lease payments, new line of service. If you cancel early, remaining balance due. Silver color. 256GB Memory SRP: $1299.99. Requires capable plan. 5G coverage will be limited in select cities. Speed claim requires optimal 5G connection. See Sprint.com/sprint5G for actual coverage and availability.
  8. U.S. judge sets pre-trial hearing next week for Sprint/T-Mobile deal Happening on June 21st....
  9. According to the article, it’s likely that the TRO will be approved.... but from what I can tell, it hasn’t been yet.
  10. 17 more? Where did you read that?
  11. One of Sprint’s arguments for a merger is that it lacks sufficient scale to complete without it. Of course, this means that you have to deliberately set aside (in my opinion) the fact that SoftBank, a global mega-corporation owns nearly 85% of it. Sprint is SoftBank USA, but it seems determined to hide that fact.
  12. And now at less favorable terms than before I believe.
  13. One thing that seems lost (either deliberately or ignorantly) so far on these government regulators and in the mainstream channels in support of this merger is that SoftBank is a multi-billion global corporation of which Sprint is merely a piece. I have to believe this is intentional in some respect as to the market narrative. SoftBank’s unwillingness (or inability as has been claimed in the past based on Japanese bank covenants) to invest enough in Sprint to make it an effective competitor should not be made up for by permitting the market to consolidate from four major players to three, to the detriment of customers in my opinion. My response to SoftBank would be: you had enough money for ARM (http://fortune.com/2016/07/18/softbank-arm-iot/), Uber (https://www.vox.com/recode/2019/5/10/18563267/softbank-vision-fund-explainer-uber-wework-slack-ipo), Boston Dynamics (https://finance.yahoo.com/amphtml/news/softbank-pumps-37m-robot-dog-company-boston-dynamics-103522300.html) among other things. A merger doesn’t need to happen, nor should it. SoftBank wants to have its cake and eat it too. If it was up to me, I’d tell them to go pound sand, open their wallet and invest to enable Sprint to compete.... or to divest itself of Sprint and then sell it to someone who wants to.
  14. I’m curious what they wouldn’t want public about it. Any idea?
  15. I read it this way: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Under_seal ”Filed under seal” Filing under seal is a procedure allowing sensitive or confidential information to be filed with a court without becoming a matter of public record.[1] The court generally must give permission for the material to remain under seal.[2]
  16. “The suit was filed under seal in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.” Why was it filed under seal?
  17. I agree that coverage will improve as a result of the merger, and the combination of 600 MHz and 2.5 GHz will create a heck of a network. My issue with this is that the two “also rans” do actually provide competition, and that competitive effect will be reduced if a merger was allowed. The combined entity won’t have anything to offset it. To be honest, I don’t believe there will be additional players to take their place. I believe this merger will be an irreversible mistake.
  18. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-sprint-m-a-t-mobile-exclusive/exclusive-u-s-state-ags-prepare-lawsuit-to-stop-sprint-and-t-mobile-merger-idUSKCN1TC1OW That could put a wrench in things.
  19. “The Delrahim-Pai lunch meeting was held at Washington, D.C., restaurant Central Michel Richard. People with knowledge of the meeting say it’s unclear if Delrahim was persuaded by Pai’s arguments in support of the merger.” Quintessential DC Power Lunch, but I hope this wasn’t billed to the taxpayers. They could have gone to Pret or Panera and had the same conversation. This Town is such a caricature of itself. I really don’t want this merger to go through. Having four carriers ensures enough market competition. There’s no going back if we go to three carriers. I don’t care what divestitures or assurances are given. It won’t matter.
  20. Perhaps the Galaxy Note will be the first lowband 5G device.
  21. Is it possible they’d get a tweaked version with the x55 Modem to support their 600 MHz network?
  22. It certainly could! Nobody will ever do the kind of breakup fee that T-Mobile had with AT&T again. I’m still in disbelief that AT&T agreed to that arrangement: $4B to $6B depending on how you value it. https://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/12/20/att-and-t-mobile-whats-2-billion-among-friends/ It literally saved T-Mobile.
  23. If that’s the case, I don’t think we’ll see a 5G device on T-Mobile until then. I can’t imagine T-Mobile wants to launch a 5G device which lacks support for its 600 MHz 5G.
  24. The S10 5G doesn’t have lowband support (600 MHz) for 5G. The Qualcomm x50 Modem doesn’t support it. It’s a first generation 5G Modem and requires a separate LTE Modem. So the S10 5G will only support 5G on T-Mobile where it has deployed Millimeter Wave. The next version version is Qualcomm’s x55 Modem, which is an absolute monster. It uses a single chip to support from 2G to 5G and from 600 MHz to 6 GHz. (With some luck, this is what we’ll see in the iPhone 5G next year. I can’t imagine Apple would want to have two separate Modems in its devices.) We’re likely to see this in the next Samsung Note this Fall.
  25. Here’s info on this: https://www.fiercewireless.com/wireless/t-mobile-sprint-odds-and-ends-breakup-fee-washington-reaction-vendor-implications-and-more “As noted by Axios, Sprint and T-Mobile won’t have to pay a breakup fee if regulators from the FCC or Department of Justice manage to kill the proposed merger. However, according to documents the companies filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, T-Mobile would owe Sprint $600 million if the company decides to walk away from the transaction, among other circumstances.” I hope it goes right to capex or paying down debt.
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