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Open World In Costa Rica

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Anyone know how Open World performs in Costa Rica.  I have a note 5 compatible with the 1800 gprs, which I know is going to be super slow.  I mainly am just hoping to have enough data to use maps from apps like Waze to navigate while there.  

 

Any experiences in Costa Rica with Open World?

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Anyone know how Open World performs in Costa Rica.  I have a note 5 compatible with the 1800 gprs, which I know is going to be super slow.  I mainly am just hoping to have enough data to use maps from apps like Waze to navigate while there.  

 

Any experiences in Costa Rica with Open World?

 

No experience but being Open World probably means you'll be on Movistar, which is one of the smaller carriers there, as opposed to the huge, state run Kölbi (do let us know if you can roam on them). 

 

That said, Movistar does seem to have nationwide coverage - here's their coverage map by dBm levels. I would not expect coverage in the red areas.

http://movistar.cr/descubre/movil/cobertura-movil

 

According to Wikipedia they use:

GSM-1800 (GPRSEDGE)

850/2100 MHz UMTSHSDPA

1800 MHz  LTE

 

So you should expect 3G/HSPA+ in cities at least, if they're anything like Movistar Mexico.

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No experience but being Open World probably means you'll be on Movistar, which is one of the smaller carriers there, as opposed to the huge, state run Kölbi (do let us know if you can roam on them).

 

That said, Movistar does seem to have nationwide coverage - here's their coverage map by dBm levels. I would not expect coverage in the red areas.

http://movistar.cr/descubre/movil/cobertura-movil

 

According to Wikipedia they use:

GSM-1800 (GPRS, EDGE)

850/2100 MHz UMTS, HSDPA

1800 MHz LTE

 

So you should expect 3G/HSPA+ in cities at least, if they're anything like Movistar Mexico.

When I was there (pre Open World) I got a SIM for Kolbi from a kiosk in the airport. It was less than $20 and I didn't come close to using my data allotment. I was super impressed with their coverage. Strong HSPA+ even in remote mountainous areas.

 

If you plan to do much traveling through the country and Sprint indeed puts you on a carrier with not great coverage, it might be better to just get a local SIM, especially if you're relying on your phone for navigation. If it's just for casual browsing you'll probably be fine.

 

Sent from my Nexus 6P

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