Jump to content

CrossedSignals

S4GRU Member
  • Content Count

    38
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

30 Excellent

About CrossedSignals

  • Rank
    Member Level: Digital

Profile Information

  • Phones/Devices
    Nexus One
  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    The Windy City
  • Here for...
    Friends

Recent Profile Visitors

2,015 profile views
  1. From the airspan spec sheet: 4T4R channels configured as dual sector with LiteCoMP, dual carrier* or 4×4 MIMO*.
  2. https://www.airspan.com/airstrand/ There’s an embedded video with an interview of a Sprint executive discussing the use of this product.
  3. Is this setup a prelude to massive MIMO in that they would add multiple antennas/RRUs to get to the 64T64R or will there be hexecontatetraport (64 port ) setup at some point?
  4. Calls are $ .20/min (free on wifi), texts are free and as far as I know there isn't a limitation on data. It's somewhat confusing given the $5/Month Japan roaming option. It would appear that the roaming option would net you free voice calls and not sure what else.
  5. Speed test and field test information available at: http://lithcustomer.imgur.com
  6. I would have purchased the high speed data as my company would have reimbursed me for the charge. I do think that with AT&T and VZW doing the $10/day to use home rate plan undercuts the value of the $5/day or $25/week offerings from Sprint (and I think T-Mo). As it was, I used about 850Mb of data (mainly for the speed tests) while I was there. The other nice service was Wi-fi calling. I was on a boatload of conference calls back to the U.S. and as of today I had one minute ($.20) of international calling. That was probably more valuable than the high speed data in my case.
  7. Thanks for the reminder. I forgot about the fact that the connection is a quasi VPN back to Sprint and therefore pings suffer.
  8. I have the speedtest screen shots but am not able to upload due to size. To save you the agony of knowing the speeds: Test 1: Tokyo 6:16am: Ping 347ms; DL 18.2Mbps UL 18.31Mbps Test 2: 8:54am Haneda Airport: Ping 358ms; DL: 48.05Mbps; UL: 24.01Mbps Test 3: 5:48AM Tokyo: Ping: 328; DL29.35; UL19.32
  9. I just returned from a business trip to Japan and have some interesting things to report regarding Sprint international roaming on SoftBank. I'm a BYOD customer (aka 1 year free) and therefore my expectations were that I would receive throttled (2G speed data) with the option to purchase 'high speed' data on a daily or weekly basis as needed. On landing and turning on my phone, I received the usual SMS messages welcoming me to Japan and noting rates for calls and texts. However, I also received a message "High-speed data included at no additional cost on this trip!" Hmm... exciting. My trip kept me in downtown Tokyo with a diversion to Yokohama for lunch one day. I definitely did not venture outside urban areas and therefore my experience is not representative as a testimony for the network throughout Japan. In both cities I can attest the network is very dense and I don't recall having a low signal situation anywhere. I was able to use the service just as I use Sprint in the U.S. On my iPhone 6, the hotspot worked great and the speeds were excellent. Towards the end of my trip, I did some speedtests (photos attached) at my hotel and at Haneda airport, connecting to Band 1 and 3. I never did see an instance where I connected to band 41 (but then again I don't have the benefit of SCP and wasn't running around with the field test mode going all the time). I was surprised at the ping times and played around with the servers on speedtest to try and see if there were any changes (nothing) and as you can see whether it was band 1 or 3, downtown Tokyo or the airport, pings were consistently in the ~300ms range (by way of reference the hotel wifi was ~4ms (assume fiber)). Overall it was impressive and considering the usual cost of roaming, the experience was excellent.
  10. Is the doubling of the ping time coincidence or a consequence of using the Magic Box?
  11. Thanks. That might be it. I noticed this morning that PhoneScoop lists the FCC ID's as BCG-E3161A and BCG-E3175A. Clicking the hyperlink to the FCC's website returns a not found error. I was able to find a couple of variants of the iPhone 8, including Model NumberA1897 (no CDMA) and (BCG-E3160) Model Number A1864 (CDMA) /A1899 (same test report).
  12. I'm struggling to find the filings on the FCC's OET website for the iPhone X. I've attempted to search under Grantee Code (BCG) and what I think is the Product Code A1865. I've also scanned through every filing with a Final Action Date of today, looking for listings with lower / upper frequency ranges that correspond to B41. It appears that they've changed the naming convention of the suffix of the FCC IDs which makes it more challenging: Some are BCG-(Apple Model Number); Some are BCG-ExxxxA. Can anyone please lead me to the filing for the iPhone X? Thank you
  13. I could well be incorrect with my logic but given that the iPhone 6 and 6S (and I assume the 7 has and the 7S will continue this trend) both had Band 41 EIRP levels that were >26dBm (HPUE Power Class 2), is it really a relevant point as to whether the iPhone 7S has or doesn't have HPUE? It appears that the iPhone is already providing band 41 uplink performance that is superior to HPUE through positive antenna gain.
×
×
  • Create New...