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Found 179 results

  1. I'm new to this forum, and I've seen people mention cell sites with specific ID's (for example, SF33XC664). Is there any significance to these ID's, and is there a way to decode them? Also, how do I figure out what the cell site ID's are for towers near me? Thanks! I'm excited to start talking on this site more 😀
  2. Tim YuSprint 4G Rollout UpdatesTuesday, May 7, 2019 - 12:00 PM PDT For weeks, rumors have been circulating that Verizon's carrier exclusivity deal to sell Google Pixel devices was ending and other carriers, such as Sprint, will offer them in addition to direct sales from Google. S4GRU has been able to attain information that this is indeed correct and that Sprint will soon be selling Pixel 3, Pixel 3XL, Pixel 3a, and Pixel 3a XL devices. [Google has has announced that Sprint, in addition to other carriers, are selling the device. Source.] Sprint's internal systems have been updated with the devices information and retail stores are receiving shipping information notifying them of the imminent arrival of the Pixel devices. Pricing 1. Pixel 3: $799 2. Pixel 3 XL: $929 3. Pixel 3a: $399 4. Pixel 3a XL: $479 Modem Specifications Pixel 3 GSM 850 / 1900 WCDMA Bands: 2 / 4 / 5 CDMA Band Class: 0 / 1 / 10 LTE Bands: 2 / 4 / 5 / 7 / 12 / 13 / 17 / 25 / 26 / 29 / 30 / 38 / 41 / 48 / 66 / 71 Carrier Aggregation Combinations 2xCA B41 2xCA B25 3xCA B41 4xCA B41 B25 + B26 B25 + B41 Pixel 3 XL GSM 850 / 1900 WCDMA Bands: 2 / 4 / 5 CDMA Band Class: 0 / 1 / 10 LTE Bands: 2 / 4 / 5 / 7 / 12 / 13 / 17 / 25 / 26 / 29 / 30 / 38 / 41 / 48 / 66 / 71 Carrier Aggregation Combinations 2xCA B41 2xCA B25 3xCA B41 4xCA B41 B25 + B26 B25 + B41 Pixel 3a GSM 850 / 1900 WCDMA Bands: 2 / 4 / 5 CDMA Band Class: 0 / 1 / 10 LTE Bands: 2 / 4 / 5 / 7 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 17 / 25 / 26 / 29 / 30 / 38 / 41 / 48 / 66 / 71 Carrier Aggregation Combinations 2xCA 41 3xCA 41 2xCA B25 B25 + B26 2xCA B25 + B26 B25 + B41 B26 + B41 Pixel 3a XL GSM 850 / 1900 WCDMA Bands: 2 / 4 / 5 CDMA Band Class: 0 / 1 / 10 LTE Bands: 2 / 4 / 5 / 7 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 17 / 25 / 26 / 29 / 30 / 38 / 41 / 48 / 66 / 71 Carrier Aggregation Combinations 2xCA 41 3xCA 41 2xCA B25 B25 + B26 2xCA B25 + B26 B25+ B41 B26 +B41 In addition, Sprint has also recently enabled Pixel 3's eSIM support which is likely to be also true with the Pixel 3a devices when it launches. This means there is no need to seek out the correct SIM card for the device to activate it, though a physical sim card is still an alternate option and the S4GRU SIM Card spreadsheet has been updated to include the 3a and 3a XL devices. Pixel ESIM activation guide 1. Connect device to WiFi 2. Go to Settings, Network & internet, Mobile network, Advanced, Carrier. Alternatively search "carrier" in settings 3. Tap "Add Carrier" 4. Login to Sprint Account and select device to receive one time activation code to continue. Select line to activate Pixel on. 5. Pixel should now be activated. ** If ESIM capable Pixel is already activated on line with a SIM card, you may have to activate another Sprint device in its place before you can undergo the ESIM activation steps ** Credit to ingenium for the ESIM guide Pixel 3 G013A, Pixel 3 XL G013C, Pixel 3a G020A, Pixel 3a XL G020G
  3. Sprint announced at MWC trade show in Barcelona that 5G will go live with 4 cities starting in May (Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas and Kansas City ) https://phys.org/news/2019-02-sprint-5g-network-chicago-atlanta.html
  4. Sprint announced the MVNO Google Fi will use its network for 5G in a press release (that is, once there are actually 5G capable phones compatible with Google Fi someday): https://newsroom.sprint.com/sprint-to-provide-5g-wireless-services-for-google-fi.htm This is the first I've heard about Fi and 5G so far. Google has pretty much kept mum on the topic, so I'm somewhat encouraged.
  5. Are you going to start a thread on Hurricane Michael?

  6. Hi everybody I would figure I would start a Sprint volte launch thread. please keep the let's please keep it on topic.
  7. Tim YuSprint 4G Rollout UpdatesWednesday, September 12, 2018 - 12:45 PM PDT [Edit] It has come to the attention of S4GRU that the Magic Box also supports CDMA Voice Today, Sprint announced the newest Magic Box™ to the world. This Magic Box was first spotted in early summer and S4GRU did a quick write up on it here. Today's announcement formally revealed what new technologies this 3rd Generation public release will give to us. The highlights: This is some huge stuff here especially for technology nerds! Previous Magic Box's only utilized LTE UE Relay for backhaul up to 2 carrier aggregation at 2x2 MIMO at 64 QAM modulation. With 3 CA, 256 QAM, and 4x4 MIMO, this new Magic Box has the same capability as a Gigabit Class device on the Sprint™ network! In addition the notes about Wi-FI connection working for backhaul are huge. Sprint Band 25 or Band 41 may not reach indoors or even in some neighborhoods due to macro coverage patterns even though a Magic Box is available to use in a region. By having the option to use locally supplied internet via WiFi as backhaul, this allows Magic Boxes to enter locations where LTE UE Relay does not work. In addition, the ethernet port tidbit may also be a hint that using ethernet backhaul could also be an option. If so, this Magic Box would potentially support 3 choices of backhaul all in one unit; LTE UE Relay, WiFi, and Ethernet! Wow! With the coming arrival of VoLTE opt in in the near future, LTE coverage indoors is a huge concern. The now expanded reach of this new Magic Box into places previously unreachable is a huge step forward. Exciting! Sprint and Airspan sure loves Magic!
  8. I recently went on an 8 day cruise from NYC to the Caribbean that stopped in Turks and Caicos, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. My first stop was Grand Turk and there I opted for the free roaming. My S9+ automatically connected to Flow's (Cable & Wireless) LTE network where I received speeds of around 120kbps on average with boosts of up to 150kbps. Something worth noting is that on speed tests, the server prefers to default to Sprint's Miami server as opposed to local servers. Speeds were more than adequate for any amount of web browsing and honestly felt much faster than in reality. It helps that using Chrome will save you data by not loading pictures on certain sites unless you click them. In Puerto Rico, I connected to Band 13 on the way into the port in San Juan but once I was in the city, my phone never left Band 41. While the phone was usable, speeds remained significantly lower than what I've come to expect from 3xCA in the mainland U.S. Data speeds peaked at around 25-30Mbos but on average were in the 5-10 Mbps range even on LTE+. Signal remained strong everywhere though. Finally in the Dominican Republic, I entered in Amber Cover which is in Puerto Plata. My phone latched onto a weak Band 2 LTE signal in the port from Altice (called Orange Dominicana in SignalCheck). I had trouble loading pages though. Once off of the ship and out in the open, I had a much stronger signal which allowed me to browse the internet without a hitch. Because it was the last day of my trip, while at the beach I decided to purchase the 24 hour high speed pass for $5. My speeds went from 120kbps to 65Mbps in less than 5 seconds. In some areas speeds were slower, particularly at the port where it struggled to break 2Mbps. Now, back on the boat my phone is flipping between weak Band 4 LTE and overloaded Band 5 HSPA+ from Claro (called Verizon Dominicana in SignalCheck Pro). Here is the difference in speed from before and after purchasing the high speed pass.
  9. Tim YuSprint 4G Rollout UpdatesThursday, August 2, 2018 - 12:01 PM PDT It's been a long time coming for Sprint through many trials and tribulations. Now it's finally here! S4GRU was able to obtain confirmations that Sprint is finally ready and prepared to enable Voice over LTE (VoLTE) for subscribers to manually opt into in select markets across the country this coming September. See list at the bottom. As a refresher here are some of the essential points about VoLTE applicable to Sprint: Calls placed over VoLTE will have the QOS tag unlike the current Calling Plus configuration on numerous Sprint devices Like Calling Plus, VoLTE will have no fallback to the legacy 1x voice network. Calls will drop if the LTE signal drops. The voice codec is AMR-WB which one can experience with Calling Plus calls and matches the other carriers VoLTE setups. At this point and time S4GRU does not have a list of compatible VoLTE devices though we do speculate that any device currently running Calling Plus should be able to tap into that very same IMS core Calling Plus utilizes via true VoLTE. In addition, recent Apple iPhone's seems like a sure bet as some users have already experienced VoLTE in live field tests conducted by Sprint. For the non Sprint branded BYOD devices like Google Pixels or unlocked Moto devices the future is quite murky indeed. Sprint VoLTE Soft Launch Market Map See this for map of all Sprint market boundaries Sprint VoLTE Soft Launch Markets .tg {border-collapse:collapse;border-spacing:0;} .tg td{font-family:Arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;padding:10px 5px;border-style:solid;border-width:1px;overflow:hidden;word-break:normal;border-color:black;} .tg th{font-family:Arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;font-weight:normal;padding:10px 5px;border-style:solid;border-width:1px;overflow:hidden;word-break:normal;border-color:black;} .tg .tg-wk8r{background-color:#ffffff;border-color:#ffffff;text-align:center;vertical-align:top} Atlanta / Athens Austin Baltimore Boston Central Jersey Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Colorado Columbus DFW East Kentucky East Michigan Ft. Wayne / South Bend Houston Idaho Indianapolis Kansas LA Metro Las Vegas Long Island Miami / West Palm Milwaukee Minnesota Missouri Nashville New York City Norfolk North Wisconsin Northern Jersey Oklahoma Oregon / SW Washington Orlando Philadelphia Metro Phoenix Pittsburgh Richmond San Antonio SF Bay South Bay South Texas Southern Jersey Tampa Toledo Upper Central Valley Utah Washington DC West Iowa / Nebraska West Virginia
  10. Seth GoodwinSprint 4G Rollout UpdatesMonday, April 30, 2018 - 5:00 PM PDT After three previous attempts during the past four years, something many thought may never happen actually did. On Sunday April 29, T-Mobile announced they were effectively acquiring Sprint in an all stock deal, combining the third and fourth largest carriers in the U.S. wireless market. Pending regulatory approval, the merger is targeted for closing in the first half of 2019. The Deal The deal using an exchange ratio of 0.10256 Sprint shares for each T-Mobile share valued Sprint at approximately $26.5 billion (plus the assumption of Sprint’s $30+ billion in debt) or $6.62 per share using T-Mobile’s Friday closing price of $64.52. The combined company “New T-Mobile” will be owned 41.7% by Deutsche Telekom, T-Mobile's parent company. 27.4% of the company will be owned by Sprint's parent company SoftBank, with the remaining 30.9% owned by the general public and institutional investors. According to terms of the deal announced by both companies in a joint press release, the combined T-Mobile will retain two headquarters in Bellevue, Washington and Overland Park, Kansas. Current T-Mobile CEO John Legere will retain that role at the new company. T-Mobile’s Mike Sievert will serve as President and COO. No Sprint executives were announced to the management team at this time. Deutsche Telekom's Timotheus Höttges will serve as chairman of the company's board of directors, and DT will have 9 seats on the board compared to SoftBank's 4. Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure, and SoftBank Chairman and CEO Masayoshi Son will occupy two of SoftBank’s seats. As opposed to the famous T-Mobile/AT&T attempted tie up several years ago, this deal does not include a breakup fee should the merger fail to pass regulatory approval. Rather, Sprint has independently signed a roaming agreement with T-Mobile for four years that will continue regardless of the outcome of the merger. On the analyst call for the merger announcement Marcelo Claure said this would take effect immediately. As of the time this article was published, specific details pertaining to the roaming agreement and any actual known roaming connections have yet to materialize. The Plan Sprint and T-Mobile will continue operating separately until the conclusion of the merger, something that in and of itself raises multiple questions about this coming year. Hopefully we'll gain some more insights with Sprint's upcoming FY 2017/4th quarter earnings call. Assuming approval, the companies announced that they intend on spending up to $40 billion in the first three years on capital expenditures and consolidating operations into a single entity. According to the press release, this represents almost 50% more than what Sprint and T-Mobile combined had spent over the past three years. At the time of closing, the companies estimate that Sprint and T-Mobile will have approximately 110,000 macro cell towers. Of these, around 35,000 will be decommissioned due to co-location or other redundancies. 10,000 new sites will be added leaving New T-Mobile with approximately 85,000 macro sites. Within the first three years of a combined company it is also estimated that the carrier will have over 50,000 small cells independent of magic boxes. The two carriers currently have around 10,000 combined. The stated plan is to “use T-Mobile as the anchor network” and use selected Sprint “keep” sites to add coverage and density. At a minimum, Sprint’s BRS/EBS 2.5 GHz spectrum will be added to T-Mobile’s sites and T-Mobile’s “full spectrum portfolio” will be deployed on Sprint’s “keep” sites. At face value, this would point toward mainly decommissioning Sprint sites as part of the 35,000-macro site reduction. In actuality we'll see what they do. For example all things equal, if two sites are co-located the greater synergies are in eliminating the tower rack with less favorable lease terms or worse rack location. VoLTE and Two-dot-Five The conference call noted while the goal is to migrate Sprint's CDMA customers to VoLTE as soon as possible, with 20 million Sprint customers having T-Mobile compatible handsets on day one. The intention is to have the total migration to T-Mobile completed over a three-year period without “degrading experience on Sprint’s network.” This suggests at a minimum keeping Sprint’s 1x800 voice service active during the transition as well as a deliberate coordinated process for overall decommissioning of macro sites. The other thing to watch going forward in this area is that T-Mobile makes no mention in their investor presentation toward utilizing anything other than Sprint’s 2.5 spectrum on their sites. A Sprint T-Mobile merger would create a spectrum behemoth with holdings ranging from T-Mobile’s low band 600 MHz for building penetration and rural coverage all the way through Sprint’s 2.5 GHz for capacity and speed. On Sunday, executives announced they have no intention of divesting any spectrum. However, questions remain on issues like what does a company that already possesses 600 MHz and 700 MHz LTE spectrum do with 800 MHz? How do T-Mobile and Sprint independently spend CapEx this year without diminishing merger synergies? We at S4GRU plan on potentially analyzing a combined company’s significant aggregate spectrum situation in a separate article at a later date. According to the investor information provided, the combined company is estimated to have run rate cost synergies in excess of $6 billion annually or on a net present value basis in excess of $43 billion. $26 billion NPV or $4 billion annually of these annual savings would be derived from network consolidation and CapEx synergies. Additional savings could come from consolidation of operations including store closing and eliminating corporate redundancies. From Sprint’s perspective these savings would be significant. The carrier has not turned a profit in the past 10 years. However, with these savings (even a portion of these savings) the carrier hypothetically would have been profitable all 10 years. Regulatory Hurdles This merger is not a done deal by any means. It faces regulatory scrutiny from the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Under the administration of former President Barack Obama, AT&T and T-Mobile attempted to merge only to be shot down by the government. Sprint and T-Mobile were reportedly told not to even try four years ago. The prior administration's thinking had constantly been that by allowing any combination of the big 4 U.S. wireless carriers to merge into three, consolidation would negatively impact the average consumer due to lower competition in the market. On the conference call Marcelo Claure noted that regulatory approval is “the elephant in the room.” Claure and Legere are expected to embark on a tour of Washington D.C. to try and gain favor for the merger later this week. Much has changed in Washington since Sprint and T-Mobile’s last attempt at a tie-up, but whether or not a merger is anywhere close to a guarantee to pass remains in limbo. President Donald Trump has positioned himself as a pro-business President, meeting with Masa Son shortly after his election. And while Trump’s FCC chairman Ajit Pai has made comments signaling he may be more open to market consolidation than his predecessors; President Trump’s DOJ is simultaneously attempting to block AT&T’s acquisition of Time Warner. Claure and Legere noted that they had talked to Pai, but had yet to talk to anyone at the DOJ prior to announcing the merger. The Sell With nothing guaranteed, selling this merger to the government and the public is going to be the key factor on whether or not it ultimately gets approved. Sprint and T-Mobile executives wasted no time in starting on Sunday launching the pro merger site allfor5g.com. Legere and Claure continued touting the merger in a series of interviews and television appearances Sunday night and Monday morning. Based on early results, the argument for the merger is fairly crafted towards its intended audience. The crux of T-Mobile and Sprint’s contention is that 5G is the future, and the future is costly. Both companies maintain a 3rd stronger carrier is better than 4 carriers in a market, two of which are at a capital disadvantage. Claure noted that, “It’s a very simple rule of business---both companies need each other.” Sprint has 2.5 GHz spectrum that will be optimal for 5G but lacks the financial resources to deploy its own. A new T-Mobile benefits from the 2.5 GHz spectrum, a larger combined customer base, financial synergies, and greater economies of scale to effectively deploy 5G. Legere noted their goal to eventually be able to provide 450 Mbit/s speeds consistently everywhere. The 5G argument is significant for a couple of reasons. The first is the current administration has made 5G a quasi-national security issue. The merger of Qualcomm and Broadcom was blocked partially on the grounds of China taking the lead in 5G, and it was widely reported at one point that the Trump administration was considering nationalizing 5G out of security concerns with China. The goal here is that if you let New T-Mobile happen they contend that they will be in a position to deliver 5G rapidly, creating a sense of urgency that a deal needs to be approved sooner than later. If you don’t let them combine they aren’t in the same position to make that happen. They also contended that 5G would allow for the innovators of the future, a not so thinly veiled overall economic development message. The other major 5G argument centers on rural expansion. For a long-time wireless rural cell service and rural broadband have been an important political and economic development issue. Historically rural service has lagged as the infrastructure cost to deliver service far exceeds any revenue operators can hope to recoup. Legere and Claure have immediately been pushing the notion that a merger would allow the combined carrier to bring rural broadband across the nation (as well as creating jobs in rural areas during the network deployment). Lastly, their final argument centers around job creation. Typically, one of the reasons companies merge is that you can save money by eliminating duplicate positions within two separate organizations. Legere on Sunday claimed that this merger would create “thousands of American jobs” with 200,000 people working either directly for or on behalf of a combined entity. This likely faces more regulatory scrutiny than some of the other pro-merger arguments, as again typically mergers result in overall contraction. Furthermore, Sprint on its own announced several hundred layoffs within the past few months. Why now? In the near term, the FCC at some point soon is going to impose a quiet period forbidding anyone that is participating in this fall’s spectrum auction (an auction Sprint and T-Mobile are seeking a waiver for to jointly coordinate bidding strategies) from discussing mergers. Additionally, the longer the wait is, it is likely some of the merger synergies would be eliminated. Sprint towers that are redundant to T-Mobile are not to Sprint itself. If Sprint's executive team was to be believed, Sprint was poised to spend $5 to 6 billion on Capex each of the next three years. Undoubtedly some of that, a potentially significant portion, would've been on towers T-Mobile has no interest in retaining. Slightly longer term, if there was ever a presidential administration to try this under it is this one. Much like this merger's outcome President Trump's re-election is far from a certainty. If a Democratic administration were to come back to Washington D.C. odds of any merger approval diminish significantly. Longer term yet, Sprint hasn’t turned a profit in 10 years. Marcelo Claure has done a more than admirable job at steering the ship during his four-year tenure: cutting costs, coming up with creative cost-effective network deployment strategies, etc. However, at some point access to traditional borrowing markets may have been cutoff due to Sprint's inability to generate a profit or even consistent free cash flows. It didn’t appear imminent given their two-time borrowing this year, but the company has over $27 billion in debt due over the next 6 years. It is pretty easy to envision a scenario where bond investors said times up. Beyond that, the simple burden of debt may have become so overwhelming that even if it didn't threaten the going concern of the company, it negatively impacted capital expenditures, something we've seen recently. Long-term is actually the story of the past 5+ years. Sprint has incredible spectrum assets, but it needed someone more financially able and willing to deploy them. SoftBank through either inability to act due to debt covenants with Japanese banks lending it money or through deliberate choice—in hindsight was never the savior it seemed. On paper, this merger should seemingly create a financially healthy company that finally is able to leverage Sprint's vast spectrum assets. However, as in the past, time will tell... Source: 5gforall- https://allfor5g.com/
  11. With Todays announcement that T-Mobile and Sprint are merging, and the announcement of the T-Mobile Sprint Roaming deal that will survive and will last for four years regardless if the merger is completed or not, which is effect immediately as stated in the conference call and the slides made available. So I thought I'd create this to see if anyone has been able to use their Sprint device on T-Mobile roaming yet. And of course if not, once you do, come back here and say you have. Personally I'm not bothering with anything until after the coverage map is updated again, hopefully to reflect the T-Mobile roaming. And of course if you are able to roam onto T-Mobile what kind of speeds are you pulling, and on what device. Also for those that are unaware, the T-Mobile Sprint Roaming agreement that was announced as part of todays merger announcement is a roaming agreement for Sprint customers to roam onto T-Mobile for 4 years and takes affect immediately, yes right now, regardless if the merger completes or not. Surely it's a stepping stone to integrating the networks by getting Sprint devices that are capable, which according to the conference call is 20 Million Sprint devices ready to be used on the T-Mobile network full time once deal is approved by the regulators and finally completed.
  12. Tim YuSprint 4G Rollout UpdatesSaturday, April 7, 2018 - 6:54 PM PDT A year ago Sprint and Open Mobile announced the beginnings of a joint venture whereby they would combine their network assets and operations together to create a better more competitive alternative on the island. In late 2017, the deal was consummated which gave Sprint access to Open Mobile's spectrum holdings in the PCS 1900 range and, more importantly, the 750 MHz Band 13 block. This LTE Band 13 is almost exclusively used by Verizon Wireless as the basis for their LTE network. In comparison to Sprints SMR 800 MHz holdings it is 20 MHz in width meaning that Sprint is able to utilize a 10x10 MHz lowband LTE carrier whereas Sprints Band 26 800 MHz is limited to 5x5, 3x3, or even non existence as in Puerto Rico due to spectrum hoarders and other issues pertaining to the IBEZ. With this spectrum, Sprint is now able and has begun the deployment of a triband 750 / 1900 / 2500 network in Puerto Rico! See the following screenshots from S4GRU PR / VI market thread users! Note: UARFCN 5230 is 751 / 782 MHz center frequency. LTE Band 13 runs 777 - 787 / 746 - 756 which means it's smack dab in the center perfect for a 10x10 MHz FDD LTE carrier. Thanks to imatute and smooth25 for the finds!
  13. Hey guys I found another newsletter about Sprint and Cox. I'll be posting the article here. http://www.kansascity.com/news/business/technology/article195339874.html
  14. hello everyone i m starting a thread for sprint network predictions for 2018. i am wishing sprint and s4gru a happy holidays and new years. regards Daniel
  15. The 850 MHz LTE Sprint network is so congested in De Soto MO. I also have proof on my SDR Radio. My SDR Radio can only show 1.920 MHz of the 5 MHz wide LTE Signal.
  16. hey guys i am due for a upgrade today....i am curious on the opinions of others of what phone is a great phone... any opinions are welcome !
  17. hey guys i m curious what you guys think about rooting phones and the positives and negatives about it.... let the discussion begin!
  18. Found this a bit after the major Motorola FCC certification. FCC ID: IHDT56QG6 LTE Bands: 2/4/5/12/17/25/26/41 CDMA BC: 0/1/10 GSM: 850/1900 WCDMA Bands: 2/4/5 5.6 inches x 2.83 inches Category 4 UE no carrier aggregation Rumors have it that the Moto G 2015 and Moto X 2015 will be launched at the same time.... and now we have two distinct Motorola certifications of devices for Sprint with one being high end Cat 6 UE and one being a lower end Cat 4 UE... Hmm..
  19. I'm here looking for answers to a simple question. Where is this mystery Sprint signal coming from? For the past few weeks I've received a signal on multiple Sprint devices, two Sprint devices with roaming turned off, and two Virgin Mobile phones and Virgin Mobile phones can't roam, the other rate plans might be able but I'm talk about Virgin Mobile devices from before they introduced all those other plans. What I'm making clear is these devices have to be picking up a Sprint signal, plus I've downloaded the SignalCheck Pro app which has indicated two different signals 1XRTT and 1X800. The signal only last for about 8 hours each morning and begins coming in and out towards the end of each morning. I try making a call and it fails, and it doesn't get any data at all. I try each device and they all do the same thing they have a signal and very strong signal with no data, and voice doesn't go threw, I haven't tried sending a text figured no data, no voice then there must be no text. I read about some "projects" that Sprint has going on Project Ocean and Project Cedar. Since Project Ocean is suppose to be taking place in Missouri and I live so close to the Iowa, Missouri line, I figured if there is a tower going up maybe it is possible I'm getting a signal from it, in the early stages. I really don't know what is going on, if Sprint is launching service, putting up new towers and that signal finally comes, and stays, and works. I'll be back full time on the Sprint ban wagon. Unfortunately, I live in an area not served by (according to experience and coverage map) Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint. Not even the two Iowa carriers i Wireless or Chat Mobility serve my area, go 10, 15 or 20 miles in any direction your good, here, wireless dead zone, no choice of carriers. And if Sprint puts a tower here if I finally get an answer and learn that signal will soon come and stay and work I'll finally have a choice. So if anyone has any ideas, has experienced this in other parts of the country or has any idea what could be going on please say. Any information is better than not knowing, and together maybe this will be answered.
  20. I'm sure everyone remembers the free night and weekend minutes we had years ago. This morning I was thinking what if a carrier took that same idea but instead made for it data. I think that if a carrier was able to implement this that it would be big and a game changer. What do you guys think?
  21. Had not seen a thread for this yet, I see some definite consumer advantages with Sprint's Network combined with TMob and Wi-fi. I have had many Nexus devices and I love my Nexus 6, although it is a bit big. The price is good for the service. ($20 / unl talk/txt, $10/gb) I hope the technical aspects work as they propose. I am a Google Voice Number user and love the "Any device" call capability and use it on my Tablet, Chromebook and phone. I rarely actually answer my Phone at the house. Answer the tablet or Chromebook..... I love Sprint's network, the upgrades they are putting forth and this Site, but if Project Fi works as advertised, it might lure me to sign on..... What are everyone's thoughts?
  22. Hi, (To moderators) Please move this thread if you think it fits better in another category. Thanks. So I noticed Sprint recently deployed B25 at the tower near(ish) my house (located in Northern Virginia). I'm picking up B25 intermittently on the top level and outside. Even without B25, I am satisfied with the quality of service in my area. The one thing I wish Sprint could do is stay more up to date with the new BlackBerry phones. I like my Q10 but am bummed they never released the Z10 or Z30. There has been a tweet or two from Mr. Claure hinting there may be a new Sprint-BlackBerry release coming. This could be referring to the Classic or upcoming Leap, but it's anyone's guess at this point. Sprint has been pretty cautious in recent years about releasing BlackBerry phones. I'm not sure if that is going to continue now and into the future. T-Mobile is in talks with BlackBerry about selling their phones again. Even without this, there is the ability to bring an unlocked phone to TMO because they are a GSM carrier. So, I bought a used Z10 off of eBay last night. I'm going to purchase a prepaid plan and try the service for a month. But, I'm expecting TMO's service to be satisfactory as well.. I have a tablet that can connect to TMO's network and the service is pretty good overall. What should I do? In your opinion, is there advantage to one carrier or the other? I'm going to also post this on CrackBerry. Perhaps this post would be somewhat more relevant there. Thanks, Mark
  23. So i figured out that Target in my local area uses Sprint for public wifi, and even possibly for its devices connection to Minneapolis. How common is this to see? Its obviously it is wimax due to higher pings 75-100 usually, and speeds 2-6mbps. And what will happen once wimax shuts off?
  24. Try to make this as short and simple as possible. I have three devices; 2 of which are on the same plan and the third on a separate plan. The third device is my tab 4 which is picking up SprintB41 site 310120 just great. I get 3 bars downstairs. My other two devices; Galaxy Note 4 & Galaxy Note Edge for some reason will not pick up this tower. I have tried PRL updates, Profile updates, restarted the phones and all I can get them to connect to is a ClearwireB41 site. More background info...all devices have same Sim card as when purchased, tablet stays off 3/4 of the day and my phones are on when I wake up and turn them off at night. No matter where I go inside or out my phones won't connect to the Sprint site. Anybody have any ideas before I call Sprint trying to figure something out? I'm not sure how long the tablet has been able to connect to this site so I'm not sure what to think of it besides agitated that the tablet of all things is connecting. I posted two photos; one of the tablet connected to the Sprint site; second of the Clear wire site my phones connect to. Thanks in advance.
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