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lilotimz

S4GRU Staff
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Everything posted by lilotimz

  1. Hello everyone! It is the belief of myself and of the staff that it is time to reopen a new T-mobile LTE and Network discussion thread due to the implementation of "network prioritization" that tmobile is doing to its subscribers. As Sprint has similar language in its TOS, we believe that it is worthy of being discussed here as Sprint may do something similar on a site by site basis. This thread will be strictly for discussing T-mobiles LTE network and technologies and not about personalities, their followers, and etc etc which may be better suited for S4GRUs sister site for T-mobile T4GRU. As a result this thread will be heavily moderated to stay on topic but I view the S4GRU member base very favorably and trust that we won't have much problems here.
  2. Yes. They're beginning to receive them.
  3. The thing many of you all seem to be missing is that previously any Sprint signal would immediately override any roaming partner signal. I'm pretty sure many of you that experienced this also experienced in the past where a crappy Sprint CDMA 1x signal that's basically unusable would constantly kick you off a usable partner network. Sprint changing over to a setup where partner LTE networks would still be in use where Sprint still has a 1x/EVDO signal is in general a good thing for LTE on network time and for sanity checks as devices would not constantly hop between good roaming and terrible native connections .
  4. 1.4 MHz LTE + 1.25 MHz CDMA 1x voice will work within a 3x3 block. Don't think any Sprint equipment are tested for a 1.4 MHz bandwidth though...
  5. 16 port tribands are being used in many site deployments as Sprint has overstocked on them (kinda) as 2.5 deployments transitions from LTE 8T8R 2.5 radios to M-MIMO units. In many Samsung Clear conversions they're using 16 port tribands as is with 1.9 RRH P4 and 800 C4s paired with a 2.5 M-MIMO antenna. The 2.5 portions of the triband antennas will be unused. Eventually they'll use the 8 port dual band antennas as they get through the inventory of 16 ports.
  6. Nokia 2.5 AAHC Massive MIMO Antenna Credit: Sprint Credit: nexgencpu
  7. lilotimz

    Official Magic Box discussion thread

    You folks should probably take the discussion of how MB fits into the T-mobile network into that appropriate thread instead of this one.
  8. VoLTE will be a market specific opt in option. It's already live on the network for closed testing and in some areas production network testing.
  9. lilotimz

    Official Magic Box discussion thread

    http://s4gru.com/forums/topic/7711-official-magic-box-discussion-thread/?do=findComment&comment=529863 I have a good lead on what the Relay module will be but will not state anything until further confirmations. No. Airspan is strictly a LTE RAN and future NR RAN provider. Voice will be supported when opt in VoLTE becomes available this coming fall.
  10. Samsung 2.5 MMU MT02P (source: Samsung) (source: FCC OET)
  11. Any and all 31/32/33 39/3A/3B endings are Nokia Mini Macros on Macros typically found on former Clearwire sites. Each mini macro is a stand alone BTS so will have unique GCI identifiers. For old Samsung GCI endings... B25 #1 = 00/01/02 B25 #2 = 03/04/05 B25 #2 10x10 = 06/07/08 B26 = 10/11/0F B41 #1 = 00/01/002 B41 #2 = 03/04/05 B41 #3 = 06/07/08 B41 #4 = 0C/0D/0E B41 Triband Antenna #2 = 09/0A/0B B41 Triband Antenna #3 = 03/04/05 Airspan Airunity MBGCI endings are all over the place but it's easy to pick out once you know the standard GCI heading. Airspan airharmony mini macros GCI ends 01.
  12. lilotimz

    Official Magic Box discussion thread

    http://s4gru.com/entry/431-psa-4th-iteration-gen-3-magic-box-incoming/
  13. That appears to be similar to Samsung and I assume Nokia and ALU regions when 3CA was beginning to roll out. It turned out there was still backend upgrades that needed to be done.
  14. Center frequency 1939.4 MHz so upper part of A block. The entirety of the PCS A block 1930-1945 is owned by Sprint. Shown on the interactive maps..
  15. The backhaul is connected to the SFP backhaul ports so that's fiber! (left 2 = ethernet 802.3AT, right 2 = SFP)
  16. lilotimz

    Mobilitie Sites

    Hehe! Free year BYOD time!
  17. lilotimz

    Mobilitie Sites

    Relays can be used temporarily to bring up sites immediately while dedicated traditional landlines are delivered. In fact, it's one of the touted benefits of the technology. Sprint small cells don't need to wait weeks to months for backhaul to arrive like back during NV days. Also yes. That's an Airharmony 4000 B41 mini macro connected on its ethernet backhaul port to a provider of some sort. Actually now that I think of it, you're the first one to confirm with pictures an AIrspan small cell connected to what appears to be a landline backhaul. Were you able to grab any cell info from it like carriers live or EARFCN?
  18. lilotimz

    Official Magic Box discussion thread

    It may get better over time as it self optimizes but the increase in ping is to expected as I explained previously due to the additional hop as a result of the UE relay action. I typically get 30-40 ms on the macro network and 60-70 ms on the MB and relay fed small cells. Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
  19. lilotimz

    Official Magic Box discussion thread

    With regards to slower data speeds, aim the back of the unit towards the 2.5 cell site you know works well. It sounds like you've accidentally aimed it at a slower site. The UE Relay antennas are extremely directional.
  20. lilotimz

    Official Magic Box discussion thread

    Have you read anything about it or generally about LTE UE Relay in particular? A Magic Box, and most relay fed small cells adds a hop due to the fact it has to convert the connection from an LTE donor signal into a data ethernet connection for the small cell unit as a backhaul. As a result, latency is added which is usually twice that of the donor. Not sure why you're disparaging the MB like you did when it's working as described...
  21. Sooo... found one of the first live small cell in Sacramento. Yay.
  22. by Tim Yu and Andrew J. Shepherd Sprint 4G Rollout Updates Sunday, December 6, 2015 - 2:55 AM MST S4GRU staff is burning the well past midnight oil for our readers. Overnight, Sprint has unofficially updated its network coverage map tool to include LTE Roaming+ and LTE Roaming acquired via its participation in the Competitive Carriers Association (CCA) Roaming Hub and its own Rural Roaming Preferred Partners (RRPP) program. The coverage tool LTE roaming update clearly is a work in progress -- more on that later. But LTE roaming is finally here. So, what is the difference between LTE Roaming+ and LTE Roaming? LTE Roaming+ A simple explanation is that LTE Roaming+ is pseudo native coverage. Sprint users will access certain other LTE networks without roaming restrictions and can treat them as native. Usage does not count against any roaming cap, the only restrictions being the plan type ("unlimited" vs data allotment). LTE Roaming LTE Roaming is non native, off network coverage. Usage is counted against Sprint plan roaming caps. Older plans, such as the Everything Data, have a 300 MB limit, while newer plans, like Framily, are limited to 100 MB. For a specific LTE roaming footprint example, see this coverage tool screenshot centered around Sprint's headquarters in the Kansas City metro. From the LTE roaming legend, the dark green LTE Roaming+ in western Kansas is Nex-Tech Wireless, and you can catch a glimpse of the same LTE Roaming+ from C Spire south of Memphis. The light green is LTE Roaming, all of which appears to be USCC at this point. Elsewhere, you will find LTE Roaming on USCC in its Pacific Northwest, Southeast, and New England regions. There is still map work to do -- note the LTE Roaming legend "@TODO will we have a description here?" More LTE Roaming+ and LTE Roaming operator coverage may be added in the coming hours or days. Device compatibility? Due to Sprint's unique LTE Band 25-26-41 network configuration, not all Sprint LTE capable devices will be able to roam on partner networks, which may use different bands, such as Band 2 (PCS 1900 MHz A-F blocks), Band 4 (AWS-1 1700+2100 MHz), Band 5 (Cellular 850 MHz), and Band 12 (Lower 700 MHz) As such, a CCA/RRPP compatible Sprint triband device, of which many were released in the past year, is the best bet for full network compatibility with partner LTE networks. A CCA/RRPP device will have LTE Band 2-4-5-12-25-26-41 support, which basically covers all of the standard LTE bands in use in the US -- minus VZW Band 13 and AT&T Band 17. No matter, VZW and AT&T presently are not LTE roaming partners with Sprint. If Multi Frequency Band Indicator (MFBI) is active at the network level, a regular Sprint triband device (Bands 25-26-41) may be able to access some partner networks -- due to Band 25 (PCS 1900 MHz A-G blocks) and Band 26 (eSMR 800 MHz + Cellular 850 MHz) being supersets of Band 2 and Band 5, respectively. However, these triband devices will not roam if the partner network uses Band 4 or Band 12. An older single band Sprint LTE Band 25 device will be even more restricted. If it can roam at all, it will be limited to partner networks that use Band 2, again assuming MFBI. In Summary... A few months ago, Sprint upgraded much off network coverage for most accounts from only CDMA1X to EV-DO. Now, a lot of that same roaming footprint gets elevated a second time to LTE. Sprint LTE, eHRPD/EV-DO, and CDMA1X coverage still will hold highest priority. Whether LTE Roaming+ or LTE Roaming, it will not supersede Sprint eHRPD/EV-DO or CDMA1X signal. But outside of all Sprint native coverage, roaming gets another boost. LTE roam, roam if you want to. Sources: Sprint, S4GRU thread
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