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  1. 24 points
    Josh HillSprint 4G Rollout UpdatesFriday, April 5, 2019 - 3:06 AM PDT Now that VoLTE is actually rolling out on Sprint, it's a good time to dive into what exactly is VoLTE, and how is it different from Calling+ and VoWiFi (Wifi Calling). Background Terms E-UTRA or EUTRA: Stands for Evolved Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) Terrestrial Radio Access. This is the technical name for the actual LTE airlink. QoS: Quality of Service. This is a way of tagging / flagging certain types of traffic to have priority above or below other traffic. When traffic has a QoS tag higher than other traffic, network equipment (the tower, routers, etc) will drop or ignore lower priority traffic to ensure that this traffic goes through instead. The equipment can also be configured to reserve a certain amount of bandwidth to only be used by traffic with a particular QoS tag. For example, if a router has 10 Mbps available, it can allocate 1 Mbps for a certain QoS tag. Normal traffic will only be able to use 9 Mbps, with 1 Mbps reserved for that QoS tag. The number of QoS priorities / tags varies between equipment vendors, but can be in excess of 256 priority levels. QCI: QoS Class Identifier. This is a value that an LTE / E-UTRA session can be assigned that corresponds to a particular QoS tag and specific attributes of that particular QoS queue. For example, it may or may not specify a guaranteed/dedicated bandwidth allocation (GBR). APN: The APN is the name of the gateway on a mobile network. It identifies the packet data network that should be used for that E-UTRA session. IMS: IP Multimedia Subsystem. It is a method for sending SMS over LTE, along with setting up VoLTE calls and other signaling. eCSFB: Circuit Switched Fall Back. For phones / UEs that can only listen on either LTE or CDMA rather than both simultaneously, it is a method for the LTE network to tell the device that a call is coming in, and to switch over to CDMA to process it. SRLTE: Single Radio LTE. This is a capability of newer devices that allows them to listen on both CDMA and LTE at the same time, but only transmit on one at a time. This replaces the need for eCSFB, allowing the device to see a call coming in over CDMA while it’s using LTE. It is also more reliable and reduces the number of missed calls due to failed fallback. When a call is active, the LTE session is stopped / paused. SIP: Session Initialization Protocol. This is the standard protocol for VoIP in telecom networks. How VoLTE Works While we typically think of LTE as a single connection, multiple E-UTRA “sessions” can actually be established, creating what are essentially virtual/multiple LTE interfaces, each with their own IP address, QoS level, APN, etc. Each session has a numerical QCI assigned that dictates the actual QoS priority and whether or not it has a GBR (Guaranteed Bitrate). QCI Resource Type QoS Priority Packet Delay Budget Packet Error Loss Rate Example Services 1 GBR 2 100ms 10−2 Conversational Voice 2 GBR 4 150ms 10−3 Conversational Video (Live Streaming) 3 GBR 3 50ms 10−3 Real Time Gaming, V2X messages 4 GBR 5 300ms 10−6 Non-Conversational Video (Buffered Streaming) 65 GBR 0.7 75ms 10−2 Mission Critical user plane Push To Talk voice (e.g., MCPTT) 66 GBR 2 100ms 10−2 Non-Mission-Critical user plane Push To Talk voice 75 GBR 2.5 50ms 10−2 V2X messages 5 non-GBR 1 100ms 10−6 IMS Signalling 6 non-GBR 6 300ms 10−6 Video (Buffered Streaming) TCP-Based (for example, www, email, chat, ftp, p2p and the like) 7 non-GBR 7 100ms 10−3 Voice, Video (Live Streaming), Interactive Gaming 8 non-GBR 8 300ms 10−6 Video (Buffered Streaming) TCP-Based (for example, www, email, chat, ftp, p2p and the like) 9 non-GBR 9 300ms 10−6 Video (Buffered Streaming) TCP-Based (for example, www, email, chat, ftp, p2p and the like). Typically used as default bearer 69 non-GBR 0.5 60ms 10−6 Mission Critical delay sensitive signalling (e.g., MC-PTT signalling) 70 non-GBR 5.5 200ms 10−6 Mission Critical Data (e.g. example services are the same as QCI 6/8/9) 79 non-GBR 6.5 50ms 10−2 V2X messages (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QoS_Class_Identifier) As you can see in the above table, the QCI does not necessarily correspond to the QoS level. For example, QCI 1 has a QoS priority of 2, but QCI 5 has a QoS priority of 1, making it actually higher priority traffic. On Sprint, traditionally one E-UTRA session was used, with a QCI of 9 and QoS priority of 9. This is the lowest QoS priority, and does not have a guaranteed bitrate. On devices which use eCSFB or VoLTE, another E-UTRA session is established for the IMS APN using a QCI of 5 and QoS priority of 1, and is used for IMS. This session also does not have a guaranteed bitrate, but it has the highest QoS priority. IMS is used for SMS over LTE, along with setting up VoLTE calls. eCSFB devices use it for SMS, and likely also for triggering eCSFB. On newer device which instead use SRLTE, IMS is not used unless VoLTE is enabled, and they instead use CDMA 1x for SMS, so an IMS E-UTRA session is often not setup. When a VoLTE call is initiated, a third E-UTRA session is established, also using the IMS APN. This session has a QCI of 1 and QoS priority of 2. Unlike the other two sessions, this one does have a guaranteed bitrate. For Sprint, this bitrate is 39 Kbps. The screenshot below shows all 3 sessions: VoLTE E-UTRA sessions This is how VoLTE calls are prioritized over regular data. Normal data usage, such as loading a web page or watching a video, will still use the lower, default QoS (QCI of 9), while the data for the VoLTE call will be at the second highest priority (QCI 1), just after IMS signaling (QCI 5). The tower / eNB will ensure that the VoIP session always is able to use up to 39 Kbps by reserving that bandwidth and dedicating it to the call. This is in contrast to “Calling+”, which does not establish a separate E-UTRA session, and instead uses the normal QCI 9 session. The below screenshot shows an active Calling+ call. Note the presence of only a single E-UTRA session. Calling+ E-UTRA sessions So now that we have the airlink for VoLTE, what happens? VoLTE, Calling+, and VoWiFi are essentially standard SIP VoIP calls. The below screenshots show the SIP details for an active call, and the LTE Signaling messages that setup and then end the SIP call. VoLTE SIP details VoLTE Signaling For VoLTE, the traffic for the SIP call goes over the QCI 1 E-UTRA session instead of the normal QCI 9 session. This means that the eNB (tower) will reserve and guarantee 39 kbps for the call, but other traffic from the same device will not be prioritized and will use the normal session. So starting a VoLTE call will not make the rest of your traffic prioritized, it will apply only to the VoLTE call. So as a recap, when VoLTE is enabled, the UE / phone establishes multiple E-UTRA sessions. One is used for normal usage, one is used for texting and signaling, and one is used for the VoLTE call. Think of these like separate virtual ethernet cables. On the QoS prioritized and guaranteed bitrate VoLTE session, the UE establishes a SIP VoIP connection for a call. On Calling+ devices, the same SIP connection is used, however it runs over the default QCI 9 session instead, and therefore isn’t prioritized and doesn't have a guaranteed bandwidth. This is why Calling+ calls are more likely to cut out or not sound as good. VoLTE call Calling+ call VoWiFi (Wifi calling) operates almost the same way. Like VoLTE and Calling+, it also uses the same SIP connection for calls and presumably IMS for signaling, but instead of using an LTE E-UTRA session, the phone establishes an IKEv2 IPsec VPN connection to Sprint. This is an encrypted connection that allows data to be tunneled directly into Sprint’s network. The SIP and IMS traffic are then routed over this VPN to Sprint, but not other, normal traffic. From a QoS perspective, VoWiFi is identical to Calling+, in that neither are prioritized above other traffic. VoWiFi call Because VoLTE, Calling+, and VoWiFi all use the same SIP servers and connections, under normal conditions they sound the same and can technically hand off to one another. They can all take advantage of HD Voice codecs and should sound the same, since the call itself is identical across all three. The difference is how the data for that call makes it to Sprint. VoLTE is able to use a dedicated, guaranteed airlink to ensure that congestion on the network (LTE or WiFi) won’t adversely affect the call. One final performance benefit is that VoLTE is able to take advantage of something called RoHC (Robust Header Compression), seen in the above 3 screenshots. This compresses the IP, TCP, UDP, and RTP headers from 60 bytes to 1-3 bytes, resulting in up to 60% bandwidth savings. It’s only possible on a dedicated link, which is why VoLTE has it but Calling+ and VoWiFi do not. So not only does VoLTE have guaranteed, dedicated bandwidth, it will use potentially half as much, which matters a lot for maintaining the call in edge of cell scenarios.
  2. 19 points
  3. 17 points
  4. 15 points
    Sprint's situation is not dire. They still have over 50 million postpaid customers. There is a relatively high churn rate, but people are not fleeing for the exits. Most of that were temporary customers they tried to entice away with promos. In virtually every metric, Sprint is in better shape now. Financially and network performance. And frankly, their current and future capex plans are more realistic and better serving. They are much more in line with what Tmo did to get itself out of its rut back in 2012-2014. Focus on urban markets first, then suburban and secondary markets. And if you play your cards right and growth starts to occur after a few years of doing that, then they can make an exurban/rural move with major highway expansions. But Sprint cannot put the cart before the horse again this time. This is a much smarter plan. We all want Sprint to be the hard charging Number Four carrier that quickly surpasses the others to become #1 or #2. But also, there are ways to be a successful company and stay #4 forever. If Sprint cannot merge, it is still completely viable to run on its own. But it will be a long process to gain more customers or move up the rung. And I think most of us believe the network experience will be the best way to do that. And Sprint needs to start with the highest concentrations of customers first, to get the most bang for its buck. But Sprint is highlighting the darkness in their current status, because it is trying to get a merger approved. And that's going to give a lot of fodder to the unbelievers. Shun the unbelievers! Robert
  5. 14 points
    You guys are just falling for the propaganda. They all want us to think the Sprint's failure is imminent, if not even immediate, if the merger is not approved. You guys all mocked Sprint when they first were using hyperbole about their network and prospects when they played that card initially. And now going all ga-ga over the data again as if it was new info and now means even something more or different. This is all OLD NEWS. They want it rehashed and all of you to freak out and over talk about it, so general opinion is that Sprint is going to no longer exist with or without Tmo. But the reality is, as Brad mentioned above, Sprint is in better shape than it was last year, two years ago and five years ago. And also, I don't get the comment that "Softbank is looking for a bailout by any means necessary." Softbank is not looking for a bailout. No request of government giving money to save Sprint financially. That's a bailout. Softbank is looking for a BUYER. It's totally legit to look to sell the company. Why would this be surprising? Masa was discussing selling Sprint within weeks of buying it. That's always been on the table. And frankly, I wouldn't mind for someone to take over than Masa. A tie up with a cable company may be a very good thing for Sprint if the Tmo deal doesn't happen. But I fully expect a legal challenge if not approved. Robert
  6. 14 points
    Let's be careful with the political commentary. Please stay within the rules https://s4gru.com/forums/topic/1197-s4gru-posting-guidelines-aka-the-rulez/ Robert
  7. 14 points
    Excited when you see your neighbor with a MB on their window ?
  8. 14 points
    This tower has to be 4x4 mimo. Its speeds are too consistent. 250-320 mbps at all times. Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
  9. 13 points
    Tim YuSprint 4G Rollout UpdatesWednesday, September 12, 2018 - 12:45 PM PDT [Edit] It has come to the attention of S4GRU that the Magic Box also supports CDMA Voice Today, Sprint announced the newest Magic Box™ to the world. This Magic Box was first spotted in early summer and S4GRU did a quick write up on it here. Today's announcement formally revealed what new technologies this 3rd Generation public release will give to us. The highlights: This is some huge stuff here especially for technology nerds! Previous Magic Box's only utilized LTE UE Relay for backhaul up to 2 carrier aggregation at 2x2 MIMO at 64 QAM modulation. With 3 CA, 256 QAM, and 4x4 MIMO, this new Magic Box has the same capability as a Gigabit Class device on the Sprint™ network! In addition the notes about Wi-FI connection working for backhaul are huge. Sprint Band 25 or Band 41 may not reach indoors or even in some neighborhoods due to macro coverage patterns even though a Magic Box is available to use in a region. By having the option to use locally supplied internet via WiFi as backhaul, this allows Magic Boxes to enter locations where LTE UE Relay does not work. In addition, the ethernet port tidbit may also be a hint that using ethernet backhaul could also be an option. If so, this Magic Box would potentially support 3 choices of backhaul all in one unit; LTE UE Relay, WiFi, and Ethernet! Wow! With the coming arrival of VoLTE opt in in the near future, LTE coverage indoors is a huge concern. The now expanded reach of this new Magic Box into places previously unreachable is a huge step forward. Exciting! Sprint and Airspan sure loves Magic!
  10. 13 points
    NEWSFLASH! Sprint's subscriber numbers are not going to go up while in merger limbo. Very few want to make a commitment of a new carrier if there are going to be major changes coming that are still undefined. How long have we been sitting here in limbo? It will get worse as this drags on. We cannot sit back and pretend like a merger isn't hanging over Sprint's head and then try to claim Sprint's network plan the last 18 months is the problem. Sprint's network is better (in most places) than it was this past summer, in the last year, two years, five years and since NV was first announced. We should be more talking about the decisions Sprint/Masa/Marcelo have made on being hell bent on a merger since 2015, and then the subsequent actual attempted merger being undertaken and those affects. If anything. I gotta tell you, I have done a lot of travelling since June. Sprint data performance is competitive. It had no more bad sites than T-Mobile or AT&T in my travels. And there are complete cities/regions where the competition is worse. Like here in Western Washington. Sprint is actually very good here. The difference between Sprint and the others with everyday data performance is less disparate now than it ever has been since 2010. And soon it won't matter, anyway. I'm with Trip, though. I would like to see a honest to goodness post mortem evaluation. I'd buy that tell all book, but not the one written by Craig Moffett. I still believe that Sprint can find a way to compete if the T-Mobile deal falls through. And part of that would be to focus on, dare I say it, providing 5G wireless ISP services to unconnected last mile customers. Preferably with DISH. And then focusing on suburban/exurban areas with one ISP choice. Offering triple play, wireless/internet/TV. But again, all this will not matter soon. I think the Sprint merger is all but assured. Robert
  11. 13 points
    Typically with a band around their wrist [emoji12][emoji851][emoji56] Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  12. 12 points
    Sprint has over 56 million customers, do we need to really go down this rabbit hole?! Is Sprint perfect? Nope, is any carrier perfect!? Nope. You should go with what works for you, if Sprint was somehow not meeting my needs, I would have moved on a long time ago. I'm not with them to save a buck, I'm still with them because the network meets my needs (and I consider myself a pretty heavy data user) and customer support has always taken care of any/all my issues. As a plus, I personally enjoy the community Robert and gang have created here, which has been extremely educational and enjoyable.
  13. 12 points
  14. 12 points
    Tim YuSprint 4G Rollout UpdatesThursday, August 2, 2018 - 12:01 PM PDT It's been a long time coming for Sprint through many trials and tribulations. Now it's finally here! S4GRU was able to obtain confirmations that Sprint is finally ready and prepared to enable Voice over LTE (VoLTE) for subscribers to manually opt into in select markets across the country this coming September. See list at the bottom. As a refresher here are some of the essential points about VoLTE applicable to Sprint: Calls placed over VoLTE will have the QOS tag unlike the current Calling Plus configuration on numerous Sprint devices Like Calling Plus, VoLTE will have no fallback to the legacy 1x voice network. Calls will drop if the LTE signal drops. The voice codec is AMR-WB which one can experience with Calling Plus calls and matches the other carriers VoLTE setups. At this point and time S4GRU does not have a list of compatible VoLTE devices though we do speculate that any device currently running Calling Plus should be able to tap into that very same IMS core Calling Plus utilizes via true VoLTE. In addition, recent Apple iPhone's seems like a sure bet as some users have already experienced VoLTE in live field tests conducted by Sprint. For the non Sprint branded BYOD devices like Google Pixels or unlocked Moto devices the future is quite murky indeed. Sprint VoLTE Soft Launch Market Map See this for map of all Sprint market boundaries Sprint VoLTE Soft Launch Markets .tg {border-collapse:collapse;border-spacing:0;} .tg td{font-family:Arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;padding:10px 5px;border-style:solid;border-width:1px;overflow:hidden;word-break:normal;border-color:black;} .tg th{font-family:Arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;font-weight:normal;padding:10px 5px;border-style:solid;border-width:1px;overflow:hidden;word-break:normal;border-color:black;} .tg .tg-wk8r{background-color:#ffffff;border-color:#ffffff;text-align:center;vertical-align:top} Atlanta / Athens Austin Baltimore Boston Central Jersey Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Colorado Columbus DFW East Kentucky East Michigan Ft. Wayne / South Bend Houston Idaho Indianapolis Kansas LA Metro Las Vegas Long Island Miami / West Palm Milwaukee Minnesota Missouri Nashville New York City Norfolk North Wisconsin Northern Jersey Oklahoma Oregon / SW Washington Orlando Philadelphia Metro Phoenix Pittsburgh Richmond San Antonio SF Bay South Bay South Texas Southern Jersey Tampa Toledo Upper Central Valley Utah Washington DC West Iowa / Nebraska West Virginia
  15. 12 points
    I recently went on an 8 day cruise from NYC to the Caribbean that stopped in Turks and Caicos, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. My first stop was Grand Turk and there I opted for the free roaming. My S9+ automatically connected to Flow's (Cable & Wireless) LTE network where I received speeds of around 120kbps on average with boosts of up to 150kbps. Something worth noting is that on speed tests, the server prefers to default to Sprint's Miami server as opposed to local servers. Speeds were more than adequate for any amount of web browsing and honestly felt much faster than in reality. It helps that using Chrome will save you data by not loading pictures on certain sites unless you click them. In Puerto Rico, I connected to Band 13 on the way into the port in San Juan but once I was in the city, my phone never left Band 41. While the phone was usable, speeds remained significantly lower than what I've come to expect from 3xCA in the mainland U.S. Data speeds peaked at around 25-30Mbos but on average were in the 5-10 Mbps range even on LTE+. Signal remained strong everywhere though. Finally in the Dominican Republic, I entered in Amber Cover which is in Puerto Plata. My phone latched onto a weak Band 2 LTE signal in the port from Altice (called Orange Dominicana in SignalCheck). I had trouble loading pages though. Once off of the ship and out in the open, I had a much stronger signal which allowed me to browse the internet without a hitch. Because it was the last day of my trip, while at the beach I decided to purchase the 24 hour high speed pass for $5. My speeds went from 120kbps to 65Mbps in less than 5 seconds. In some areas speeds were slower, particularly at the port where it struggled to break 2Mbps. Now, back on the boat my phone is flipping between weak Band 4 LTE and overloaded Band 5 HSPA+ from Claro (called Verizon Dominicana in SignalCheck Pro). Here is the difference in speed from before and after purchasing the high speed pass.
  16. 12 points
  17. 11 points
  18. 11 points
  19. 10 points
    Yes. But we didn't live in a bubble. There were two other vendors. Ericsson was clearly the worst of the three in Network Vision deployment (in some ways they had to do it twice). Also, when it comes to network management, a third party will almost NEVER do as good of a job yourself, because they don't take ownership of the issues the way you would yourself. And so there is not the sense of urgency when an issue or roadblock comes up. And you're much more likely to accept no as an answer. I see it all day long in my line of work. Robert
  20. 10 points
    Tim YuSprint 4G Rollout UpdatesWednesday, October 2, 2018 - 9:00 PM PDT Starting right now, October 3,2018 12:01 AM EST, Samsung Galaxy S8, 8+, and S8 Active users can manually download the firmware to remove Calling Plus from their devices and bring forth the VoLTE Opt-In toggle. Oh yeah. VoLTE is live on the Sprint Network™ as part of the VoLTE Soft Launch in the select markets. The roll out to the soft launch markets will be gradual over the next weeks. So have at it you folks in the first soft launch markets that are going live! Here are the first 15 initial soft launch markets with more following in the next few weeks. Atlanta-Athens Chicago Dallas-Ft.Worth Houston Indianapolis Kansas Missouri New York City Oregon-West Washington Philadelphia Pittsburgh San Francisco Bay South Bay Southern Jersey Washington DC And if you're in a soft launch market... Source: /u/TheButlershrsmn Discuss Sprint VoLTE on on the forums.
  21. 10 points
    Sorry for being late to this and some of this is repeating New York. They have $7 billion in cash and just under $10 billion in liquid assets. I guess I read that differently than you do. From the investor update presentation they've basically got enough liquidity to pay off their debt for the next two years if they do nothing at all. What will happen is what has happened for years. You'll likely see Sprint offer new notes at some point this year that will replace the debt or expand it further. He isn't talking about a "massive restructuring of their debt" at all. He is talking about what Sprint has done in the past and will continue to do going forward. Sprint has roughly $4.3 billion in debt due this fiscal year. If they issue $4.3 billion in new debt ceteris paribus their debt and liquidity positions haven't changed. They aren't refinancing $40 billion in debt. As maturing debt is retired they are issuing new debt. The next 3 years that is $4 to $5 billion a year at a time. Presumably indefinitely as long as someone is willing to lend to them (which there is a finite point somewhere there), but especially in the current economic conditions Sprint didn't have any trouble getting money last year and actually up-sized an offering due to favorable interest. The Free Cash Flow thing is a little weird. As a customer, I'd prefer Sprint invests in their network, something they did up about 50% year-over-year. That spending is going to drive Free Cash Flow down. If they had spent about $1 billion less in Capex they would've been free cash flow positive, which again is meaningless to me as a customer. It also isn't a really compelling failing firm argument, which is part of the reason they're having trouble convincing the DOJ of their arguement here. T-Mobile hasn't been FCF positive* since 2015. *using Cash from operations less capital expenditures
  22. 10 points
    SignalCheck 4.52 is rolling out to the masses! It should be available on Google Play within the hour. Here are the highlights: New options added: Added option to control display of horizontal signal meters on main screen. Added option to control logging of LTE sites if the TAC is missing/invalid. Added option to display LTE bandwidth on Android 9.0+ devices. This is nice, but not 100% reliable on most devices yet. Hopefully this improves over time. Added options to trigger Alerts based on specific LTE bands or plain-text strings. This is pretty cool.. you can choose LTE bands, and/or have the app alert on any text you want (or don't want, by using the "!" character). Set multiple alerts by separating strings with commas. Notable bug fixes: Resolved issue with app failing to exit immediately in certain scenarios. Resolved issue with missing data on Android Q Beta devices. Resolved issue with missing PLMN ID in certain scenarios. Resolved issue with missing provider database on Android 9.0 devices. Resolved issue with Alerts preferences not working properly on Android 8.0+ devices. Most of the Alert preferences are now handled directly by the system. Resolved issue with missing WCDMA data on newer devices. Some of these items were a lot more work than a brief sentence might hint.. many were significant bugs, some users will see great improvements! Other changes: Adjusted animated action bar tower icon colors when idle. Changed device location settings warning to reappear on every app update. Changed primary signal data source on Android 7.0+ devices. Disabled battery-related options for Location Service and Site Logger on Android 8.0+ devices; intend add back in a future update. Android no longer permits third-party apps to monitor power status changes; I am looking for an alternative method. Improved deployment process; releases will now be smaller, more optimized downloads. This is not a large app, but now it's approximately 30% smaller anyway. Thanks for all of your support! Feel free to shout if you have any questions.. -Mike
  23. 10 points
    Dave YeagerSprint 4G Rollout UpdatesFriday, February 8, 2019 - 8:00 AM PST Sprint’s tribanding project has reached a new phase -- former Clear LTE 2500 only sites are getting new equipment as reported by nowerlater in Cincinnati, Joski1624 in Cleveland, and here in Columbus. Converting sites from LTE 2500 only to triband LTE 800 MHz, LTE 1900 MHz, and LTE 2500 will significantly improve network performance in the traditional metropolitan areas of markets where Clear sites reside. Adding LTE 1900, LTE 800, CDMA 1x1900, and 1x800 will mean stronger signal with improved building penetration that will allow surrounding sites to better serve their more immediate coverage areas. This added site density will be a key factor in performance improvements needed for high quality VoLTE (Voice over LTE) service. Upon completion, site density for the non-LTE 2500 bands will increase an astonishing 57% in Franklin County (Columbus) Ohio. There are currently 162 macro sites not counting factory and private office building sites. There are 93 stand-alone Clear sites. Hamilton County (Cincinnati) will show a 61% increase in site density for the non-LTE 2500 bands. Additional Clear sites lie outside these counties in both markets. The level of increase will vary from market to market. Market wide LTE 1900 performance will improve if this increased site density allows for fewer 1x1900 CDMA carriers per site. This would allow refarming of spectrum to increase the bandwidth for LTE 1900. Minimum LTE bandwidth allowed by many of Sprint’s Remote Radio Units has been increased in recent months according to the FCC. This will be market dependent. There will be a 50% or more LTE 2500 capacity improvement at most Clear sites. Mini Macro Clear sites broadcast only one or two carriers, while most metropolitan areas triband sites broadcast three carriers with up to five carriers at some sites. The tribanded Clear sites go from having Mini Macros to 8T8R remote radio units at most sites, but some sites may retain existing Mini Macros in some markets. With 8T8R, these tribanded Clear sites will also get improved performance and coverage. Samsung Clear equipment used in portions of the south and east often have three carriers thus will primarily gain benefits from the improved coverage of the 8T8Rs. Tribanding the Clear Mini Macro sites will also improve the LTE 2500 performance of surrounding triband sites. If your phone is on the third carrier and you currently drive into an area primarily served by a Clear site your triband site signal will get weaker and weaker until it drops. The LTE 2500 at these existing Triband sites currently carries an extra burden. Permit Foreshadowing Let’s dive further into the details. We have been watching for these site builds for many months. Permits were first seen in the early fall in Columbus, for example: ALTC1800834: ANTENNA UPGRADE TO AN EXISTING CELL SITE OF SPRINT. REMOVE (3) ANTENNAS, (3) MM RRUS, AND (3) 15/64" COAX. INSTALL (3) ANTENNAS, (9) RRHS, (3) 1-1/16" HYBRID CABLES, GC SUPPLIED RET CABLES, (3) OPTIC FIBER JUNCTION CYLINDERS, (3) POWER JUNCTION CYLINDERS, (1) SITEPRO SNP-12NP SECTOR MOUNT AND HANDRAIL KIT. REMOVE EXISTING CLEARWIRE GROUND CABINETS AND INSTALL ALL NEW SPRINT ECAB & ICAB COMBINATION CABINET AND PPC ON NEW CONCRETE PAD. REMOVE ALL POWER AND FIBER CABLING TO RRHS. Permits and drawings were also found in Sacramento by our resident staff Tim (lilotimz), with one site even going from CA to Massive MIMO: The Network Vision plus LTE 2500 using 8T8R LTE 2500, LTE 1900, and Four Port LTE 800,and the much rarer Massive MIMO LTE 2500/5G future, LTE 1900 and Four PORT LTE 800. A big question was whether the sites would have CDMA or just be VoLTE. Most Sprint phones in use today can only use CDMA. OceanDave picked up the first Clear Triband Conversion signal in his logs recorded on 11/30/2018. Joski1624 found and confirmed CDMA 1x1900 and 8T8R LTE 2500 at the site once the logs were analyzed in early January. Here is a screenshot from Joski1624 showing LTE 800 and 1x800 from the same Clear conversion site: Cleveland has confirmed other sites. Nowerlater has reported similar results covering bands 25 and 26 from other Clear sites converted to Triband in the Cincinnati Market Here is a photo of a Columbus Clear site being converted to Triband. You can see that the Clear Band 41(inside red outline) is still wired and was quite functional at the time of the photo. 1) Clear antenna (remove), 2) Mini Macro (remove for most sites), 3) Microwave antenna for redundant backhaul (will likely remain if present). This is becoming a Triband Hexadeacport 16 port Antenna Setup outlined in yellow with 1) 8T8R LTE 2500 Remote Radio Unit, 2) LTE 1900 Remote Radio Unit, 3) LTE 800 four port Remote Radio Unit, 4) 16-Port Triband Antenna. In this next photo you can see the old cabinet on its metal grate and the new cabinet on new concrete. The underground conduit needs to be placed then the concrete poured before you will see cabinets. Some of the sites will have double cabinets (permits say Eltek, but observed cabinets do not match catalog). Note that they are pre-assembled, in this case by Stonecrop Technologies. These sites are also getting new Purcell cable boxes. In Columbus, 86% of the Clear sites have permits. New permits are still being filed. We began finding permits for Clear conversions last October. Permits are active for one year. They can be extended, but typically the work will be done in that time period. It is quite possible the FCC will not approve the merger into T-Mobile until December or later based on the Shentel – nTelos merger. This merger could finish sooner or not at all. If the merger is approved this work would likely stop, but any completed site work would benefit existing Sprint customers during the estimated two to three year transition period (market dependent). If all Clear sites were converted to triband, here is an image of roughly where the sites would strongly benefit in the traditional Columbus metro area: Please note that actual site coverage areas are not circular but are shaped between a three bladed airplane propeller and a three leaf clover. There would be significant variations from the heat map above. Of course Columbus overall has Network Vision and other Next Generation triband sites. These Ohio markets mentioned have active S4GRU signal hunters, thus are likely a proxy for what is happening or will happen in other markets with active former Clear LTE 2500 only sites (for clarity we will now refer to them as Clear sites). Indeed lilotimz has found permits and drawing in Sacramento. Reddit user Marley3456 has confirmed triband Clear sites in Salt Lake City Utah, thus they very likely exist in other parts of the country. The following cities in state order all had more than 10 Clear sites with LTE in 2014 thus are likely prospects for this type of change: If your city is listed above, how will you know if you will benefit? Start looking looking at the Clear sites in your city today and be observant of any changes. Help is available here at S4GRU.com if needed. Online guides can help: Nokia Mini Macros on Macro Sites, Samsung LTE 2500 Remote Radio Units and Antennas. It will be worth knowing if your market will benefit from the significant capacity improvements of the Clear site Triband conversions! Edited 2/8/19 to better cover Samsung Clear Sites.
  24. 10 points
    You both need to stop it and stop it now. Any further arguments between the both of you will result in a time off on the forum. TS out
  25. 10 points
    Yes, hindsight is always 20/20. None of these were completely bad moves in the time they were made, but just ended up in the wrong side of history in retrospect. If Sprint's decisions throughout time have always been wrong, then why are you even here in 2019? Get constructive or get going. Thanks. Robert
  26. 10 points
    A public update to SignalCheck Pro 4.51 is ready! It should be available on Google Play within the next hour or so. There are a few significant changes behind the scenes that are tricky to describe, but the end result will (hopefully) be less (no?) scenarios when the app becomes "stuck" and struggles to display band information until you connect to a new site. Also, Sprint users will see site notes that have been stored with any Sprint-owned PLMN ID, including some of the odd ones popping up lately (312530 most notably). A new icon will indicate when Wi-Fi Calling is active; it appears to be reliable, but there are occasional moments where the OS does not seem to realize it has switched on/off. I will continue working on it. Other pesky bugs were also squashed. The full change log for this release is below: Added additional indicators for AT&T LTE band 14 FirstNet cells. Added icon to indicate when Wi-Fi calling is active. (Pro) Added indicator for Sprint LTE band 41 small cell second carriers. Added indicators for AT&T LTE band 2 small cells. Disabled support for Android 2.3 – Android 3.2. Changed LTE band 14 to display as LTE 750. Changed primary PLMN ID source on Android 7.0+ devices. Implemented Android Oreo notification channels. (Pro) Improved Sprint LTE site notes to appear across multiple PLMN IDs. (Pro) Minor adjustments to animated action bar tower icon. (Pro) Resolved force closes when Background Service is disabled. Resolved issue with app auto-launching regardless of Launch on Device Boot preference setting. (Pro) Resolved issue with cached diagnostic reports not sending. Resolved issue with missing LTE band data when PLMN ID changes. Resolved issue with Show Mobile IP Address failing. (Pro) Resolved issue with some Sprint LTE band 41 cells showing improper MM and SC indicators. Updated PLMN 310580 to Inland Cellular. There are plenty of other improvements still in progress; they will be released as I have time to get them finished, tested, and reliable. I appreciate everyone's support! Thanks, -Mike
  27. 10 points
    https://newsroom.sprint.com/sprint-5g-overview.htm Here's some new info on Sprint's 5G deployment plans: Availability Sprint plans to begin its mobile 5G rollout in the first half of 2019. Its first nine 5G markets include some of the largest cities in the country: Atlanta Chicago Dallas Houston Kansas City Los Angeles New York City Phoenix Washington, D.C. The company’s 5G technology rollout is underway with equipment deployed and currently being tested in multiple cities across the country. Sprint 5G will begin with contiguous footprints in the downtown areas of these first nine cities, allowing for its on-the-go customers to stay connected to 5G through the city center. For example, in LA, Sprint will offer mobile 5G service all the way from Dodgers Stadium to Santa Monica.
  28. 10 points
  29. 10 points
    The trend continues for Sprint and improvmemts on rootmetrics.. more improvements in Oxnard CA , San Jose CA , Hawaii and Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
  30. 9 points
  31. 9 points
    Please demonstrate what consequences AT&T is facing for raising prices twice in the year after their merger, despite representing to regulators that permitting the merger with Time Warner would permit them to lower prices. - Trip
  32. 9 points
    No. A cable company buying out Sprint or T-mobile would be very likely better for the consumer as they'd have an incentive to compete and gain subscribers. It's only the natural path forward if one looks at how Comcast and TWC (Spectrum) is setting up things. They've already began building the infrastructure of supporting wireless users and triple play integration based on their MVNO setup. The next step would fully integrate those wireless users into their entire network top down instead of piggybacking off say Verizon. They can leverage their long haul fiber and last mile hybrid fiber coaxial networks to provide dedicated full speed backhaul to their own cell sites and new ones they can leverage using their own telephone poles and right of ways. It's one of the reasons why Shentel land is so amazing. Full vertical integration.
  33. 9 points
    VoLTE post is up! https://s4gru.com/entry/439-sprints-casting-call-of-voice-over-actors-an-in-depth-analysis-of-volte-calling-and-vowifi/ Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
  34. 9 points
    Tim YuSprint 4G Rollout UpdatesFriday, September 28, 2018 - 8:10 PM PDT In the past few day, Sprint began informing its staff and partners that the VOIP application used for LTE Calling on Sprint devices, Calling Plus, will be starting to be decommissioned beginning with software updates to Android devices on the 29th of September. Sprint updated the Calling Plus FAQ to note this upcoming change to android devices via software updates yet to be rolled out. The following is allegedly what the UI screen will resemble when the devices are updated to remove Calling Plus. Photo Credit: Sean Yes. That's right. Don't avert your eyes! The removal of Calling Plus heralds the arrival of the Opt-In VoLTE toggle. Magic Box Connections Enhanced In addition to the removal Calling Plus, existing Magic Box's have already began and will continue to receive firmware updates that will enable the support of VoLTE in the soft launch regions. This firmware update, currently 15.15.50.514 / 60.7.46.0, also has additional "enhancements" that will improve uplink performance and device handoffs between Magic Box's to and from other Magic Box's or Macro / Micro cells. This is what the screen appears to be when updated. Photo Credits: Jim So with all this work going on it's all on you Galaxy S8 generation users to tell us on your experiences with the the slightly delayed VoLTE soft launch in the coming days!
  35. 9 points
    Just a quick update for the Beta Crew, yes I am still hacking away at the new Alerts.. it is a lot of work trying to get everything working well on Oreo+ devices while not breaking pre-Oreo devices. I forgot how many ugly workarounds I needed to implement to keep everything working before. The new Android notification settings don't mesh well with my needs either, but it will get done. Just a tedious struggle. Side note, I accidentally stumbled across something I either didn't know or forgot about.. Pie introduced a new method to get the channel bandwidth, so hopefully that will be an easy and very cool addition making this wait worth it.. stay tuned.. -Mike
  36. 9 points
    I'm no moderator here officially, but I've served as one on many other sites, both private and commercial/for profit, and just want to underscore for you guys continuing this: both Robert and other mods have warned you, and yet you're continuing the political-based discussion. Just to interject a friendly alternative suggestion before one of them comes in here and acts on that timeout threat - you could just as easily continue these back-and-forth arguments directly via private messaging, which the site supports. It's your choice whether or not to do that, but you can continue as you are, or have that choice forced on you the hard way.
  37. 9 points
  38. 9 points
    Sprint’s first small cell in Northwest Oklahoma City, using Nokia’s 2.5 GHz mini macro. This pole went up in September, and the equipment was added in late October or early this month. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  39. 9 points
    I continue to find Sprint's poor position to be kind of depressing given the natural advantages that Sprint should have. When AT&T deploys more spectrum, for example, they have to send a crew out to touch a site, whether to add a radio or an antenna or both. They're in the midst of rolling out Band 14 which, of course, requires new equipment at the sites, even sites that already have four bands of LTE, many of which appear to have been installed with separate tower touches. With Sprint's Band 41 holdings, as long as Band 41 equipment is in place, adding spectrum should be as simple as changing software settings. As long as the backhaul is fiber, that should be relatively straight-forward to increase as well. Even on PCS, because of the Network Vision upgrades, refarming spectrum should be very cheap and not require much if any additional equipment. For Sprint, adding bandwidth should be significantly less expensive than it is for other carriers, and yet despite that advantage, it is in the position of weakness. I hope that someone writes a book about how Sprint got to this position one day; one of those well-researched and heavily-sourced ones. It would be a fascinating read. - Trip
  40. 9 points
  41. 9 points
    Sprint Gen 3 announced (4th version). http://newsroom.sprint.com/sprint-announces-faster-more-powerful-and-smaller-sprint-magic-box.htm Highlights. Gen 3 can do 3 methods... Relay via 3CA 4x4 MIMO 256/64 QAM, WiFi, and ethernet.
  42. 9 points
    MB went down a couple evenings ago -stuck in reboot loop. Checked here and no one had posted about the outage yet, so I performed a factory reset. Back to the reboot loop. It was up and running when I got up to go to work the next morning and seems to have been working ever since. We live out in the country, found a prefect position for the MB. 3 bars at -112dbm connect. Getting up to 20mbps down and up to 8mbps up on devices. The only internet we can get at our house is 3mb/0.6mb DSL, so we rely on this for our phones/data plans. LTE signal is nonexistent otherwise in the basement, 1 bar lower floor, 2 bars upstairs and 2-3 outside. With MB, it's 5 bars on our entire 2 acre lot.
  43. 9 points
    Got my note 9 yesterday, I'm extremely impressed so far. Battery is outstanding so far.
  44. 9 points
    Oh hello San Diego .... what do we have here... 4x4 MIMO huh! Lets check with the S9+... Weird... Wonder if 3CA is affecting it... (checks pixel 3 CA vs S9+ no CA enabled) Hmm... i wonder what'll happen if I disable 4x4 B41 MIMO on the S9+... vroooooooooooooooooooooooooooooom.
  45. 8 points
    If I were in charge of Sprint and the merger fell through today, here are the changes I would make: Day 1 changes: Drop the L800 Qrxlevmin to -128. I don’t want users falling off L800 at -120 or -122 because: L800 will almost always offer better speeds than CDMA at those signal levels. This will reduce the reconnect time to usable LTE. The pocket 3G problem will be eliminated. VoLTE reliability will skyrocket. Remove the per-site “VoLTE enabled” flag (which by the way is a big part of the reason Sprint is struggling to support older devices) and allow it on all sites and Magic Boxes. This will allow software updates enabling VoLTE to be pushed to ISIM devices in a matter of weeks. Revert L2500 to Config 1 to both increase L2500 upload speeds and effective range. In markets where spectrum allows, split 8T8Rs into two 4T4R transmit chains and run 6 L2500 carriers. Some markets such as Seattle already have this. Short-term changes (within the first 12 months): Contact high-traffic venues (casinos, airports, stadiums, arenas, concert venues, underground train systems, convention centers, etc) and sign onto DAS systems. Begin buildout in high-roaming high-traffic areas such as ski resorts (e.g. Big Sky, MT and Sugarloaf, ME), rural tourist attractions (e.g. Mount Rushmore, SD and Yellowstone National Park) and large cities (e.g. Billings, MT and Chyenne, WY). Identify and begin to close in-city coverage gaps by means of: Implementing a verified coverage map to identify areas without LTE. Allow T-Mobile roaming and possibly even AT&T roaming everywhere and focus on high-roaming in-city areas. Expedite the Massive MIMO rollout to stay at the front of the 5G race. Expedite the tribanding of any remaining single-band/dual-band/non-redundant Clear sites. Look to increase backhaul to high-usage sites. Prioritize interband CA deployment. Prioritize the implementation of dynamic NR UL and move NR to the PCC. Begin talks with Dish to host their 600 and AWS-4 spectrum. This will at least double Sprint’s lowband capacity nationwide and give them greenfield lowband to deploy NR on. Long-term changes (after the first 12 months): Cut EVDO completely ASAP. Run a 1x1900 carrier in L1900 guard bands and maintain the 1x800 carrier. Begin to replace 800 radios with NR/LTE/1x DSS-capable radios. Begin a rural highway buildout in areas where the most T-Mobile and AT&T roaming occurs. The deployment will primarily be lowband. This task is not as daunting as it seems for sites already exist that cover effectively every major highway in the United States. The only thing to do will be to negotiate a reasonable lease. Open up an NR test drive program similar to the one T-Mobile ran for LTE and advertise it heavily.
  46. 8 points
    At the Nationals Game today! My iPhone XS automatically connected to a private WiFi network “provided by Sprint” at Nationals Park. Check out the data speeds here during the game. Nice job Sprint! Here’s the speeds over the WiFi:
  47. 8 points
    This is a non-sequitur. My whole point was that they have the service on paper, but not in reality. If they put 5G-NR on 600 MHz on those same towers that currently have 700 MHz, they can fill a map full of rural areas running "5G" with the actual service being as poor as it is today. (And, if 5G-NR is a more fragile airlink than LTE, then it will be poorer.) Spectrum is not the issue, deployment is. Lose how? Once they've merged, what is the remedy if they decide to give the FCC, DOJ, and the American people the middle finger? I remind you to check out all the remedies that have been used on AT&T so far, such as... ... huh, I can't think of any. - Trip
  48. 8 points
    New beta is finally done brewing and has been uploaded to Google Play.. should be available within the hour! Lots of significant bugfixes and new LTE alerts that should make people very happy. Changelog: https://signalcheck.app/change-log Thanks for your patience, and let me know what I broke.. -Mike
  49. 8 points
  50. 8 points
    How do I give back my old one and get one of these lol?
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