Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/01/2019 in all areas

  1. 27 points
    And what will this all mean for S4GRU? We are in a wait and see mode before we decide how to adapt. Until then, we will be here every day with you all, plotting our wireless destiny. Robert
  2. 24 points
    Josh HillSprint 4G Rollout UpdatesFriday, April 5, 2019 - 3:06 AM PDT Now that VoLTE is actually rolling out on Sprint, it's a good time to dive into what exactly is VoLTE, and how is it different from Calling+ and VoWiFi (Wifi Calling). Background Terms E-UTRA or EUTRA: Stands for Evolved Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) Terrestrial Radio Access. This is the technical name for the actual LTE airlink. QoS: Quality of Service. This is a way of tagging / flagging certain types of traffic to have priority above or below other traffic. When traffic has a QoS tag higher than other traffic, network equipment (the tower, routers, etc) will drop or ignore lower priority traffic to ensure that this traffic goes through instead. The equipment can also be configured to reserve a certain amount of bandwidth to only be used by traffic with a particular QoS tag. For example, if a router has 10 Mbps available, it can allocate 1 Mbps for a certain QoS tag. Normal traffic will only be able to use 9 Mbps, with 1 Mbps reserved for that QoS tag. The number of QoS priorities / tags varies between equipment vendors, but can be in excess of 256 priority levels. QCI: QoS Class Identifier. This is a value that an LTE / E-UTRA session can be assigned that corresponds to a particular QoS tag and specific attributes of that particular QoS queue. For example, it may or may not specify a guaranteed/dedicated bandwidth allocation (GBR). APN: The APN is the name of the gateway on a mobile network. It identifies the packet data network that should be used for that E-UTRA session. IMS: IP Multimedia Subsystem. It is a method for sending SMS over LTE, along with setting up VoLTE calls and other signaling. eCSFB: Circuit Switched Fall Back. For phones / UEs that can only listen on either LTE or CDMA rather than both simultaneously, it is a method for the LTE network to tell the device that a call is coming in, and to switch over to CDMA to process it. SRLTE: Single Radio LTE. This is a capability of newer devices that allows them to listen on both CDMA and LTE at the same time, but only transmit on one at a time. This replaces the need for eCSFB, allowing the device to see a call coming in over CDMA while it’s using LTE. It is also more reliable and reduces the number of missed calls due to failed fallback. When a call is active, the LTE session is stopped / paused. SIP: Session Initialization Protocol. This is the standard protocol for VoIP in telecom networks. How VoLTE Works While we typically think of LTE as a single connection, multiple E-UTRA “sessions” can actually be established, creating what are essentially virtual/multiple LTE interfaces, each with their own IP address, QoS level, APN, etc. Each session has a numerical QCI assigned that dictates the actual QoS priority and whether or not it has a GBR (Guaranteed Bitrate). QCI Resource Type QoS Priority Packet Delay Budget Packet Error Loss Rate Example Services 1 GBR 2 100ms 10−2 Conversational Voice 2 GBR 4 150ms 10−3 Conversational Video (Live Streaming) 3 GBR 3 50ms 10−3 Real Time Gaming, V2X messages 4 GBR 5 300ms 10−6 Non-Conversational Video (Buffered Streaming) 65 GBR 0.7 75ms 10−2 Mission Critical user plane Push To Talk voice (e.g., MCPTT) 66 GBR 2 100ms 10−2 Non-Mission-Critical user plane Push To Talk voice 75 GBR 2.5 50ms 10−2 V2X messages 5 non-GBR 1 100ms 10−6 IMS Signalling 6 non-GBR 6 300ms 10−6 Video (Buffered Streaming) TCP-Based (for example, www, email, chat, ftp, p2p and the like) 7 non-GBR 7 100ms 10−3 Voice, Video (Live Streaming), Interactive Gaming 8 non-GBR 8 300ms 10−6 Video (Buffered Streaming) TCP-Based (for example, www, email, chat, ftp, p2p and the like) 9 non-GBR 9 300ms 10−6 Video (Buffered Streaming) TCP-Based (for example, www, email, chat, ftp, p2p and the like). Typically used as default bearer 69 non-GBR 0.5 60ms 10−6 Mission Critical delay sensitive signalling (e.g., MC-PTT signalling) 70 non-GBR 5.5 200ms 10−6 Mission Critical Data (e.g. example services are the same as QCI 6/8/9) 79 non-GBR 6.5 50ms 10−2 V2X messages (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QoS_Class_Identifier) As you can see in the above table, the QCI does not necessarily correspond to the QoS level. For example, QCI 1 has a QoS priority of 2, but QCI 5 has a QoS priority of 1, making it actually higher priority traffic. On Sprint, traditionally one E-UTRA session was used, with a QCI of 9 and QoS priority of 9. This is the lowest QoS priority, and does not have a guaranteed bitrate. On devices which use eCSFB or VoLTE, another E-UTRA session is established for the IMS APN using a QCI of 5 and QoS priority of 1, and is used for IMS. This session also does not have a guaranteed bitrate, but it has the highest QoS priority. IMS is used for SMS over LTE, along with setting up VoLTE calls. eCSFB devices use it for SMS, and likely also for triggering eCSFB. On newer device which instead use SRLTE, IMS is not used unless VoLTE is enabled, and they instead use CDMA 1x for SMS, so an IMS E-UTRA session is often not setup. When a VoLTE call is initiated, a third E-UTRA session is established, also using the IMS APN. This session has a QCI of 1 and QoS priority of 2. Unlike the other two sessions, this one does have a guaranteed bitrate. For Sprint, this bitrate is 39 Kbps. The screenshot below shows all 3 sessions: VoLTE E-UTRA sessions This is how VoLTE calls are prioritized over regular data. Normal data usage, such as loading a web page or watching a video, will still use the lower, default QoS (QCI of 9), while the data for the VoLTE call will be at the second highest priority (QCI 1), just after IMS signaling (QCI 5). The tower / eNB will ensure that the VoIP session always is able to use up to 39 Kbps by reserving that bandwidth and dedicating it to the call. This is in contrast to “Calling+”, which does not establish a separate E-UTRA session, and instead uses the normal QCI 9 session. The below screenshot shows an active Calling+ call. Note the presence of only a single E-UTRA session. Calling+ E-UTRA sessions So now that we have the airlink for VoLTE, what happens? VoLTE, Calling+, and VoWiFi are essentially standard SIP VoIP calls. The below screenshots show the SIP details for an active call, and the LTE Signaling messages that setup and then end the SIP call. VoLTE SIP details VoLTE Signaling For VoLTE, the traffic for the SIP call goes over the QCI 1 E-UTRA session instead of the normal QCI 9 session. This means that the eNB (tower) will reserve and guarantee 39 kbps for the call, but other traffic from the same device will not be prioritized and will use the normal session. So starting a VoLTE call will not make the rest of your traffic prioritized, it will apply only to the VoLTE call. So as a recap, when VoLTE is enabled, the UE / phone establishes multiple E-UTRA sessions. One is used for normal usage, one is used for texting and signaling, and one is used for the VoLTE call. Think of these like separate virtual ethernet cables. On the QoS prioritized and guaranteed bitrate VoLTE session, the UE establishes a SIP VoIP connection for a call. On Calling+ devices, the same SIP connection is used, however it runs over the default QCI 9 session instead, and therefore isn’t prioritized and doesn't have a guaranteed bandwidth. This is why Calling+ calls are more likely to cut out or not sound as good. VoLTE call Calling+ call VoWiFi (Wifi calling) operates almost the same way. Like VoLTE and Calling+, it also uses the same SIP connection for calls and presumably IMS for signaling, but instead of using an LTE E-UTRA session, the phone establishes an IKEv2 IPsec VPN connection to Sprint. This is an encrypted connection that allows data to be tunneled directly into Sprint’s network. The SIP and IMS traffic are then routed over this VPN to Sprint, but not other, normal traffic. From a QoS perspective, VoWiFi is identical to Calling+, in that neither are prioritized above other traffic. VoWiFi call Because VoLTE, Calling+, and VoWiFi all use the same SIP servers and connections, under normal conditions they sound the same and can technically hand off to one another. They can all take advantage of HD Voice codecs and should sound the same, since the call itself is identical across all three. The difference is how the data for that call makes it to Sprint. VoLTE is able to use a dedicated, guaranteed airlink to ensure that congestion on the network (LTE or WiFi) won’t adversely affect the call. One final performance benefit is that VoLTE is able to take advantage of something called RoHC (Robust Header Compression), seen in the above 3 screenshots. This compresses the IP, TCP, UDP, and RTP headers from 60 bytes to 1-3 bytes, resulting in up to 60% bandwidth savings. It’s only possible on a dedicated link, which is why VoLTE has it but Calling+ and VoWiFi do not. So not only does VoLTE have guaranteed, dedicated bandwidth, it will use potentially half as much, which matters a lot for maintaining the call in edge of cell scenarios.
  3. 15 points
    Sprint's situation is not dire. They still have over 50 million postpaid customers. There is a relatively high churn rate, but people are not fleeing for the exits. Most of that were temporary customers they tried to entice away with promos. In virtually every metric, Sprint is in better shape now. Financially and network performance. And frankly, their current and future capex plans are more realistic and better serving. They are much more in line with what Tmo did to get itself out of its rut back in 2012-2014. Focus on urban markets first, then suburban and secondary markets. And if you play your cards right and growth starts to occur after a few years of doing that, then they can make an exurban/rural move with major highway expansions. But Sprint cannot put the cart before the horse again this time. This is a much smarter plan. We all want Sprint to be the hard charging Number Four carrier that quickly surpasses the others to become #1 or #2. But also, there are ways to be a successful company and stay #4 forever. If Sprint cannot merge, it is still completely viable to run on its own. But it will be a long process to gain more customers or move up the rung. And I think most of us believe the network experience will be the best way to do that. And Sprint needs to start with the highest concentrations of customers first, to get the most bang for its buck. But Sprint is highlighting the darkness in their current status, because it is trying to get a merger approved. And that's going to give a lot of fodder to the unbelievers. Shun the unbelievers! Robert
  4. 14 points
    You guys are just falling for the propaganda. They all want us to think the Sprint's failure is imminent, if not even immediate, if the merger is not approved. You guys all mocked Sprint when they first were using hyperbole about their network and prospects when they played that card initially. And now going all ga-ga over the data again as if it was new info and now means even something more or different. This is all OLD NEWS. They want it rehashed and all of you to freak out and over talk about it, so general opinion is that Sprint is going to no longer exist with or without Tmo. But the reality is, as Brad mentioned above, Sprint is in better shape than it was last year, two years ago and five years ago. And also, I don't get the comment that "Softbank is looking for a bailout by any means necessary." Softbank is not looking for a bailout. No request of government giving money to save Sprint financially. That's a bailout. Softbank is looking for a BUYER. It's totally legit to look to sell the company. Why would this be surprising? Masa was discussing selling Sprint within weeks of buying it. That's always been on the table. And frankly, I wouldn't mind for someone to take over than Masa. A tie up with a cable company may be a very good thing for Sprint if the Tmo deal doesn't happen. But I fully expect a legal challenge if not approved. Robert
  5. 13 points
    I knew this day was coming, and yet it's still a bit heartbreaking now that it's finally here. Sprint had some ups and downs. The most positive thing I can remember against the other three was the old Google voice integration. Largest negative would be the VoLTE rollout. It was a blast going through Wimax, the LTE launch, triband LTE, and then finally 5G NR. Getting to have tower maps through S4GRU was a huge part of the experience. It definitely wouldn't have been the same without this place. A big thanks to everyone at S4GRU over the years, and I hope the transition goes as well as it can for all the current Sprint employees.
  6. 13 points
    Agreed. Verizon is over rated and doesn't serve the hype. Sprint is under rated and doesn't deserve all the trash talk. People pick winners and losers and over claim the positives and negatives of each. They have to have someone to cheer and someone to jeer. If you aren't first, you're nobody. I have a Verizon work phone. It rarely wins in total speed throughput compared to my Sprint and T-Mobile phones (and USCC on Google Fi). Verizon doesn't win in coverage in my area. But it's a pretty consistent experience. And that's good for a lot of people. Let them have Verizon. But Sprint has pulled off nearly a miracle the past few years with little capital infusion, in a highly competitive environment and spending billions still in capex. They just have had to be very deliberate and measured where and how they spent it. Every year since 2011 Sprint was nearly going bankrupt in the eyes of the naysayers. Every year, they would claim this was the year they were going to lose it all. Yet they still have over 54 million customers. They are nowhere near bankrupt, and doing better by most measures. And soon it won't even matter. Because Mr. Legere will be in charge of it all. And Sprint will be a forgotten name. But they were not bought out of bankruptcy sale and were not even close to bankruptcy. Robert
  7. 12 points
    Sprint has over 56 million customers, do we need to really go down this rabbit hole?! Is Sprint perfect? Nope, is any carrier perfect!? Nope. You should go with what works for you, if Sprint was somehow not meeting my needs, I would have moved on a long time ago. I'm not with them to save a buck, I'm still with them because the network meets my needs (and I consider myself a pretty heavy data user) and customer support has always taken care of any/all my issues. As a plus, I personally enjoy the community Robert and gang have created here, which has been extremely educational and enjoyable.
  8. 11 points
    It's been 4-1/2 years, but I am happy to announce we have a new member joining S4GRU Staff. Please join me in welcoming RAvirani in joining the Staff here at S4GRU. Rey has been a key member helping visitors to S4GRU for years. We are grateful to have him join the ranks. It feels like he has been a part of the team for quite some time. Seems fitting and overdue. Thanks Rey for accepting the invitation. You must be a little crazy to agree! Now @RAvirani will have full moderator powers and responsibilities as well. Welcome aboard!Robert
  9. 10 points
    Holy crap, go Nokia: Nokia touted a new lab achievement over Sprint’s 2.5 GHz spectrum that boosted 5G capacity by up to four times through a software upgrade. The test included a software upgrade of E-UTRAN New Radio – Dual Connectivity (EN-DC) and Multi-User-MIMO (MU-MIMO) using Sprint’s mid-band 5G spectrum and Nokia’s AirScale solution to deliver 3 Gbps total downlink cell throughput, in what Nokia called a first. It showcased Nokia’s AirScale Dual Mode Massive MIMO for 5G and LTE, using a single radio unit for both LTE and 5G. The test also tapped commercial hotspot devices. Nokia said once its service is commercially available operators will be able to “vastly increase” network capacity through software updates to the base station, without the need to invest in more spectrum or require site visits to swap out hardware or transport. https://www.fiercewireless.com/5g/nokia-notches-5g-capacity-boost-via-software-upgrade
  10. 10 points
    Seems like Saw will be part of New T-Mobile! https://newtmobile.com/senior-leadership-team/ JOHN SAW EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF ADVANCED AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES
  11. 10 points
    Was on one of the tech channels on YouTube... A Sprint tower tech was saying speaking in anonymity that on closing (April 1) they are setting up to open the networks. Meaning, via software update, Sprint will have access to T-Mobile and vis-a-versa... on April 1st. Hoping this is true! On Tower Integration... They are setting up Integration do begin nearly immediately as they are set to do market by market tower integrations (combining towers/ moving equipment to best site). They will be doing massive mimo upgrades as much as possible at the same-time on 2.5, band 41, Band 25 (1900 sprint) band 2 (1900 T-Mo.) and Band 4 (TMO 1700/2100) According to him, they have the maps ready and will only be combing towers that are very nearby each other to avoid interference. The network integration will take approx 2 years, but realistically less. Again, this is market by market... (Metro area- by Metro area). Thoughts? ...
  12. 10 points
    OpenSignal tested every carrier's 5G network and determined that Sprint had the fastest average combined 4G/5G speeds out of the big 4. https://www.opensignal.com/2020/02/20/how-att-sprint-t-mobile-and-verizon-differ-in-their-early-5g-approach
  13. 10 points
    I don't remember which blog it was but it had the best headline announcing the closing of the brand, "Sprint sacrifices Virgin".😂
  14. 10 points
    All: I've been busy the past two days converting maps to BatchGeo. Which will we use to host our maps temporarily for a month or two while we work out a better long term solution. If you want me to recreate a map in one of your threads, send me the CSV file of the data and the the thread URL and I will create it in BatchGeo. I'd like to try to keep the site not looking like we were napalmed and burned up all the maps. I'm happy to create the maps for you. No matter how old the data. I like having historical data from years past, especially instead of broken links and missing maps. BatchGeo is limited to just 25,000 markers. So maps with more than than will need to be broken down into multiple maps. There is no extra charge for additional maps. We just pay a flat $99 per month fee. THANK YOU EVERYONE who have been helping with the maps. It is greatly appreciated. Robert
  15. 10 points
    I wish I had the screenshot, but it's sitting on my US Cellular phone at home. I forgot to post that on Friday, my wife and I went out shopping and I noticed my US Cellular phone was roaming on T-Mobile LTE instead of Sprint. I was trying to get it to look at Sprint B25, so I locked it to Band 25 to try to force it onto Sprint. I then found myself connected to T-Mobile B25, which was on the T-Mobile PCS carrier. They must be running MFBI on it now. I'll post my screenshot of it in SCP after work. - Trip
  16. 10 points
    Yes. But we didn't live in a bubble. There were two other vendors. Ericsson was clearly the worst of the three in Network Vision deployment (in some ways they had to do it twice). Also, when it comes to network management, a third party will almost NEVER do as good of a job yourself, because they don't take ownership of the issues the way you would yourself. And so there is not the sense of urgency when an issue or roadblock comes up. And you're much more likely to accept no as an answer. I see it all day long in my line of work. Robert
  17. 10 points
    Sorry for being late to this and some of this is repeating New York. They have $7 billion in cash and just under $10 billion in liquid assets. I guess I read that differently than you do. From the investor update presentation they've basically got enough liquidity to pay off their debt for the next two years if they do nothing at all. What will happen is what has happened for years. You'll likely see Sprint offer new notes at some point this year that will replace the debt or expand it further. He isn't talking about a "massive restructuring of their debt" at all. He is talking about what Sprint has done in the past and will continue to do going forward. Sprint has roughly $4.3 billion in debt due this fiscal year. If they issue $4.3 billion in new debt ceteris paribus their debt and liquidity positions haven't changed. They aren't refinancing $40 billion in debt. As maturing debt is retired they are issuing new debt. The next 3 years that is $4 to $5 billion a year at a time. Presumably indefinitely as long as someone is willing to lend to them (which there is a finite point somewhere there), but especially in the current economic conditions Sprint didn't have any trouble getting money last year and actually up-sized an offering due to favorable interest. The Free Cash Flow thing is a little weird. As a customer, I'd prefer Sprint invests in their network, something they did up about 50% year-over-year. That spending is going to drive Free Cash Flow down. If they had spent about $1 billion less in Capex they would've been free cash flow positive, which again is meaningless to me as a customer. It also isn't a really compelling failing firm argument, which is part of the reason they're having trouble convincing the DOJ of their arguement here. T-Mobile hasn't been FCF positive* since 2015. *using Cash from operations less capital expenditures
  18. 10 points
    SignalCheck 4.52 is rolling out to the masses! It should be available on Google Play within the hour. Here are the highlights: New options added: Added option to control display of horizontal signal meters on main screen. Added option to control logging of LTE sites if the TAC is missing/invalid. Added option to display LTE bandwidth on Android 9.0+ devices. This is nice, but not 100% reliable on most devices yet. Hopefully this improves over time. Added options to trigger Alerts based on specific LTE bands or plain-text strings. This is pretty cool.. you can choose LTE bands, and/or have the app alert on any text you want (or don't want, by using the "!" character). Set multiple alerts by separating strings with commas. Notable bug fixes: Resolved issue with app failing to exit immediately in certain scenarios. Resolved issue with missing data on Android Q Beta devices. Resolved issue with missing PLMN ID in certain scenarios. Resolved issue with missing provider database on Android 9.0 devices. Resolved issue with Alerts preferences not working properly on Android 8.0+ devices. Most of the Alert preferences are now handled directly by the system. Resolved issue with missing WCDMA data on newer devices. Some of these items were a lot more work than a brief sentence might hint.. many were significant bugs, some users will see great improvements! Other changes: Adjusted animated action bar tower icon colors when idle. Changed device location settings warning to reappear on every app update. Changed primary signal data source on Android 7.0+ devices. Disabled battery-related options for Location Service and Site Logger on Android 8.0+ devices; intend add back in a future update. Android no longer permits third-party apps to monitor power status changes; I am looking for an alternative method. Improved deployment process; releases will now be smaller, more optimized downloads. This is not a large app, but now it's approximately 30% smaller anyway. Thanks for all of your support! Feel free to shout if you have any questions.. -Mike
  19. 9 points
    An update to SignalCheck Pro is rolling out shortly and should be available on Google Play within the next several hours! This version includes many bugfixes; the full changelog is below with some details added about the most significant changes. Still working on full dual-SIM support; not sure when that is going to be ready. Thank you for all of your support! Added option to choose LTE cell ID display format: GCI, ECI, or hybrid. Based on user feedback, there is a new option under Preferences > Display to determine how LTE cell IDs are displayed. The default method is still "GCI", which is the hex ID most users are used to. "ECI" is a decimal version of the hex ID that some users asked for in the past; those who had previously enabled this option with a checkbox will need to re-select their choice. The new "hybrid" option displays the decimal ECI with a hexadecimal sector. This may be useful for AT&T and Verizon users because of the cell ID patterns implemented by those providers. (In my own testing, hex still appears to be the most useful for Sprint users). Resolved issue with missing CDMA data on some Android 10+ devices. This should resolve issues for Samsung users who recently updated to Android 10. Added option to display WCDMA neighbor cell PSC as hex. Resolved issue with PSC failing to be logged for WCDMA connections. The long-standing bugs with non-CDMA site logging should finally be resolved! Also, WCDMA PSC appears to be most useful as a hexadecimal value, so an option has been added under Preferences > Neighbor Cells to display neighbor IDs as hex. Moved Neighbor Cells preferences to separate menu. Trying to improve the Preferences menu organization; some of the screens are getting very long. Other less significant changes: Added additional indicators for AT&T LTE iDAS and small cells. Improved efficiency and stability of internal databases. Minor adjustments to action bar menu icons. Removed outdated references to nTelos. Resolved force closes related to missing resources on some devices. Resolved force closes when accessing Purchase menu with background service disabled. Resolved issue with invalid CDMA Ec/Io values displayed. Resolved issue with LTE band alerts not triggering when band changes. Resolved issue with LTE band alerts triggering for invalid bands. Resolved issue with some AT&T LTE band 66 connections displaying as band 4. Updated Shentel LTE indicators.
  20. 9 points
    Just because he can, doesn't mean he will. And he doesn't mean he is required to. He is thinking like an investor, not a philanthropist who is trying to find the best thing to serve the people, with his money. Believe me, I am not defending him. And he is not required to do with his money what you like, just because the government does not approve a merger (which they have already, by the way). The last hurdle really is just the state's lawsuit. I've never really been for the merger, anyway. I've always said Sprint can go it alone. Even when many here have vehemently disagreed with me. And it really torques me to see Masa's quotes that he was always capable and prepared to fully financially bail out Sprint. But basically let it languish intentionally as a better proposition to sell. But the most likely scenario is he would still continue to try to sell Sprint and further let it languish EVEN if the merger fails to occur. There are other suitors out there. Probably DISH or cable cos. Look how motivated Charlie Ergen seems to be. He just can't sell to a U.S. mobile company T-Mobile's size or bigger. That leaves just about everyone else in the world, except AT&T and Verizon. I would say if this all fails and the merger doesn't go through, the odds of Masa doing what was said in that quote and magically pays Sprint debts and turns the yellow carrier into the Number One network is virtually nil. So I wouldn't go hoping for it all to fail waiting for that scenario. As optimistic human beings, we have a tendency to extrapolate one sentence or idea into a full blown unrealistic personal fantasy. Taking one general theme or idea, and then we automatically fill in every sub-supporting scenario with our wishes and decisions all magically supporting it. Except it won't be your optimism that makes all those supporting decisions, it's Masa's desire to make as much money as quickly as possible and get rid of the investment that will be making those decisions. Trust me, you won't like all his other decisions even if he did pay off the debt. Masa has proven not to be a good owner from the customer's perspective. Probably, the best thing is to hope for is Masa to sell. For all my Charlie Ergen bashing, he doesn't seem so bad at the moment in context. All hail the new king! Any new king... Robert
  21. 9 points
    Yes, some of you disagree with me. That's to be expected. Sprint sucks in some places. But Sprint is not only great in my area, but they're actually the best. And in most metro areas, they are perfectly usable. But guess what? T-mobile sucks in many places. And I can tell you here in their home market, they're the worst carrier. Verizon also stinks in places too. I suppose if I lived in a crappy Sprint market, I'd go. But I can tell you I see more and more people who leave Sprint and either come back or even if they don't, admit that the network wasn't as bad as they thought and there was a complete over dramatization in the disparity in networks. Everybody's gotta do what's best for themselves. And if leaving Sprint is best for you, I certainly wouldn't hold it against anyone. I've seen many go over the years. And I still sit here plugging away behind the keyboard. But the one thing that won't continue is the overly negative drumbeat that's happening in this thread. You all are starting to build off each other's negativity, causing the conversation to become one sided and pointless. Don't want to hear ad infinitum the same droll negative grumblings. Especially the same 'ol criticisms and Sprint can't be trusted. Frankly, the drama is not true. Sprint took longer, yes, but it did upgrade its network, and the performance is better. And on the whole, it's better than its ever been. So it cannot be said Sprint didn't do it. They did. So let's stick to the thread discussion, which is the merger. Not on the network performance on Lower Botswana Avenue and your thoughts on changing networks because of your block. Robert
  22. 9 points
    Glad to do it , Robert. Especially now with all the work to convert and update all the maps. I know you and some others are really putting some major time in on the project. I look at your S4GRU site every day and most of the time, I am looking several times. The cost to operate the site is often overlooked. So many sites today are supported by paid ads that just destroy the experience at the site. This site is very clean and easy to navigate. Just loaded with info. Everybody that uses the site should step up and make a donation.
  23. 9 points
    Posted an update to the Top Donors list. Justen moves way up the list to #4. Brockeb1 has made it on to the list and jumps all the way in to #28! jlbattagli, Trip, and runagun also moved up quite a few spaces. Rawvega made it back on the list. And thank you for all your time on the list, but, lrosete777 and leerage were bumped off the bottom. THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR SUPPORT!!! Robert
  24. 9 points
    RootMetrics 2H 2019 RootScore Reports: Ann Arbor, MI - Median download speed decreased from 33.2Mbps to 18.4Mbps. (ouch) Austin, TX - Sprint recorded the fastest median download speed at 25.8Mbps. Boston, MA - Median download speed decreased from 30.2Mbps to 20.6Mbps. Chattanooga, TN - Median download speed decreased from 25.6 to 19.5Mbps. Corpus Christi, TX - Median download speed increased from 27.1Mbps to 36.2Mbps. Durham, NC - Median download speed increased from 9.7Mbps to 15.5Mbps. Louisville, KY - Sprint recorded the fastest median download speed at 31.4Mbps. Miami, FL - Median download speed decreased from 19.4Mbps to 13.9Mbps. NYC and the Tri-State area - "During outdoor walking tests in the dense urban core of New York, Sprint recorded the fastest median download speed at 66.9 Mbps..." (impressive) Sacramento, CA - Sprint recorded the fastest median download speed at 42.5Mbps, up from 35.5Mbps on the last report. Stockton, CA - Sprint recorded the fastest median download speed at 27.4Mbps, down from 33.3Mbps on the last report. Winston-Salem, NC - Median download speed increased from 9.5Mbps to 12.4Mbps.
  25. 9 points
    Got my Pixel 4 XL yesterday (Google Store). Activated instantly on Sprint via the eSim. WiFi Calling and VOLTE are functional. Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
  26. 9 points
  27. 9 points
    Please demonstrate what consequences AT&T is facing for raising prices twice in the year after their merger, despite representing to regulators that permitting the merger with Time Warner would permit them to lower prices. - Trip
  28. 9 points
    No. A cable company buying out Sprint or T-mobile would be very likely better for the consumer as they'd have an incentive to compete and gain subscribers. It's only the natural path forward if one looks at how Comcast and TWC (Spectrum) is setting up things. They've already began building the infrastructure of supporting wireless users and triple play integration based on their MVNO setup. The next step would fully integrate those wireless users into their entire network top down instead of piggybacking off say Verizon. They can leverage their long haul fiber and last mile hybrid fiber coaxial networks to provide dedicated full speed backhaul to their own cell sites and new ones they can leverage using their own telephone poles and right of ways. It's one of the reasons why Shentel land is so amazing. Full vertical integration.
  29. 9 points
    VoLTE post is up! https://s4gru.com/entry/439-sprints-casting-call-of-voice-over-actors-an-in-depth-analysis-of-volte-calling-and-vowifi/ Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
  30. 8 points
    Here we go!!! T-Mobile and Sprint are finally merging: What you need to know about the $26.5 billion deal
  31. 8 points
    T-Mobile has asked the FCC for a temporary authority to use Sprint's 2.5 GHz spectrum in advance of the merger close. They want to use it for 5G NR. https://www.fiercewireless.com/wireless/t-mobile-seeks-ok-to-use-2-5-ghz-philadelphia
  32. 8 points
    In this area (DC), at least, the Massive MIMO gear has continued to go online. I can see it in the MLS data. - Trip
  33. 8 points
    Looks like the official ruling is out. It's now officially, official. https://www.cnbc.com/2020/02/11/sprint-soars-after-judge-approves-its-merger-with-t-mobile.html I'm sure California and NY are working on their appeals as we speak. But I imagine that has an even slimmer chance of success than the original lawsuit. I would imagine Tmo and Sprint will move very quickly to close out the deal at this point.
  34. 8 points
    God dang, this has been a long wait for me buying, selling, buying, selling, buying but mostly holding shares of Sprint since 2011. I might be tens of thousands of dollars richer in the morning...
  35. 8 points
    My key takeaways: Wireless service revenue of $5.2B Net loss of $120M, but they cite over $2B of depreciation; depreciation is broken roughly into $1B on network equipment and $1B on leased devices $589M expensed in interest this quarter Sprint is $37B in debt currently, with ~$30B due by 2025 ARPA: $124.80, ARPU: $50.37 1.98% postpaid churn, up from 1.87% from last quarter; 4.92% prepaid churn, down from 4.94% last quarter 10th consecutive quarter of net additions 20 million people covered by 5G now with "thousands" of massive-MIMO-equipped sites online 37K small cells live, including both mini macros and strand mounts Ookla is rating Sprint as the 2nd fast carrier behind AT&T with a 45% increase in downlink speeds YOY 5G average downlink speeds are 215 Mbps
  36. 8 points
    That's my take. Other than uploads, Sprint may not be number one but is quite competitive. I don't drive the number one car, I don't fly the number one airline, I don't drink the number one coffee and so on...I use the best for me. And Sprint is now becoming more and more useful to more and more people. Regardless of an absolute number one position. The difference between 82 of this and 85 of that is pretty immaterial in the user experience. Robert
  37. 8 points
    An update to SignalCheck Pro is rolling out on Google Play right now, should become available shortly for everyone! Version 4.56 is mostly bugfixes, and includes the following changes: Added system shortcut for app system settings. Extensive code optimizations and enhancements. Internal code enhancements to Location Service. Removed persistent prompts/warnings that appeared when a user denied background location permission but had the background service disabled. Resolved force closes on some devices using decimal separators other than ‘dot’. Resolved force closes related to permission requests. Resolved internal exception when installing/updating the app. Resolved issue with incorrect signal strength notification icon when connected to LTE & Wi-Fi Calling. Resolved issue with negative LTE SNR values missing the “-” character. Resolved issue with persistent warnings appearing when a user denies background location permission and requests not to be prompted again. Resolved issue with screen padding not working with GSM-based connections. I anticipate dual SIM compatibility being the major change for the next update, and 5G support will be added after that. Thanks for all of your support! -Mike
  38. 8 points
    More interband goodness. I might move to Denver. The experience was amazing and so was the Sprint network. Sent from my SM-G977P using Tapatalk
  39. 8 points
  40. 8 points
    Just got the first Android 10 beta update for my S9, and it had the VOLTE toggle on it. Hurray
  41. 8 points
    Texas settles with TMo and drops opposition to merger. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-sprint-m-a-tmobile-idUSKBN1XZ1VG?taid=5ddbfe359007110001d302ca&utm_campaign=trueAnthem:+Trending+Content&utm_medium=trueAnthem&utm_source=twitter
  42. 8 points
    New beta finally rolling out right now on Google Play! No dramatic changes this time: Added option to add padding to the left and right borders of the main screen. Improved Android 10 compatibility. Resolved force closes on Samsung Android 10 devices. Resolved force closes related to exiting the app. I know there are a lot of outstanding bugs and requests; I am doing my best to prioritize my efforts on what is having the biggest impact on the largest number of users, and also squeeze in as many "quick" fixes/improvements that I can along the way. I am not dead, SignalCheck is not dead, everything is good -- just takes me awhile to piece together enough free time to produce a finished product worthy of release, even to the Beta Crew. I appreciate all of your support! -Mike
  43. 8 points
    Found this gem last night in the STL area. Found 5G on two towers. Pretty sure there is more.
  44. 8 points
    Gentlemen, calm down. You are pushing the limits of civility. 1st, this discussion really doesn't belong in this thread at all, which is (at least in theory) supposed to be about the attempted merger, not about the technical aspects of bands and FDD and TDD and all that other technical stuff. There are other threads for that. It would be nice if we could stick to the topic. 2nd, even if we do discuss the "technical stuff", you are blurring your arguments. There are at least 2 major aspects of Band 41 uplink which come into play here: Time-division allocations and signal propagation. In an ideal, strong-Band-41 signal situation, Sprint's roughly 5:1 time slice allocation is adequate for the vast majority of mobile users, as it is (for example) on my Comcast wired connection, which runs at a ratio of about 10:1. The bigger problem is that, in the absence of Carrier Aggregation (i.e., when you are ONLY on Band 41), if you are at any significant distance from the tower antenna or you are blocked in any way, your handset simply cannot transmit enough watts of signal to feed the uplink. So the downlink may be fast and robust, but your anemic little cell phone cannot push back. Sprint can't fix that, nor can the handset manufacturers, simply because FCC rules (and common sense) limit the transmit power so that you will not fry your brain. So, can we please return to our irregularly scheduled merger arguments? Thank you.
  45. 8 points
    Redundant sites will be collocated and the original Sprint site decommissioned yes, but anywhere the Sprint site adds to T-Mobile coverage they will be retained, with T-Mobile bands added. Coverage should only grow, not shrink.
  46. 8 points
    If I were in charge of Sprint and the merger fell through today, here are the changes I would make: Day 1 changes: Drop the L800 Qrxlevmin to -128. I don’t want users falling off L800 at -120 or -122 because: L800 will almost always offer better speeds than CDMA at those signal levels. This will reduce the reconnect time to usable LTE. The pocket 3G problem will be eliminated. VoLTE reliability will skyrocket. Remove the per-site “VoLTE enabled” flag (which by the way is a big part of the reason Sprint is struggling to support older devices) and allow it on all sites and Magic Boxes. This will allow software updates enabling VoLTE to be pushed to ISIM devices in a matter of weeks. Revert L2500 to Config 1 to both increase L2500 upload speeds and effective range. In markets where spectrum allows, split 8T8Rs into two 4T4R transmit chains and run 6 L2500 carriers. Some markets such as Seattle already have this. Short-term changes (within the first 12 months): Contact high-traffic venues (casinos, airports, stadiums, arenas, concert venues, underground train systems, convention centers, etc) and sign onto DAS systems. Begin buildout in high-roaming high-traffic areas such as ski resorts (e.g. Big Sky, MT and Sugarloaf, ME), rural tourist attractions (e.g. Mount Rushmore, SD and Yellowstone National Park) and large cities (e.g. Billings, MT and Chyenne, WY). Identify and begin to close in-city coverage gaps by means of: Implementing a verified coverage map to identify areas without LTE. Allow T-Mobile roaming and possibly even AT&T roaming everywhere and focus on high-roaming in-city areas. Expedite the Massive MIMO rollout to stay at the front of the 5G race. Expedite the tribanding of any remaining single-band/dual-band/non-redundant Clear sites. Look to increase backhaul to high-usage sites. Prioritize interband CA deployment. Prioritize the implementation of dynamic NR UL and move NR to the PCC. Begin talks with Dish to host their 600 and AWS-4 spectrum. This will at least double Sprint’s lowband capacity nationwide and give them greenfield lowband to deploy NR on. Long-term changes (after the first 12 months): Cut EVDO completely ASAP. Run a 1x1900 carrier in L1900 guard bands and maintain the 1x800 carrier. Begin to replace 800 radios with NR/LTE/1x DSS-capable radios. Begin a rural highway buildout in areas where the most T-Mobile and AT&T roaming occurs. The deployment will primarily be lowband. This task is not as daunting as it seems for sites already exist that cover effectively every major highway in the United States. The only thing to do will be to negotiate a reasonable lease. Open up an NR test drive program similar to the one T-Mobile ran for LTE and advertise it heavily.
  47. 8 points
    At the Nationals Game today! My iPhone XS automatically connected to a private WiFi network “provided by Sprint” at Nationals Park. Check out the data speeds here during the game. Nice job Sprint! Here’s the speeds over the WiFi:
  48. 8 points
  49. 8 points
    This is a non-sequitur. My whole point was that they have the service on paper, but not in reality. If they put 5G-NR on 600 MHz on those same towers that currently have 700 MHz, they can fill a map full of rural areas running "5G" with the actual service being as poor as it is today. (And, if 5G-NR is a more fragile airlink than LTE, then it will be poorer.) Spectrum is not the issue, deployment is. Lose how? Once they've merged, what is the remedy if they decide to give the FCC, DOJ, and the American people the middle finger? I remind you to check out all the remedies that have been used on AT&T so far, such as... ... huh, I can't think of any. - Trip
  50. 8 points
    New beta is finally done brewing and has been uploaded to Google Play.. should be available within the hour! Lots of significant bugfixes and new LTE alerts that should make people very happy. Changelog: https://signalcheck.app/change-log Thanks for your patience, and let me know what I broke.. -Mike
×
×
  • Create New...