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red_dog007
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Auction 107:

Hit $80.9B.:wacko:   Now going to enter the assignment phase where bidders can bid on specific spectrum blocks.

Wonder how fast this will get online this year.  TMobile's head start with 2.5GHz is gonna get challenged.  I could see them taking the lead in wireless tests in 2021 but then the gap close in 2022.

 

Auction 108:

Three blocks.  49.5, 50.5 and 16.5MHz. I wonder how heavy TMobile will buy here. It'll sorta clean up their holdings and I could see down the road if they don't bid they have to invest more time keeping interference out of the current existing white-space. Likely at least secure entire counties they already own a partial license in. Everything about 2.5 is such a mess.  

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The real question will be the effect on the upcoming 2.5 EBS auction.  T-Mobile might be able to get very good prices with almost no implementation costs for much better service in small cities and rural areas.

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They may get it cheap, but I'd doubt that means they would deploy a lot of it. Maybe more a protection thing so they don't have huge headaches with possible interference. 

In rural and smaller towns I go to, TMobile now is far from deploying their entire pre-Sprint spectrum portfolio.  I go to places and all they do is deploy just a single band.  If they go back with 5G they just add one more band (600).  Or they have all but one band deployed. 

Unless they are going to do B41/n41 on every tower like Sprint was wanting to do, I wouldn't keep my hopes up for a ton of rural 2.5.  You'd think though with fixed wireless services that doing full builds would make sense. 

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  • 5 weeks later...
On 1/26/2021 at 11:43 AM, red_dog007 said:

They may get it cheap, but I'd doubt that means they would deploy a lot of it. Maybe more a protection thing so they don't have huge headaches with possible interference. 

In rural and smaller towns I go to, TMobile now is far from deploying their entire pre-Sprint spectrum portfolio.  I go to places and all they do is deploy just a single band.  If they go back with 5G they just add one more band (600).  Or they have all but one band deployed. 

Unless they are going to do B41/n41 on every tower like Sprint was wanting to do, I wouldn't keep my hopes up for a ton of rural 2.5.  You'd think though with fixed wireless services that doing full builds would make sense. 

I've seen n41 in rural-ish areas already, plus some B41 on sites that were 25/26 only a year ago. They seem to be getting better about not just deploying a single band in places, though from what I've seen the more rural setup appears to be whatever B/n71 they have, plus a 5x5 B2 carrier to use as an NR anchor. Narrower bandwidths go further, hence running 5x5 when they definitely have the spectrum for more.

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21 hours ago, iansltx said:

Narrower bandwidths go further, hence running 5x5 when they definitely have the spectrum for more.

This is contrary to common wisdom of several years ago. Wider bandwidths were thought to be more resistant to interference. Wider bandwidths also use a lower percentage for buffers.

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1 hour ago, dkyeager said:

This is contrary to common wisdom of several years ago. Wider bandwidths were thought to be more resistant to interference. Wider bandwidths also use a lower percentage for buffers.

Not an interference issue, not a spectrum efficiency issue. Just a matter of throwing the signal as far as possible.

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Now that auction 107 is behind us, we come to auction 108, 2.5GHz.  Already a number of licenses have been awarded to federally recognized tribes as part of this process. Since we are still in the comment period for the rules, and the administration has changed, so could the rules.

https://www.fcc.gov/document/fcc-seeks-comment-procedures-25-ghz-auction

The 2.5GHz auction technical guide for bidding process  https://www.fcc.gov/auction/108/education

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For Auction 107, TMobile's approach makes way more sense.  Like why need 200MHz in all of Montana, North Dakota, etc?  Just seems odd. 

Does this spectrum have build-out requirements?

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Last night I was looking through the ED (EBS) licenses issued since 01/01/2020.  This is clouded by T-Mobile shifting ownership from one Sprint firm to another.  There are a lot of tribes that got licenses but this is by no means universal among tribes.  Most tribes have not leased their spectrum at this time. 

There were a few new ED licenses issued to Clearwire.  T-Mobile has also signed a lot of new ED leases scattered throughout the country.

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  • 3 months later...

Auction 110, 3.45GHz to 3.55GHz, starts October 5th.

Gonna be interesting to see how big carriers go after all the coin that was dropped on C-Band.

Does this spectrum have a referred to name?  Or will this just be referred to as C-Band once the auction is over instead of 3.45GHz?

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6 hours ago, red_dog007 said:

Auction 110, 3.45GHz to 3.55GHz, starts October 5th.

Gonna be interesting to see how big carriers go after all the coin that was dropped on C-Band.

Does this spectrum have a referred to name?  Or will this just be referred to as C-Band once the auction is over instead of 3.45GHz?

I think it's thought of as more of an extension of CBRS and has similar power limits, auction process, etc... single bidders are limited to 40 MHz again as well.

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On 6/19/2021 at 4:52 PM, jakeuten said:

I think it's thought of as more of an extension of CBRS and has similar power limits, auction process, etc... single bidders are limited to 40 MHz again as well.

Source on power limits? Believe there may be exclusion zones due to the Navy, but power limits are news to me. 40 MHz limit is rather similar, but that's as much spectrum as AT&T got on the early-clearing side, so that's pretty significant.

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  • Posts

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