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Sprint shut down page

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I became a Sprint customer on June 4, 2010 with the launch of the HTC EVO 4G.  I came over from AT&T.  I had just moved to New Mexico earlier that year and had virtually no AT&T Service in my area.  Sprint had decent coverage, and I thought I better move to a "4G" device if I was changing providers and getting all new equipment.  The rest was history.

You know, we are coming up on the 10 Year Anniversary of  the HTC EVO 4G launch.  10 YEARS!!!  It really is what was the catalyst that caused S4GRU to come about.  If I had gone to Verizon, this site and all the past 10 years of 4G hunting never would have happened.  It was really a close decision.  I think the cost of adding a line for my then 13 year old son is what probably pushed me over the edge.  What's funny is I pay about the same now for 5 lines on T-Mobile what I paid for 3 lines on Sprint back in 2010.

Robert

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I became a Sprint customer on June 4, 2010 with the launch of the HTC EVO 4G.  I came over from AT&T.  I had just moved to New Mexico earlier that year and had virtually no AT&T Service in my area.  Sprint had decent coverage, and I thought I better move to a "4G" device if I was changing providers and getting all new equipment.  The rest was history.

You know, we are coming up on the 10 Year Anniversary of  the HTC EVO 4G launch.  10 YEARS!!!  It really is what was the catalyst that caused S4GRU to come about.  If I had gone to Verizon, this site and all the past 10 years of 4G hunting never would have happened.  It was really a close decision.  I think the cost of adding a line for my then 13 year old son is what probably pushed me over the edge.  What's funny is I pay about the same now for 5 lines on T-Mobile what I paid for 3 lines on Sprint back in 2010.

Robert

Wow I never knew that the Evo 4G was the spark for the creation on S4GRU. I thank you for not going to Verizon! I’ve had sooo many memories of this site. I still have my Evo 4G that I got in college. Over the years I did switch away from Sprint a few times to see if the grass was greener being that Sprint has been the only carrier I’ve had since being on my parents plan in high school.

 

The other carriers (Verizon and att) did have better service at times but for me the price just wasn’t worth it to have service that was slightly faster. However, no matter what carrier I switched to, I kept my sprint account on the side just to keep up with things. As of yesterday I officially closed out the Verizon account after two years and ported my number back into sprint. I’m at the point where for the places I go, Sprint works just fine. Yes Verizon might be a little faster but it doesn’t justify the price. Hell I have the unlimited Premium plan for $65 per month (employee discount and Byod discount) thats a price you can’t beat with the amount of features you get.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I came to Sprint after the Nextel merger. I opened a line of service with Nextel back in 2005. I originally went into the Nextel store with a buddy of mine who was getting a phone serviced. The rep at the store ask me if I had service with Nextel the answer was no and I wasn’t interested in Nextel. The reason being 1 I was broke and 2 I had just finished high school. In those times Nextel required down payments some as high as $500 down and I had no where near that amount of money. Most people I knew at the time had paid those high prices for down payment. So the rep says you may quality for service and may not need a down payment depending on your credit. Which I didn’t have any credit at the time and I just knew I would get declined. I let her run my social security number. She came back and said you qualify for service with $0 down. I was like SWEET so I signed up and receive I think it was a Motorola i265 or something which was free with a 2 yr contract.

So I used Nextel for 2-3 years and converted my line to Sprint in 2007-2008 and purchased the Product Red Moro RAZR. I’ve been with Sprint ever since.

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I've been with Sprint since 2002. I was in high school at a conference (where I saw Nextel for the first time as well...I was amazed at the distance on the "walkie talkies"), and another attendee there had Sprint. We needed to look something up on the internet, and he was able to use his phone for it (1x data, used the minutes from the plan). The revelation that I could have internet access anywhere meant that I just had to have it. I convinced my parents to switch to Sprint from CellOne (regional carrier, later acquired by Alltel I think), since Sprint had nation wide coverage (rare at the time) and I was going to college soon somewhere not local.

 

Been with Sprint since then. Those were the days when Sprint was the data king. If you wanted fast mobile data, Sprint was who you had. Until they rolled out their EVDO network (Sprint Vision I think?), SMS was a pain. It was entirely web based. So you'd get an SMS telling you that you had an SMS, and then select the link to load the web portal to view it and respond. The only nice thing about it was that I could text from my computer haha.

 

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk

 

 

 

 

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Its sad to think that at some point we'll have a new generation of followers that the phrase "Sensorly or it didn't happen" will mean nothing to. :( The OG Evo 4G was my first smartphone also. Oh how things have changes over the years. I found this site one day on a break in between classes at UofL when I was googling why Sprint was so slow compared to others. Started learning about EvDo vs HSPA and also about Network Vision that day. Once LTE finally started rolling out my job lined up perfectly to track a lot of sites since I traveled a lot and my division lined up almost perfectly with East/West KY and some of the Nashville Sprint market. I still get to travel some but not nearly as much, I'm now in management and manage 7 field techs across 3 states. We actually use Sprint as a cellular backup for WAN in some retail locations, and we also use Sprint wired circuits in some office settings. Typically Spectrum is the LEC for our Sprint Ethernet circuits. It'll be interesting to see how the mergers affects both of those aspects.  

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I came to sprint in 2006 on the Samsung mm-920. First smartphone would be the palm centro. I know they weren't called smartphones, let's be honest palm started it all.

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Started on Sprint in 2000.   I had come from a "Bag phone" on Ameritec Wireless.  (50 cents a minute)    My first phone on Sprint in 2000, a Samsung Dual Band Flip.   

Loved it but was bulky.    Had it 2 years and Sprint started given a newer thinner redesigned Samsung flip because the little wire in the earpiece would break from opening and closing the phone.     This is when Sprint was different and was a true pioneer.    

Experiment in Living - By Shane M. White: A History of Cell Phones... Sch-3500,    Replaced by the Samsung Sch-n400  (Below in blue)

Item image 2   

My favorite all time sprint phone:  the Sanyo 8200 Vision phone (2004)image.jpeg.51836d02d93c8434cc09dfadc4d798ee.jpeg

Sanyo phones, at the time, were know to have the best antenna's for Sprint's network.     

 

 

 

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Started on Sprint in 2000.   I had come from a "Bag phone" on Ameritec Wireless.  (50 cents a minute)    My first phone on Sprint in 2000, a Samsung Dual Band Flip.   
Loved it but was bulky.    Had it 2 years and Sprint started given a newer thinner redesigned Samsung flip because the little wire in the earpiece would break from opening and closing the phone.     This is when Sprint was different and was a true pioneer.    
SamsungSCH-3500.jpg Sch-3500,    Replaced by the Samsung Sch-n400  (Below in blue)
s-l1600_thumb200.jpg   
My favorite all time sprint phone:  the Sanyo 8200 Vision phone (2004)image.jpeg.51836d02d93c8434cc09dfadc4d798ee.jpeg
Sanyo phones, at the time, were know to have the best antenna's for Sprint's network.     
 
 
 
Yup I had that Sanyo. I actually went through 2-3 of them.... The hinge kept breaking in the exact same spot, and Sprint would replace it.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk

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On 5/2/2020 at 2:52 PM, dro1984 said:

Started on Sprint in 2000.   I had come from a "Bag phone" on Ameritec Wireless.  (50 cents a minute)    My first phone on Sprint in 2000, a Samsung Dual Band Flip.   

Loved it but was bulky.    Had it 2 years and Sprint started given a newer thinner redesigned Samsung flip because the little wire in the earpiece would break from opening and closing the phone.     This is when Sprint was different and was a true pioneer.    

Experiment in Living - By Shane M. White: A History of Cell Phones... Sch-3500,    Replaced by the Samsung Sch-n400  (Below in blue)

Item image 2   

My favorite all time sprint phone:  the Sanyo 8200 Vision phone (2004)image.jpeg.51836d02d93c8434cc09dfadc4d798ee.jpeg

Sanyo phones, at the time, were know to have the best antenna's for Sprint's network.     

 

 

 

Loved those Sanyos... I bought an external antenna for them. I had some work in rural areas.. and those external antennas REALLLLLY boosted the distance..


I started with Voicestream back uhhh 25 years ago, when I started my Biz.. I remember their big pitch was "environmentally aesthetic" antennas.. in flag poles etc.  Had them to the switch to Tmo, then they started jerking me around, switched to sprint (the rural area work kind of pushed this to) they had better coverage for voice.  That was like 18 or 19 yrs ago....  Then like 2 yrs ago I dabbled back to Tmo for a year... yeah there were some issues...


Okk  so checking on some dates.. I found this.... WOW has sprint gone down hill comparatively..

   After its spin off from parent Western Wireless on May 3, 1999, VoiceStream Wireless was purchased by Deutsche Telekom AG in 2001 for $35 billion and renamed T-Mobile USA, Inc, in July 2002. In 2013, T-Mobile and MetroPCS finalised a merger of the two companies which started trading as T-Mobile U.S.

You may need to start paying close attention to your wireless bill as T-Mobile announced the closing of its $26 billion Sprint acquisition. These combined companies could raise fees for pre-paid and other low-cost mobile phone plans, now that they have control of more than 127 million customers.Apr 6, 2020

35 Billion in 01, for a lot loess customers..... and 26 Billion now.... THATS crazy

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